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Toward a skin-material interface with vacuum-integrated capped macroporous scaffolds

journal contribution
posted on 2017-07-01, 00:00 authored by Gil Stynes, G K Kiroff, W A Morrison, Richard PageRichard Page, M A Kirkland
Avulsion, epidermal marsupialization, and infection cause failure at the skin-material interface. A robust interface would permit implantable robotics, prosthetics, and other medical devices; reconstruction of surgical defects, and long-term access to blood vessels and body cavities. Torus-shaped cap-scaffold structures were designed to work in conjunction with negative pressure to address the three causes of failure. Six wounds were made on the backs of each of four 3-month old pigs. Four unmodified (no caps) scaffolds were implanted along with 20 cap-scaffolds. Collagen type 4 was attached to 21 implants. Negative pressure then was applied. Structures were explanted and assessed histologically at day 7 and day 28. At day 28, there was close tissue apposition to scaffolds, without detectable reactions from defensive or interfering cells. Three cap-scaffolds explanted at day 28 showed likely attachment of epidermis to the cap or cap-scaffold junction, without deeper marsupialization. The combination of toric-shaped cap-scaffolds with negative pressure appears to be an intrinsically biocompatible system, enabling a robust skin-material interface. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

History

Journal

Journal of biomedical materials research

Volume

105

Issue

5

Pagination

1307 - 1318

Publisher

Wiley

Location

Chichester, Eng.

eISSN

1552-4981

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article; C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2016, Wiley Periodicals