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OF

CAPTAIN A. B. THOMAS, R.N.,

NA VAL COMMANDANT,

THE VICTORIAN NAVY

•    FROM 1883 TO 1886; .

TOGETHER WITH

REGrTJLA_TI03SrS

PERMANENT NATAL FORCES AND NATAL BRIGADE.

$2 Jlnthoritn :

• Oils FERRES, ( OVERNMENT PRINTER, MELBOURNE. 1886.

A. 826.—200.




H.M.V.S. Nelson,,

Port Melbourne, 12th October, 1886.

■Sir,

In compliance with your request, I have the honour to furnish you with a report on the Victorian Navy from 1883 to 1886.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

A. BRODRICK THOMAS,

Naval Commandant.

The Honorable

The Minister of Defence.

a .








THE VICTORIAN NAVY

FROM

1883 TO 1886 INCLUSIVE.

In 1883, the Victorian Navy consisted of the Cerberus armour-clad turret ship, armed with four 18-ton M.L.R. guns, and the Nelson, wooden steam frigate, carrying twenty 61-pr. M.L.R., two 7-inch 68-pr. M.L.R., and eight 32-pr. smooth-bore guns.

These ships were manned by a permanent force of 122 officers and men, and a Naval Reserve, since called the Naval Brigade, consisting of 200 officers and men.

The condition of the Cerberus was very good, this vessel having just being supplied with new boilers, which enabled her to steam 10*5 knots.

The hull of the Nelson was in a sound condition, but the boilers were bad. The pressure has since been reduced to 13 lbs., and she is only able to steam 7 knots ; this would, however, be sufficient to enable her to take up the station that has been selected for her in case of war, and arrangements have been made to give additional protection to the officers and crew.

The possibility of being sunk by an enemy’s fire need not be taken into account, as it is intended to place her in very shallow water.

Her masts and yards were very defective, and have since been removed, with the exception of the mainmast, which was in good condition. •

A pole topmast and small j'ard for signalling purposes have been fitted to the mast.

The Nelson was, however, admirably suited for officers and men to live in, and for instructional purposes.

Quarters were accordingly built for the Captain and Heads of Departments, and the large after-cabin on the main deck has been specially fitted as an instruction room, and has been supplied with every appliance for giving instruction in Torpedo and Gunnery work and Electricity and Submarine Mining.

It is also furnished with numerous plans, drawings, and models, and charts for instruction in local navigation.

In June, 1884, the gunboats Victoria and Albert and the first-class torpedo boat Childers arrived in Victoria.

These gunboats were built by Sir Win. Armstrong and Co., and armed with K.B.L. guns and machine guns of the latest description.

The Childers Avas built by Messrs. Thornycroft, and fitted to fire 15-inch Whitehead torpedoes from bow-tubes or air-guns.

In March, 1884, the Batman and Fawkner, tAvo steam hopper barges, intended to carry silt from the dredges in Hobson’s Bay to sea, arrived.

These vessels have been specially strengthened whilst building, to enable them to carry a gun forward. A 64-pr. Avas mounted on each on their arrival, but these have since been replaced by G-iuch R.B.L. Armstrong guns, and they have also been supplied Avith machine-guns.    ,

Steel plating, 3 inches thick, has been placed on these vessels’ sides opposite the engines and boilers, and accommodation has been fitted for officers and men, and shell-rooms and magazines built.

In November, 1885, the G.annet, a poAverful 12-knot steam tuer, arrived, and has been armed and fitted in the same manner as the Batman and Faiokner.

These three Amssels belong to the Harbour Trust, the Government having the use of them for the periodical drills afloat and in case of Avar.

In July, 1884, the Nepean and Lonsdale, second-class torpedo boats, were brought out on the deck of a ship : they are each fitted to fire two 14-inch Whitehead torpedoes by steam impulse.

As there Avas considerable delay in getting orders for Whitehead torpedoes fulfilled, these boats Avere each fitted with two SAving spar torpedoes, having a make-and-break circtiit capable of firing the torpedoes from 5° before to 15° abaft the beam.

Since this was done, a large number of W hitehead torpedoes have arrived in the colony.

Two fast steam launches, viz., the Commissioner and the Citstoms, belonging respectively to the Harbour Trust and the Customs Department, were similarly fitted.    .

