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Theorizing Factors Mediating With the Implementation of a Patient Feedback on Safety Intervention Implemented in the Primary Care Setting

Developing safety interventions using patient feedback is valuable for creating safer systems of health care. A qualitative process evaluation of a patient feedback on safety intervention was undertaken in six primary care practices. The purpose was to theorize factors mediating with the implementation of the intervention using existing theories. The intervention required practices to obtain patient feedback on safety using a validated tool and respond using quality improvement methods. Multiple methods of qualitative data collection were used, including interviews and overt observation. Abductive reasoning informed the iterative process of analysis that examined theories relevant to the intervention and setting. A theoretical framework was developed, which encompassed mediating factors grouped under three concepts: practice readiness, utilization of problem-solving skills, and agency. Theorizing mediating factors was necessary to understand the complexities of primary care practices, and to identify the essential components for implementation of the intervention on a larger scale.

History

Journal

Qualitative Health Research

Volume

31

Article number

ARTN 10497323211028829

Pagination

2260-2273

Location

United States

ISSN

1049-7323

eISSN

1552-7557

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

12

Publisher

SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC