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Urban Neighbourhood Environments, Cardiometabolic Health and Cognitive Function: A National Cross-Sectional Study of Middle-Aged and Older Adults in Australia

Version 3 2024-06-19, 12:23
Version 2 2024-06-13, 17:23
Version 1 2023-02-28, 03:24
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-19, 12:23 authored by E Cerin, A Barnett, JE Shaw, E Martino, LD Knibbs, R Tham, AJ Wheeler, KJ Anstey
Population ageing and urbanisation are global phenomena that call for an understanding of the impacts of features of the urban environment on older adults’ cognitive function. Because neighbourhood characteristics that can potentially have opposite effects on cognitive function are interdependent, they need to be considered in conjunction. Using data from an Australian national sample of 4141 adult urban dwellers, we examined the extent to which the associations of interrelated built and natural environment features and ambient air pollution with cognitive function are explained by cardiometabolic risk factors relevant to cognitive health. All examined environmental features were directly and/or indirectly related to cognitive function via other environmental features and/or cardiometabolic risk factors. Findings suggest that dense, interconnected urban environments with access to parks, blue spaces and low levels of air pollution may benefit cognitive health through cardiometabolic risk factors and other mechanisms not captured in this study. This study also highlights the need for a particularly fine-grained characterisation of the built environment in research on cognitive function, which would enable the differentiation of the positive effects of destination-rich neighbourhoods on cognition via participation in cognition-enhancing activities from the negative effects of air pollutants typically present in dense, destination-rich urban areas.

History

Journal

Toxics

Volume

10

Pagination

23-23

Location

Switzerland

ISSN

2305-6304

eISSN

2305-6304

Language

en

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

1

Publisher

MDPI AG

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