Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

WISE-2005: bed-rest induced changes in bone mineral density in women during 60 days simulated microgravity

Version 2 2024-06-13, 17:02
Version 1 2015-03-17, 14:39
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-13, 17:02 authored by G Beller, D Belavy, L Sun, G Armbrecht, C Alexandre, D Felsenberg
To better understand the effects of prolonged bed-rest in women, 24 healthy women aged 25 to 40 years participated in 60-days of strict 6° head-down tilt bed-rest (WISE-2005). Subjects were assigned to either a control group (CON, n=8) which performed no countermeasure, an exercise group (EXE, n=8) undertaking a combination of resistive and endurance training or a nutrition group (NUT, n=8), which received a high protein diet. Using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) and dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), bone mineral density (BMD) changes at various sites, body-composition and lower-leg and forearm muscle cross-sectional area were measured up to 1-year after bed-rest. Bone loss was greatest at the distal tibia and proximal femur, though losses in trabecular density at the distal radius were also seen. Some of these bone losses remained statistically significant one-year after bed-rest. There was no statistically significant impediment of bone loss by either countermeasure in comparison to the control-group. The exercise countermeasure did, however, reduce muscle cross-sectional area and lean mass loss in the lower-limb and also resulted in a greater loss of fat mass whereas the nutrition countermeasure had no impact on these parameters. The findings suggest that regional differences in bone loss occur in women during prolonged bed-rest with incomplete recovery of this loss one-year after bed-rest. The countermeasures as implemented were not optimal in preventing bone loss during bed-rest and further development is required.

History

Journal

Bone

Volume

49

Pagination

858-866

Location

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

eISSN

1873-2763

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2011, Elsevier

Issue

4

Publisher

Elsevier