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(Dis)ordering teacher education : from problem students to problem-based learning

Version 2 2024-06-17, 07:39
Version 1 2014-10-28, 09:29
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-17, 07:39 authored by T Gale
This paper takes issue with the 'disabling' of students enrolled in teacher education courses, perpetrated by definitions of students' learning disorders and by the structures and pedagogies engaged by teacher educators. Focusing on one case, but with relevance for similarly affected systems, the paper begins by outlining the changed student entry credentials of Australian universities and their faculties of education. These are seen as induced by a shift from elite to mass provision of higher education and the particular effect on teacher education providers (especially those located in regional institutions) of the politics of government funding and the continuing demand for teachers by education systems. While these changed conditions are often used to argue an increased university population of students with learning disorders, the paper suggests that such arguments often have more to do with how student problems are defined by institutions and how these definitions serve to secure additional government funding. More pertinently, the paper argues that such definition tends to locate the problem in individual students, deferring considerations of teacher educators' pedagogy and the learning arrangements of their institutions. The paper concludes that the place to begin addressing these issues of difficulty would seem to be with a different conception of knowledge production.

History

Journal

Journal of education for teaching

Volume

26

Pagination

127-138

Location

Oxon, England

ISSN

0260-7476

eISSN

1360-0540

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2000, Taylor & Francis

Issue

2

Publisher

Routledge