Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN AUSTRALIAN SCHOOLS: Longing for Belonging

report
posted on 2023-06-19, 06:08 authored by Jill Blackmore, Ly TranLy Tran, Catherine Beavis, Leonie Rowan, Trevor Mccandless, Caroline Mahoney, Cath Moore, Trang Hoang, Manaia Chou-Lee, Aida Hurem, Huyen BuiHuyen Bui
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN AUSTRALIAN SCHOOLS: Longing for Belonging

History

Pagination

1-87

Language

eng

Research statement

Background Internationalisation in different forms, including interaction with global, national and local dimensions, has been a key policy and practice in higher education and is increasingly common in the school sector (Fielding & Vidovich, 2017; Knight, 2012). Constructed as a concept in the literature and as a strategy by education providers, internationalisation has become a key feature in higher education and an emerging phenomenon in the school sector, driven by a combination of political, economic, socio-cultural and educational rationales (de Wit, 2020). Contribution This project sought to analyse the transnational relationships that connect international students in Australian secondary schools to different people and places in both physical and on-line social spaces, and how these intersect with and are changed by students’ experiences and choices during the critical teenage and school years of Years 10-12. The mixed method longitudinal study involved the use of environmental scans, interviews, focus groups and a survey to investigate international students’ sense of belonging and online and physical connectedness, their sense of self, relationships, and aspirations. Significance Internationalisation has been a key theme of policy at the state and federal level with a focus on intercultural competence and global citizenship. These concepts are embedded in the National Curriculum Framework and in state curriculum texts as an across-the-curriculum strand. Both international and domestic students are treated in policies as though they lacked a capacity for meaningful intercultural interaction unless it had to been learnt. This study indicated both domestic and international students were astutely aware of the need to negotiate intercultural relations and that internationalisation at home was evident in the subjects which more readily ac

Publisher

ARC

Place of publication

[Melbourne, Vic.]

Usage metrics

    Research Publications

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC