File(s) under permanent embargo

When social anxiety co-occurs with substance use: does an impulsive social anxiety subtype explain this unexpected relationship?

journal contribution
posted on 2014-12-30, 00:00 authored by J Nicholls, Petra StaigerPetra Staiger, James Williams, Ben Richardson, Nicolas KambouropoulosNicolas Kambouropoulos
Although most conceptualizations of social anxiety emphasise that socially anxious individuals are overtly shy, and utilise avoidant behavioural strategies (e.g., risk-aversion, passivity, and submissiveness), there is tentative support for the existence of an approach-motivated subtype, characterised by risk taking and a greater propensity for substance misuse. It is likely that this subtype may help explain the reported co-occurrence of substance misuse and social anxiety. The current study sought to test via latent class analysis whether an approach-motivated social anxiety subtype could be identified within a community sample. A self-report questionnaire was completed by 351 participants (age: 18-74 years). Two distinct social anxiety subgroups were identified: one characterised by prototypical SAD symptomatology (i.e., behavioural inhibition and risk-avoidance), the second by elevated levels of rash impulsiveness, reward sensitivity, risk-taking and co-occurring substance use problems. The current findings provides support for the existence of a distinct approach-motivated social anxiety subtype and indicates that impulsivity may be critical to understanding the comorbid substance use symptomatology of these individuals.

History

Journal

Psychiatry research

Volume

220

Issue

3

Pagination

909 - 914

Publisher

Elsevier Ireland

Location

Shannon, Ireland

ISSN

0165-1781

eISSN

1872-7123

Language

ENG

Publication classification

C Journal article; C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2014, Elsevier Ireland