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Tracking it down: predictors of risky drinking in an Australian railway

Version 2 2024-06-17, 20:53
Version 1 2016-11-18, 14:46
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-17, 20:53 authored by L Zinkiewicz, J Davey, P Obst, M Sheehan
In the present study, employees (N=4,979) of an Australian state railway were surveyed in order to determine self-reported employee alcohol use and the influence of work-related risk factors on this use. Male employees reported drinking more frequently than did female employees, with younger employees drinking more often than older ones. In comparison to Australian men in general (National Drug Strategy [NDS], 1996), male employees reported drinking less frequently. When compared to Australian women, female employees reported drinking more frequently. Administration and management were the most likely employees to report drinking 5-7 days-a-week. Station staff were the most likely workstream to report problem drinking. Train crews did not report high frequency drinking or problem drinking, but reported using alcohol to sleep. Examination of risk factors previously associated with work-related problem drinking showed that gender, nights away from home for work, job satisfaction, and availability of alcohol were significant predictors of high frequency drinking and problem drinking. Age was also a predictor of problem drinking. Shiftwork, overtime, time away from home, and job satisfaction were significantly related to using alcohol to get to sleep. These findings are discussed in the context of prior research into railway worker drinking.

History

Journal

Journal of alcohol and drug education

Volume

44

Pagination

44-59

ISSN

0090-1482

Publication classification

CN.1 Other journal article

Issue

2

Publisher

American Alcohol and Drug Information Foundation

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