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Which work characteristics predict employee outcomes for the public-sector employee? An examination of generic and occupation-specific characteristics

journal contribution
posted on 2005-08-01, 00:00 authored by Andrew NobletAndrew Noblet, S Teo, John Mc Williams, John Rodwell
The wide-ranging changes that have occurred in the public sector over recent years have placed increasing demands on public-sector employees. A survey of employees within a relatively commercially-oriented public-sector organization in Australia was used to test a demand-oriented generic model of employee well-being and a variety of situation-specific variables. The presence of support at work and the amount of control an employee had over their job were found to be key predictors of employee-level outcomes. Perceptions of pay and the perception of a lack of human resources (HR) were also found to predict employee outcome variables. The results emphasize the impact that middle managers and HR managers can have in terms of reducing the detrimental employee effects that can be caused by the introduction of new public management (NPM) and the potential for a positive impact on employees. In particular, public-sector managers can use the design of jobs and the development of social support mechanisms, such as employee assistance programmes, to maintain, if not improve, the quality of working life experienced by their employees. More broadly, this study has found that the job strain model is a useful tool in a public-sector environment and is likely to be of increasing utility with the continuing introduction or consolidation of NPM over time. Managing these issues in the new public sector could be a key means of protecting the key resource of the Australian public sector - the employees.

History

Journal

International journal of human resource management

Volume

16

Issue

8

Pagination

1415 - 1430

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Location

London, England

ISSN

0958-5192

eISSN

1466-4399

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2005, Taylor & Francis

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