Deakin University
Browse
islam-understandingthesocial-2021.pdf (429.78 kB)

Understanding the social drivers of antibiotic use during COVID-19 in Bangladesh: Implications for reduction of antimicrobial resistance

Download (429.78 kB)
Version 2 2024-06-12, 15:11
Version 1 2022-01-12, 08:09
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-12, 15:11 authored by A Kalam, S Shano, MA Khan, A Islam, N Warren, MM Hassan, M Davis
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global public health crisis that is now impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Little is known how COVID-19 risks influence people to consume antibiotics, particularly in contexts like Bangladesh where these pharmaceuticals can be purchased without a prescription. This paper identifies the social drivers of antibiotics use among home-based patients who have tested positive with SARS-CoV-2 or have COVID-19-like symptoms. Using qualitative telephone interviews, the research was conducted in two Bangladesh cities with 40 participants who reported that they had tested positive for coronavirus (n = 20) or had COVID-19-like symptoms (n = 20). Our analysis identified five themes in antibiotic use narratives: antibiotics as ‘big’ medicine; managing anxiety; dealing with social repercussions of COVID-19 infection; lack of access to COVID-19 testing and healthcare services; and informal sources of treatment advice. Antibiotics were seen to solve physical and social aspects of COVID-19 infection, with urgent ramifications for AMR in Bangladesh and more general implications for global efforts to mitigate AMR.

History

Journal

PLoS One

Volume

16

Article number

e0261368

Pagination

1-19

Location

San Francisco, Calif.

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

1932-6203

eISSN

1932-6203

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

12

Publisher

Public Library of Science

Usage metrics

    Research Publications

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC