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Thermal and rheological characteristics of biobased carbon fiber precursor derived from low molecular weight organosolv lignin

Version 2 2024-06-04, 11:29
Version 1 2015-08-17, 13:59
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-04, 11:29 authored by A Oroumei, B Fox, Minoo NaebeMinoo Naebe
In the present work, electrospinnability as well as thermal, rheological, and morphological characteristics of low molecular weight hardwood organosolv lignin, as a potential precursor for carbon fiber, was investigated. Submicromter biobased fibers were electrospun from a wide range of polymer solutions with different ratios of organosolv lignin to polyacrylonitrile (PAN). Rheological studies were conducted by measuring viscosity, surface tension, and electrical conductivity of hybrid polymer solutions, and used to correlate electrospinning behavior of solutions with the morphology of the resultant electrospun composite fibers. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, the solutions that led to the formation of bead-free uniform fibers were found. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis revealed that lignin-based fibers enjoy higher decomposition temperatures than that of pure PAN. Thermal stability of the lignin-based fibers was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicating a high carbon yield of above 50% at 600 °C, which is highly crucial in the production of low-cost carbon fiber. It was also observed that organosolv lignin synergistically affects thermal decomposition of composite fibers. A significant lower activation energy was found for the pyrolysis of lignin-derived electrospun fibers compared to that of pure PAN.

History

Journal

ACS sustainable chemistry and engineering

Volume

3

Pagination

758-769

Location

Washington, D.C.

eISSN

2168-0485

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article, C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2015, American Chemical Society

Issue

4

Publisher

American Chemical Society