Plans of dropping gear for Whitehead torpedoes were, by permission of Admiral Tryon, procured from H.M.S. J\ elson, and sets supplied to the Childers, Commissioner, and Customs.

In March, 1886, the Gordon, 14-knot, turn-about torpedo boat, arrived, fitted with dropping gear and Nordenfelt gun, and with shield for protection of the crew.

In July, 1886, a 12-knot screw steamer, the Lady Loch, was launched in the Saltwater river. She was built for the Customs Department, and will be equipped with the same armament as the Harbour Trust vessels.

Of six 6-inch R.B.L. guns which were ordered for Naval purposes, four have thus been distributed among the Harbour Trust and Customs vessels, and it is intended to place another in the stern of the Victoria ; the sixth is at present temporarily mounted in one of the forts.    _

A Council of Defence, consisting of the Minister of Defence, the Naval and Military Commandants, the Captain of the Naval Brigade, the Senior Commanding Officer of Artillery of the Metropolitan District, and the Senior Commanding Officer of Infantry of the Metropolitan District, had been appointed .with power to re-organize the Defences, and shortly after the arrival of the gunboats the re-organization of the Naval I orces commenced.

New regulations, based on the Queen’s Regulations and Admiralty Instructions within the limits of the Discipline Act, were framed and submitted to the Council ot Defence, and the regulations for the Naval Brigade revised.

The conditions under which the Naval Brigade serve require special regulations, but when afloat they are under the same regulations as the Permanent Force.

The regulations of the Permanent Force and of the Brigade have since been revised. The'establishment of officers and men, with the scale of minimum and maximum salaries and wages, and the annual increment, has been fixed.

The want of officers being much felt, the rank of Commander has been instituted, an additional Lieutenant and Sub-Lieutenant appointed, and several Petty Officers promoted to the rank of Warrant Officers ; these latter, in common with all executive officers, have to be thoroughly acquainted with the local pilotage. (See Appendix.)

The strength of the Permanent Force has been increased to 205 officers and men, and that of the Naval Brigade fixed at 305.

The ratings of Training Seaman and Naval Apprentice have been established, and by this means the places of men retired for age or discharged as unfit have been filled up.

A system of deferred pay has been introduced to compensate in a measure for the abolition of pensions, and a scale of age retirement for all ranks fixed.

All men who hold “ very good ” discharges from the Naval Forces are entitled to appointments under other Government departments, such as Customs Boat, Police Boat, Mail Boat, &c., &c. (See Appendix.)

The ratings of Gunnery and Torpedo Instructors, and of Torpedo men and Seamen Gunners, have been established, and 12 Instructors and 36 Torpedo men and Seamen Gunners have been rated after having passed through the same course as is laid down for Instructors, &c., in the Imperial Navy.    ■

The courses have, however, been of longer duration, as every candidate has had to pass both the Gunnery and Torpedo examinations, being ultimately selected for that for which they have shown themselves best qualified. All the above have to re-qualify every two years.

A Torpedo store has been erected at Williamstown, and an air-compressing engine and boiler placed in position. A site for a similar store has been selected in the neighbourhood of the Heads, and the air-compressing engine for it has just been received from England.

A considerable number of Whitehead torpedoes have arrived from England, but, owing to a portion of them being of the Fiume type, it was found necessary to alter the dropping gear, which was only arranged for the Royal Laboratory torpedo. Mr. Dann, torpedo gunner, has invented a universal dropping gear (capable of discharging any 11-inch torpedo), which is uow being experimented with.

Large stores and boat-sheds have been built at Williamstown for Naval purposes and Torpedo slips, and sheds for the Torpedo boats are in course of construction.

The Torpedo boats have hitherto been hauled up on a patent slip belonging to Government, but which is unnecessarily cumbrous for the purpose.

Drills of every description have been regularly and constantly carried out in all the ships, and special attention has been paid to practical torpedo work, the torpedo classes, under Lieut. Hutchinson, having fired 222 shots with Whitehead torpedoes at a target, between July, 1885, and July, 1886. (See Appendix.)

Frequent opportunities have been giveu for target practice, and prizes have been competed for with satisfactory results. An annual supply of ammunition for the above purpose has been authorized by Defeilce circular. (See Appendix.)

