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Young people and intercultural sociality after Cronulla

journal contribution
posted on 2017-01-01, 00:00 authored by Anita HarrisAnita Harris, M Herron
This paper considers how the Cronulla riots have shaped some popular directions in theory and practice regarding young people’s intercultural relations that are primarily focused on social cohesion, harmony and cultural understanding. Drawing on research we have undertaken post-Cronulla with young people in some of Australia’s most diverse (and disadvantaged) neighbourhoods, we suggest that this approach to improving youth interculturality does not adequately account for the complex forms of sociality that exist in multicultural youth cultures. We illustrate how routine and intimate intercultural engagements are interwoven with forms of discord, some of it racialised and racist, but not always destructive of simultaneous positive fellow-feeling. We argue for greater attention to the multiple lines along which youth affiliate, connect and also differentiate themselves that inform their practices of inclusion and exclusion beyond lack of cultural understanding.

History

Journal

Journal of intercultural studies

Volume

38

Issue

3

Pagination

284 - 300

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Location

Abingdon, Eng.

ISSN

0725-6868

eISSN

1469-9540

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2017, Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group