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The relationship of inferential confusion and obsessive beliefs with specific obsessive-compulsive symptoms

Version 2 2024-06-13, 16:36
Version 1 2018-07-09, 14:32
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-13, 16:36 authored by F Aardema, K Wu, R Moulding, JS Audet, LP Baraby
This study aimed to investigate the specificity of inferential confusion and obsessive beliefs to symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The construct of inferential confusion is grounded in an Inference-Based Approach (IBA) to the study of OCD, which maintains that dysfunctional reasoning plays a central role in its development, whereas other cognitive models have emphasized the role of obsessive beliefs in the escalation of intrusive thoughts into obsessions. To investigate the role of inferential confusion and obsessive beliefs, a group of individuals diagnosed with OCD (N = 296) completed the Inferential Confusion Questionnaire (ICQ-EV) and the Obsessive Beliefs Questionnaire (OBQ-44). As expected, inferential confusion and obsessive beliefs uniquely predicted OCD symptoms. Specifically, importance and control of thoughts was particularly relevant to obsessions, perfectionism and certainty to precision, and just right and inferential confusion to indecision and rumination. Beliefs about responsibility and threat did not uniquely predict any symptoms of OCD. Results are discussed in terms of future avenues for research, and how an investigation of cognitive constructs that are not explicitly represented in the OBQ-44 may help to further inform and refine cognitive models of OCD.

History

Journal

Journal of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders

Volume

18

Pagination

98-105

Location

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

ISSN

2211-3649

eISSN

2211-3657

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2018, Elsevier Inc.

Publisher

Elsevier