A considerable number of men have been trained as Signalmen in the different descriptions of signalling by day and night.

Fleet manœuvres have been carried out to a certain extent, in order to accustom officers to handle their ships, and to give them confidence.

All the ports in Victoria, from Portland to Western Port, have been visited, some of the vessels being entirely officered and manned by the Naval Brigade.

The Naval Brigade drill-rooms at Sandridge and WilHamstown have been supplied with rifled breech-loading guns and machine-guns, and plans, drawings, &c., and models of breecli-loading guns, are being made for drill purposes.

New drill-rooms are about to be constructed on sites nearer the sea, and more suitable for Naval purposes than the two which are now in use.

Books and ■ pamphlets of instruction have-from time to time been published, ami a new “Manual, Victorian Naval Forces,” has recently been issued, which contains full information respecting the armament of the ships of the Victorian Navy, navigation, and other subjects.

Examinations to qualify officers for promotion have been held, and lists of subjects for examination for the different ranks have been issued in General Orders and attached to the Regulations.

The rating of Midshipman has been established in the Naval Brigade, and four young gentlemen have been appointed on probation for six months, at the end of which time they have to pass the examination as laid down in the regulations before being confirmed in their rank.

On general Drill days, at Inspection, and during the Easter cruise, a proportion of permanent officers and men are stationed in each vessel and the complements are completed by the Naval Brigade ; and, as far as possible, the same men always go to the same ships, and are known as the permanent crew or the Naval Brigade crew of their respective ships.

At other times the permanent crews live on board the ships to which they belong, so that there is always an efficient nucleus of officers and men in each ship.

These are again stationed in reduced gun’s crews, to enable them to fight their ships on an emergency should any unforeseen circumstance prevent or delay the embarkation of the Naval Brigade.

The Torpedo men are similarly stationed, with warrant officers (all of whom have passed through the Torpedo course) in charge, and Torpedo Instructors as coxswains of the boats.

The Engineers of the boats have also to qualify in Torpedo work.

The officers of the Naval Brigade have served in the mercantile marine, and the Captain and all the Lieutenants hold Master’s certificates, besides in most cases being qualified pilots for the ports of Victoria. These officers are always available for service, as they now occupy positions in the Harbour Trust or other local departments, the Captain of the Naval Brigade being the Chief Harbour-master. The petty officers and men are recruited from the seafaring population of the Port, many of them having served in the Imperial Navy, and a considerable number have also served in the Victorian Navy, and joined the Brigade on being discharged from that Service.

The majority of the Brigade are employed in the tugboats, dredges, and other vessels belonging to the Harbour Trust, whilst others are employed as lumpers on the wharves, and the remainder in miscellaneous occupations. Physically they are a very fine body of men, are intelligent, and very amenable to discipline.

In consequence of the addition to the Victorian Navy of ships and boats armed with breech-loading guns and torpedoes, it was found necessary that all officers should pass an examination in Gunnery and Torpedo work, and a Defence circular was issued to that effect. (See Table E. to the Permanent Regulations.)

Opportunities were given to Naval Brigade officers to take up their quarters afloat, in order to enable them to qualify, and a special examination for probationary Midshipmen was promulgated by General Order. (See Appendix.)

During August and September, 1886, five officers and forty seamen of the Naval Brigade were selected to undergo a special course of Torpedo work, and were formed into classes and sent to Geelong as part complements of the gunboats Victoria and Albert, where they were instructed in practical Torpedo work from first and second class boats and from the Gordon.

Attention has been paid to the supply of ammunition, and over 200 rounds have been received for each breech-loading gun and for the Cerberus guns ; and the same number of cartridges have been filled.

At present, the Nelson has over 100 rounds per gun, hut an additional supply has been ordered, as a considerable amount of 64-pr. ammunition is annually expended in target practice.

There has been no difficulty up to the present in obtaining recruits for the Naval Forces.    _

In 1883, about 60 per cent, of the seamen had served in the Imperial Navy, but many of them had to be retired owing to their age, and younger men, either from the mercantile marine or natives of the colony who had some sea experience, were entered as tiain-

ing seamen.    .

