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Tracking of maternal self-efficacy for limiting young children's television viewing and associations with children's television viewing time: A longitudinal analysis over 15-months Health behavior, health promotion and society

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Background: Mothers' self-efficacy for limiting their children's television viewing is an important correlate of this behaviour in young children. However, no studies have examined how maternal self-efficacy changes over time, which is potentially important during periods of rapid child development. This study examined tracking of maternal self-efficacy for limiting young children's television viewing over 15-months and associations with children's television viewing time. Methods: In 2008 and 2010, mothers (n∈=∈404) from the Melbourne InFANT Program self-reported their self-efficacy for limiting their child's television viewing at 4- and 19-months of age. Tertiles of self-efficacy were created at each time and categorised into: persistently high, persistently low, increasing or decreasing self-efficacy. Weighted kappa and multinomial logistic regression examined tracking and demographic and behavioural predictors of change in self-efficacy. A linear regression model examined associations between tracking categories and children's television viewing time. Results: Tracking of maternal self-efficacy for limiting children's television viewing was low (kappa∈=∈0.23, p∈<∈0.001). Mothers who had persistently high or increasing self-efficacy had children with lower television viewing time at 19-months (β∈=∈-35.5; 95 % CI∈=∈-54.4,-16.6 and β∈=∈37.0; 95 % CI∈=∈-54.4,-19.7, respectively). Mothers of children with difficult temperaments were less likely to have persistently high self-efficacy. Mothers who met adult physical activity guidelines had 2.5 greater odds of increasing self-efficacy. Conclusions: Interventions to increase and maintain maternal self-efficacy for limiting children's television viewing time may result in lower rates of this behaviour amongst toddlers. Maternal and child characteristics may need to be considered when tailoring interventions.

History

Journal

BMC Public Health

Volume

15

Issue

1

eISSN

1471-2458

Publication classification

C Journal article; C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2015, BioMed Central