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The theory and practice of coastal area planning: linking strategic planning to local communities

journal contribution
posted on 01.01.2004, 00:00 authored by Geoffrey WescottGeoffrey Wescott
Integrated coastal management (ICM) has been slowly accepted over the last decade as a unifying approach for coastal planning and management throughout the world. Coastal planning aimed at achieving the objectives of ICM can be implemented by varying processes and faces many challenges. One major challenge for coastal planning is to adapt the well-developed theoretical principles of ICM to practical and understandable outcomes in local areas. Associated with this challenge is the need to balance coastal planning objectives for conservation and economic development of a nation or state/province with the objectives of the local community. This article describes a three-tiered approach to coastal planning in Victoria, Australia, which will be of value to other countries, particularly those with subnational coastal planning jurisdictions. This approach not only has the aim of balancing subnational (e.g., state government) and local objectives, but also of applying the theoretical concept of ICM in practice on the ground. In addition, the approach sets out to achieve a sense of ownership of the planning process by local communities by maximizing their involvement at all levels of planning and also by making the state strategy as easy to understand and follow as possible.

History

Journal

Coastal management

Volume

32

Issue

1

Pagination

95 - 100

Publisher

Taylor and Frances Inc

Location

New York, N.Y.

ISSN

0892-0753

eISSN

1521-0421

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

Taylor & Francis Inc.