A few young men of good character, who had obtained tlieii discharge from the Imperial Navy, have also been engaged, but the proportion of men-of-wars men has been reduced to 2o pei cent.

The colonial recruits have turned out very well, and several of them have become Seamen Gunners and lorpedo men, and three have been made Instructors.

During the preparations for war in 1885, authority was given to engage 15 additional officers and 87 men for the Permanent Force and 48 men for the Naval Brigade.    _    _

These were procured in a few days. Numbers of appplications were received from all parts of the colonies, principally from retired officers and men of the Imperial iNavy, and the seafaring population of the Port came forward in a very creditable manner.

The required number was .selected, and in the case of the officers several were, by consent, placed on the Unattached Bist.

These officers and men were engaged for six months, after which many of the latter were retained to fill vacancies caused by the increased establishment.

The engineers and stokers are only kept up to a peace footing, but on several occasions full complements have easily been obtained from the Harbour Trust and the shipping firms of the Port.

During the Easter cruises, the ships and torpedo boats have been stationed to defend the Heads and the South and West Channels, acting in concert with the forts ; and a system of communication between ships and forts has been established, which enables information as to an enemy’s movements, either by land or sea, being conveyed from one to the other between all parts of Port Phillip and the military positions on shore.

Sham engagements between the ships and the forls, and between one portion of the squadron and the other, have been carried out, and the officers of the torpedo boats have had numerous opportunities of attacking vessels proceeding at a high rate of speed.

and of becoming acquainted with the sheltered positions at the entrance to the Port, from which they can rush out to attack an advancing foe or to which they can retire for safety.

Manœuvres have taken place by night as well as by day in the narrow channels, and the ingenuity of officers and men tested in resisting the attacks of torpedo boats, and in placing obstacles to frustrate or hinder the advance of an enemy’s ships or boats.

The time occupied in performing evolutions has been carefully noted, which has created a wholesome rivalry between the different ships, and has added considerably to the smartness and efficiency of the squadron.    •

The routine of the Imperial Navy has been carefully followed both at sea and in harbour, and every endeavour bas been made to accustom officers and men to the conditions of active service.

Captain Fullarton has most ably and zealously carried out the general management, as well as the drills and instruction, of the Naval Ilrigade, and has at all times been of the greatest assistance, both afloat and ashore, and to his energy and example is due the principal credit of the great improvement in the general efficiency of the Naval Brigade.    .

He has been well supported by his officers, petty officers, and seamen, who have shown their zeal by the manner in which they have devoted themselves to the study of new subjects, and have proved their ability in frequent practice.

Where fault has been found, it has generally been due to want of sufficient opportunities for drill, and shows the urgent necessity of assembling the Naval Forces for drill afloat for a longer unbroken period than the four days now devoted to it at Easter (the only occasion on which the Naval Brigade is assembled for drill afloat for more than one day), which should undoubtedly be extended to at least ten or fourteen days.

In all work connected with the Permanent Force, Commander Collins has shown himself a zealous and efficient officer, with a thorough knowledge of his duties, great tact, and considerable powers of organization, which are of great value in so scattered a force.

Great praise is due to Lieut. Hely-Hutchinson for the progress made in Torpedo work ; and to him and to Mr. Dann, Torpedo . Gunner, as well as to the intelligence and attention of the officers and men who have been through the Torpedo classes, is due the credit of so large a proportion of the Naval Forces having become qualified in Torpedo instruction.

IB

The condition of the engines of the different ships is very creditable to Mr. Huysmans, Chief Engineer, and to his staff, the number of vessels and the different descriptions of engines of the squdron requiring constant care and attention.

The officers, petty officers, seamen, and others of the Permanent Force have zealously and intelligently performed their duties, and great progress has been made in all drills and instruction.

The general conduct of the Force has been excellent, and punishments have been rare.

A. BRODRICK THOMAS,

September, 1886.    Naval Commandant.

APPENDIX.

Defence Department, Melbourne,

15th April, 1885.

(.Extract from '•''The Discijoline Act 1883.”)

Section 13. All persons now or hereafter to be Persons who engaged to serve in the Naval or Military forces of yelrs^o'have'Victoria, and who have served for a period of not less preference in than five years, shall be entitled at the expiration of to n^n-ctericai such period to be employed in the non-clerical divi- division, sion of the Public Service, on fulfilling all requirements as to examination and insurance for persons entering such division, and such persons shall be entitled to be appointed to any vacancy which may occur therein in priority to all other persons whatsoever-

Defence Circular No. 36.—loth February, 1886.

