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What is the contribution of actual motor skill, fitness, and physical activity to children’s self-perception of motor competence?

journal contribution
posted on 01.10.2018, 00:00 authored by Lisa BarnettLisa Barnett, D Lubans, Jo SalmonJo Salmon, Anna TimperioAnna Timperio, Nicky RidgersNicky Ridgers
This study aimed to examine the contribution of objective measures of physical fitness (musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory), physical activity and motor skill to motor perception. A total of 122 children (63 boys) aged 9-11 years were assessed. Independent t-tests assessed sex differences in all variables. Two linear mixed models adjusted for sex and age were performed with perceived object control and locomotor skills (pictorial scale of Perceived Movement Skill Competence for young children) as outcomes. Aerobic (multi-stage fitness test) and muscular fitness (long jump, grip strength), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (ActiGraph accelerometry), movement skill (Test of Gross Motor Development-2), age and sex were predictors. Boys had higher object control skills (actual and perceived) and fitness. Age (decreasing) and long jump distance (positive) explained 16% of locomotor skill perception variance. Sex (boys) explained 13% of object control skill perception variance. Children’s skill self-perception may be influenced by fitness attributes as these are more evident to them. The fact that girls have lower actual object control competence and fitness than boys suggest girls may be an intervention target.

History

Journal

Journal of motor learning and development

Volume

6

Issue

s2

Pagination

S461 - S473

Publisher

Human Kinetics

Location

Champaign, Ill.

ISSN

2325-3193

eISSN

2325-3215

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal; C Journal article

Copyright notice

2017, Human Kinetics, Inc.