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The role of social enterprise in food insecurity among asylum seekers

journal contribution
posted on 2018-11-01, 00:00 authored by Bronte Haines, Fiona McKayFiona McKay, Matthew DunnMatthew Dunn, Kehla LippiKehla Lippi
People seeking asylum in high-income countries are vulnerable to food insecurity due to limited opportunities for social and economic participation. Given this vulnerability, nongovernment organisations are attempting to improve food security outcomes through targeted programmes. This study explored the role of a subsidised mobile fresh fruit and vegetable market (the Food Justice Truck-FJT) on the experience of food insecurity for people seeking asylum living in Melbourne, Australia. This research uses a mixed methods approach, employing surveys and semistructured interviews to explore the lived experiences of asylum seekers using the FJT, including their experiences of food insecurity. Half of the asylum seekers interviewed in this study were found to be experiencing food insecurity. Participants in this study sourced food from multiple locations, with the FJT providing a supplemental, but highly valued source of fresh produce. The FJT was identified as positive social setting for some participants included in this research. This research has identified the ability of programmes such as the FJT to act as positive social settings.

History

Journal

Health and social care in the community

Volume

26

Issue

6

Pagination

829 - 838

Publisher

Wiley

Location

Chichester, Eng.

ISSN

0966-0410

eISSN

1365-2524

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2018, John Wiley & Sons Ltd