ESTABLISHMENTS OF RATINGS FOR GUNNERY AND TORPEDO INSTRUCTORS AND MEN.

Naval Forces.

With the view of increasing the efficiency of the Naval Service, and of encouraging the men to thoroughly qualify themselves in Torpedo and Gunnery instruction, and also of establishing an instructing class of men permanently in the Service of the

«Government of Victoria, tlie plau existing in the Royal Navy, viz., that of giving an increased rate of pay to such men as are found to be duly qualified, is adopted : —

(1.) Twelve rates of Gunnery and Torpedo Instructors are established, with an allowance of 6d. per diem, and permission to wear a gilt badge, “ torpedo and gun/’

(2.) Thirty-six rates of Seamen Gunners, and Torpedo men are established, with an allowance of 4d. per diem, and permission to wear a silvered badge, “torpedo and gnu. ’

Cost.

£ s. d. 109 10    0

219    0    0

11 10 0


£340    0    0


12 (twelve) Instructors, at 6d. per diem    ...

56 (thirty-six) Seamen Gunners and Torpedo men, at 4d. per diem ...    ...    •••

Probable cost of Badges ...    ...    •••

Total    ...    ...

F. T. SARGOOD,

Minister of Defence.

• N.B.—Defence Circular No. 24, of the 1st August, 1885, is

hereby cancelled.

VICTORIAN NAVAL FORCES.

Number of Drills. 664 389

234 149 109

235 12

262 20 386

Number of Shots Fired.


General Return .of Drills during past Year, 1st July, 1885, to 1st July, 188(1. Permanent Force.

Description of Drill.

Heavy gun ...    ...

Rifle and field exercise Cutlass and pistol ...

Machine gun    ...

&c.


Ammunition    ...

General drills—Quarters, man and arm boats, tire stations,

Target practice,    heavy guns

Signals ...    ...    •••

Torpedo attack    ..

Torpedo instruction and drills

Target practice, with V hitehead torpedoes

VICTORIAN NAVAL FORCES.

General Return of Drills during past Year, 1st July, 1S85, to 1st July, 18S6.

Naval Brigade.

Description.

Number.

Heavy gun......... ......... ... ... ...

157

Rifle and field exercise ... ... ... ... ... ......

243

Cutlass and pistol ... ... ......... ... ... ...

213

Machine gun ...... ... ... ... ... ... ...

63

Ammunition ......... ... ... .... ... ...

28

General quarters......... ... ... ... ... ...

24

Target practice ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

10

Target practice (rifles) ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

14

Special mustei’s ...... ... ... ... ... ... ...

10

Torpedo drills ... ...... ... ... ... ... ...

32

Gunnery lectures ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Inspection afloat by Rear-Admiral Tryon, C.B , November 9th, 1S85. Inspection afloat by the Naval Commandant, May 24th, 1886.

6

ANNUAL ISSUE OF AMMUNITION, ETC., TO THE NAVAL FORCES OF VICTORIA, WITH COST OF SAME.

Nature of Guns.

Number

of

Rounds.

Cost per Round.

Estimated

Value.

8-in. B.L. .........

14

£ s. d. -7 13 0

£ s. d. 107 2 0

6-in. B.L. .........

38

3 1 0

115 18 0

13-pr. B.L. ... ... ...

100

£73 per 100

73 0 0

9-pr. B.L. .........

100

£62 13s. per 100

62 13 0

10-in. R.M.L. .........

20

£4 12s. each

92 0 0

Machine Gun, Ball, Nordenfelt, 1-in., Steel ... ... ...

500

£50 per 1,000

25 0 0

Machine Gun, Gatling, -45 bore

1.000

£6 15s. per 1,000

6 15 0

Saluting and Exercise, 8 lb. charges .. ... ...

150

5s. per lb.

25 0 0

Saluting and Exercises, 6 lb. charges .. ......

150

5s. per lb.

18 15 0

Small-arm Ammunition-Cartridges—Ball, Rifle, M.-H. Rifle ... ... ... ...

