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The questioning skills of clinical teachers and preceptors: a comparative study

journal contribution
posted on 2001-02-01, 00:00 authored by Nikki PhillipsNikki Phillips, Maxine DukeMaxine Duke
Aim of the study. The purpose of this study, conducted as partial requirement for a Master of Nursing Studies Degree, was to explore, describe and compare the level of questions asked by clinical teachers and preceptors.

Background. Questioning is one of many teaching/learning strategies thought to facilitate the development of critical thinking skills which are integral to nursing practice. As such the type and number of questions asked have implications for student learning. Currently in Melbourne, Australia, many undergraduate nursing degree courses utilize both clinical teachers and preceptors to facilitate student learning in the clinical setting.

Design. A comparative descriptive design was used. Participants were given three acute care patient scenarios involving an undergraduate nursing student, as part of a questionnaire, and asked to identify the questions they would ask the student in relation to the scenario.

Findings. Data revealed that the clinical teachers had considerably more years of experience in their role and higher academic qualifications than did the preceptors. The clinical teachers also asked a greater number of questions overall and more from the higher cognitive level. Despite this, the findings suggest that both clinical teachers and especially preceptors need to increase the number of higher level questions they ask.

Conclusions. Based on the findings of this study, it is evident that there is a need for further comparative studies into the questioning skills of clinical teachers and preceptors. Also, these two groups require education about the importance of higher level questioning for student learning as well as how to ask questions generally.

History

Journal

Journal of advanced nursing

Volume

33

Issue

4

Pagination

523 - 529

Publisher

Blackwell

Location

Oxford, England

ISSN

0309-2402

eISSN

1365-2648

Language

eng

Notes

Published Online: Jul 7

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal; C Journal article

Copyright notice

2001, Blackwell Science Ltd