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Transient Administration of Dopaminergic Precursor Causes Inheritable Overfeeding Behavior in Young Drosophila melanogaster Adults

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journal contribution
posted on 2024-07-11, 02:52 authored by Thiago C Moulin, Federico Ferro, Samuel Berkins, Angela Hoyer, Michael J Williams, Helgi B Schiöth
Imbalances in dopaminergic signaling during development have been indicated as part of the underlying neurobiology of several psychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia, major depression, bipolar disorder, and food addiction. Yet, how transient manipulation of dopaminergic signaling influences long-lasting behavioral consequences, or if these modifications can induce inheritable traits, it is still not understood. In this study, we used the Drosophila melanogaster model to test if transient pharmacological activation of the dopaminergic system leads to modulations of feeding and locomotion in adult flies. We observed that transient administration of a dopaminergic precursor, levodopa, at 6 h, 3 days or 5 days post-eclosion, induced overfeeding behavior, while we did not find significant effects on locomotion. Moreover, this phenotype was inherited by the offspring of flies treated 6 h or 3 days post-eclosion, but not the offspring of those treated 5 days post-eclosion. These results indicate that transient alterations in dopaminergic signaling can produce behavioral alterations in adults, which can then be carried to descendants. These findings provide novel insights into the conditions in which environmental factors can produce transgenerational eating disorders.

History

Journal

Brain Sciences

Volume

10

Pagination

487-487

Location

Basel, Switzerland

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

2076-3425

eISSN

2076-3425

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

8

Publisher

MDPI