36,000

£3 7s. Id. per 1,000

120 15 0

Cartridges—Blank, Rifle, M -H. Rifle ... ... ... ...

10,500

£1 5s. 8d. per 1,000

13 9 0

Cartridges—Fistol, Revolver, Enfield .........

1,000

£2 7s. 4d.-per 1,000

2 7 Ò

Add 15 percent, for expenses

£

662 14 0 99 8 0

General Total

......... £

762 2 0

EXAMINATION FOR PROBATIONARY MIDSHIPMEN. Navigation.

1.    To be able to write a legible hand.

2.    To understand the first five rules of Arithmetic.

3.    The use of Logarithms.

4.    The use of the Sextant with its adjustments.

5.    To be able to take observations, and to find the Index error.

6.    To be able to work a course and distance, and a day’s work; and to lay off courses and a ship’s position on the chart.

7.    To be able to find the longitude by Sun chronometer.

8.    To understand the use of the artificial horizon.

Gunnery.

1.    To have a good general knowledge of the fittings and working of the Cerberus turrets.

2.    To have a good general knowledge of the E.B.L. guns of the Victorian Navy.

3.    To know the weight of charges and projectiles and their distinguishing marks.

4.    To be able to perforin the Manual and Firing Exercise.

5.    To be able to perform the Cutlass Exercise.

Seamanship.

1.    To pull an oar.

2.    To handle a boat under oars or sail.

3.    To mark a lead line, and heave the lead.

4.    To understand the rule of the road, and to^steer a ship.

5.    To be acquainted with the different compartments of all the ships in the Victorian Navy.

6.    Knotting and splicing.

7.    To rig a derrick, and to calculate the purchase required to

lift a given weight.    .

8.    To understand the Naval Code of Signals, and toTe able to signal by Morse or Semaphore.

9.    To be a good swimmer.

VICTORIAN NAVAL FORCES.

Officers on the Active List.

Name.

Seniority.

Captains. / Alan B. Thomas, R.N. (Naval Commandant) <

R. Fullarton, V.N.B.* (Captain Commanding the Victorian Naval Brigade)

11th June, 1882 (as Captain R.N.).

13th August, 1883 (as Naval Commandant).

1st March, 1S71.

Commander.

R. H. M. Collins, V.N.t (Retired, R.N.)......

24th December, 1884.

Lieutenants.

G F. Dennis, V.N.B................

Honorable P. M. Hely-Hutchinson, R.N., Torpedo Lieutenant

G. Robertson, V.N.B.......... ... ...

J. Scott, V.N.B...............

G. Tickell, V.N.B................

T. B. Gough, V.N. .,............

30th July, 1877.

14th August, 1878.

2nd December, 1878. 1st October, 1879. 14th March, 1882. 11th April, 1885.

Sub-Lieutenants.

T. W. Smith, V.N.B...............

W. Lane, V.N. (on probation) ... ... ...

25th April, 1885. 12th July, 1886.

Midshipmen.

H. Gore-Stevenson, V.N.B. ... ... ... ...

C. Weir, V.N.B................

J. Harrison, V.N.B. ... ......... ...

A. Ray, V.N.B. (on probation) ... ... ..

3rd July, 1885. 23rd March, 1886. 23rd March, 1886. 12th July, 1886.

Chief Engineer.

E. J. Huysmans, V.N. (Retired Engineer, R.N.) ...

15th September, 1884.

Engineers.

J. L. Breaks. V.N. ... ... ...... ...

A. Harrow, V.N. ............ ...

T. R. Smith, V.N................

W. Forsyth, V.N................

D. Webster, V.N................

1st June, 1878.

20th April, 1882. 25th March, 1884. 17th October, 1885. 17th October, 1885.

* V.N.B., Victorian Naval Brigade. t V.N., Victorian Navy.

B

Officers on the Active List.

Name.

Seniority.

Staff Surgeon.

A. C. Stewart, V.N................

7th September, 1885.

Surgeon.

F. Clieetham, V.N.B. ... ... ... ... ...

20th April, 1885.

Paymaster.

J. A. Thompson, V.N. ... ... ... ... ...

18th February, 1878.

Assistant Paymaster.

T. J. B. McKail, V.N................

1st September, 1884.

