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The politics of Australia's withdrawal from Iraq

journal contribution
posted on 02.10.2014, 00:00 authored by Benjamin IsakhanBenjamin Isakhan
This article examines the complex matrix of public, political and policy debates that were brought to bear on Australia's decision to withdraw from Iraq. In analysing the ‘politics of withdrawal’ in Australia, this article identifies four dominant frames that served to polarise the issue along party-political lines and reduce the complexities of Australia's withdrawal to a set of simple polarities (such as ‘stay the course’ versus ‘responsible withdrawal’). Specifically, these frames obfuscated an assessment of the myriad challenges facing post-Saddam Iraq and the prospects for peace, security and development beyond Australia's withdrawal. Understanding the ways in which Australia framed its decision to disengage from Iraq is critical to further analysis of Australia's approach to current (or future) military draw-downs (such as in Afghanistan), as well as those conducted by other liberal democracies, such as the US and the UK.

History

Journal

Australian journal of political science

Volume

49

Issue

4

Pagination

647 - 661

Publisher

Routledge

Location

Melbourne, Vic.

ISSN

1036-1146

eISSN

1363-030X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2014, Routledge