auld-whatcan-2002.pdf (642.99 kB)
Download file

What can we say about 112,000 taps on a Ndjebbana touch screen?

Download (642.99 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 2002-02-02, 00:00 authored by Glenn AuldGlenn Auld
This paper reports on the use of touch screens to display simple talking books in a minority Indigenous Australian language. Three touch screens are located in an informal context in a remote Indigenous Australian community. The popularity of the computers can be explained by the form of the touch screen and by the intertextual and hybrid nature of the talking books. The results suggest the Kunibidji choose to transform their own culture by including new digital technologies which represent their societal practice

History

Journal

Australian journal of Indigenous education

Volume

30

Issue

1

Pagination

1 - 7

Publisher

University Of Queensland : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit

Location

Brisbane, Qld.

ISSN

1326-0111

Indigenous content

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologise for any distress that may occur.

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2002, University Of Queensland, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit

Usage metrics

Categories

Exports