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The process of change in offender rehabilitation programmes

journal contribution
posted on 2006-10-01, 00:00 authored by Andrew Day, J Bryan, L Davey, Sharon Casey
Whilst the overall effectiveness of offender rehabilitation programmes in reducing recidivism is now well established, there has been less discussion of the reasons why rehabilitation programmes may be unsuccessful for some offenders. In this paper we suggest that models of change developed in counselling and psychotherapy may have utility in explaining how offender rehabilitation programmes bring about change, and argue that the dominance of cognitive-behavioural treatments in the rehabilitation field means that those offenders who have particularly low levels of problem awareness may be at increased risk of treatment failure. Understanding more about the mechanisms by which programmes help offenders to desist from offending is likely to lead to the development of more responsive and, ultimately, more effective programmes. Some suggestions for those involved in the delivery of offender rehabilitation programmes include: being mindful of the sequence of components of programmes, the development of preparation (or readiness) programmes and offering a broad suite of programmes to cater for different stages of problem awareness and assimilation among offenders.

History

Journal

Psychology, crime and law

Volume

12

Issue

5

Pagination

473 - 487

Publisher

Routledge

Location

Oxon, England

ISSN

1068-316X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2006, Taylor & Francis