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Understanding the acceptability of wolf management actions: roles of cognition and emotion

Version 2 2024-06-03, 23:51
Version 1 2019-11-11, 10:03
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 23:51 authored by TM Straka, Kelly MillerKelly Miller, MH Jacobs
Wolf management actions are seldom universally accepted and understanding diverse opinions is of value for conservation practitioners. Previous research has either investigated cognitions or emotions to understand public acceptability of wolf management actions. We investigated both concepts simultaneously to identify whether their predictive potentials are mutually exclusive. A survey measuring wildlife value orientations, valence (positive-negative emotions) toward wolves, and responses to wolf management actions (doing nothing, public education, lethal control) was completed by 597 Dutch and German university students. Valence predicted the acceptability of all wolf management actions. Wildlife value orientations predicted the acceptability of lethal control and partially public education but not of doing nothing. Emotions thus added predictive potential next to cognitions to understand responses to wolf management actions. For both research and practice, it is important to acknowledge that the acceptability of wolf management actions is not only guided by what people think, but also by what they feel.

History

Journal

Human dimensions of wildlife

Volume

25

Pagination

33-46

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

1087-1209

eISSN

1533-158X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

1

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

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