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Ubby's underdogs: a transformative vision of Australian community

Version 2 2024-06-03, 11:19
Version 1 2016-09-21, 18:40
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 11:19 authored by Clare BradfordClare Bradford, C Sly, D Xu
In Black Words White Page (2004), his seminal study of Aboriginal cultural production in Australia, Adam Shoemaker notes that ‘when Oodgeroo Noonuccal’s first collection of poetry appeared in print in 1964, a new phase of cultural communication began in Australia’ (2004, p. 5). The ‘new phase’ to which Shoemaker refers pertains to the many plays, collections of poetry and novels by Aboriginal authors published between 1964 and 1988 and directed to Australian and international audiences. Flying under the radar of scholarly attention, Aboriginal authors and artists also produced significant numbers of children’s books during this time, including Wilf Reeves and Olga Miller’s The Legends of Moonie Jarl, published by Jacaranda Press in 1964 (see O’Conor 2007), Oodgeroo Noonuccal’s Stradbroke Dreamtime (1972), and the picture books of Dick Roughsey and many other Aboriginal authors and artists (see Bradford 2001, pp. 159-90).

History

Journal

Papers: explorations into children's literature

Volume

24

Pagination

101-131

Location

Melbourne, VIC

ISSN

1034-9243

Indigenous content

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologise for any distress that may occur.

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article, C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2016, Australasian Children's Literature Association for Research

Issue

1

Publisher

Australasian Children's Literature Association for Research