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What determines migration flows from low-income to high-income countries? An empirical investigation of Fiji-U.S. migration 1972-2001

journal contribution
posted on 2006-04-01, 00:00 authored by Paresh Narayan, R Smyth
This article examines the long-run and short-run determinants of migration from Fiji to the United States between 1972 and 2001 using a human capital framework, which is extended to take account of political instability in Fiji. In the long-run the authors find that differences in income levels, disparities in police strength, disparities in the number of doctors, costs of moving, and political instability in Fiji are all statistically significant with the expected sign. In the short run the cost of moving, lagged migration, political instability, and differences in both police strength and medical care are the main determinants of Fiji-United States immigration.

History

Journal

Contemporary economic policy

Volume

24

Issue

2

Pagination

332 - 342

Publisher

Western Economic Association International

Location

Huntington Beach, Calif.

ISSN

1074-3529

eISSN

1465-7287

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2005, Western Economic Association International

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