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Visualization and quantitation of GLUT4 translocation in human skeletal muscle following glucose ingestion and exercise

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journal contribution
posted on 2015-05-12, 00:00 authored by H Bradley, Chris ShawChris Shaw, C Bendtsen, P L Worthington, O J Wilson, J A Strauss, G A Wallis, A M Turner, A J M Wagenmakers
Insulin- and contraction-stimulated increases in glucose uptake into skeletal muscle occur in part as a result of the translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) from intracellular stores to the plasma membrane (PM). This study aimed to use immunofluorescence microscopy in human skeletal muscle to quantify GLUT4 redistribution from intracellular stores to the PM in response to glucose feeding and exercise. Percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were taken from the m. vastus lateralis of ten insulin-sensitive men in the basal state and following 30 min of cycling exercise (65% VO2 max). Muscle biopsy samples were also taken from a second cohort of ten age-, BMI- and VO2 maxmatched insulin-sensitive men in the basal state and 30 and 60 min following glucose feeding (75 g glucose). GLUT4 and dystrophin colocalization, measured using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient, was increased following 30 min of cycling exercise (baseline r = 0.47 0.01; post exercise
r = 0.58 0.02; P < 0.001) and 30 min after glucose ingestion (baseline
r = 0.42 0.02; 30 min r = 0.46 0.02; P < 0.05). Large and small GLUT4
clusters were partially depleted following 30 min cycling exercise, but not 30 min after glucose feeding. This study has, for the first time, used immunofluorescence microscopy in human skeletal muscle to quantify increases in GLUT4 and dystrophin colocalization and depletion of GLUT4 from large and smaller clusters as evidence of net GLUT4 translocation to the PM.

History

Journal

Physiological reports

Volume

3

Issue

5

Article number

e12375

Pagination

1 - 11

Publisher

American Physiological Society

Location

Bethesda, M.D.

eISSN

2051-817X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article; C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2015, American Physiological Society