Chief Gunner.

J. Smith, V.N. (Gunner R.N.) .........

18th June, 1883.

Gunners.

J. Tubb, V.N...................

1st July, 1871.

J. Frazier, V.N.B. ... ... ... ... ...

1st September, 1876.

J. Drewitt, R.N. ... ... ... ......

14th December, 1883.

E. Fry, V.N...................

10th April, 1885.

E. Hayes, V.N. ... ...............

10th April, 18S5.

T. Seabridge, V.N. .„ ... ... ... ... J. Prideaux, V.N. ... ... ... ......

23rd April, 1885.

23rd April, 1885.

J. Cockle, V.N.B................

24th April, 1885.

G. Richardson, V.N.B. ...... ... ...

5th May, 1885.

W. Raymond, V.N.B. ... ... ...... ...

5th May, 1885.

H. Jackson, V.N.B. ... ... ... ... ...

6th May, 1885.

Torpedo Warrant Officer.

C. A. Dann, V.N................

10th April, 1S85.

Chief Boatswain.

J. J. W. Frogley, V.N.............

1st July, 1S72.

Carpenter.

D. Mangan, V.N. ...............

1st May, 1SS6.

Cleric.

J. A. L Mullen, V.N. ... ... ......

11th August, 1885.

Officers on the Unattached List.

Name.

Seniority.

Captains.

C. A. D. Pasco, R.N................

18th January, 1866.

C. B. Payne, R.N. ... ... .........

1st April, 1871.

W. H. Panter, R.N. ... ...........

80th December, 1870.

C. T. Mandeville, V.N. (Retired Com. R.N.) ...

11th July, 1877.

Commanders.

W. F. A. H. Russell .........

1st October, 1873.

J. Evans ... ...... ... ... ... ...

1st June, 1876.

Lieutenants.

J. A. Ward, V.N................

11th April, 1885.

D. Elder, V.N.B. (Retired 18th March, 1882) ...

1st March, 1871.

Sub-Lieutenants.

A. M. Houston, V.N.B. ... . ...

16th March, 1886.

W. A. Holmes, V.N.B. ... ... ... ...

16th March, 1886.

Engineers.

A. Ross, V.N...................

31st March, 1885.

D. Cameron, V.N. ... ...

31st March, 1885.

W. McNiven, V.N....... ... ... ...

31st March, 1885.

Surgeons.

D. P. McLean, V.N.B. ... ...

1st March, 1871.

C. E. Gray, V.N.............

31st March, 1885.

J. D. Tweeddale, V.N. ......

31st March, 1885.

J. A. Kennison,V.N. ... ... ... ...

31st March, 1885.

A. Sutherland, V.N. ... ... ...

31st March, 18S5.

J. W. Florance, V.N. ... ... ... ... ...

31st March, 1885.

Assistant Surgeons.

H. R. Salmon ...... ... ...

31st March, 1885.

R. E. Weigall ... ... ... ...

31st March, 1885.

W. A. Wood .........

31st March, 1885.

A. J. Wood ............

31st March, 1885.

W. Daish ...... ...... ... ...

31st March, 1885.

Chief Electrician.

K. L. Murray ... ... ... ... ... ...

20th March, 1870.

B 2

LIST OF SHIPS AND TORPEDO BOATS, VICTORIAN NAVY.

No.

Name, Tonnage, &c., &c.

Armament.

State

of

Boilers.

Speed.

Complement of Officers & Men.

1

Cerberus, 2350 tons, Armoured Turret Ship

4 10-inch M.L.R. 18-ton Guns ; 6 Nordenfelt Guns

V.G., new, 1884

Knots.

10

150

2

Nelson, 2700 tons, Wooden Steam Frigate

2 7-inch 68-pr.; 20 64-pr. M.L.R.; 1 Gatling

Much IV orn

7

120

3

* Victoria, 450 tons, Steel-Gun Vessel

1 10-inch It.B.L. 25-ton Gun ; 212J-pr.; 2 Nordenfelts

V.G., new, 1884

12

47

4

Albert, 350 tons, Steel-Gun Boat

1 8-inch 12-ton, 1 6-inch 4-ton, R.B.L.; 2 9-pr.; 2 Nor-

ff ff

10

47

5

Gannet, 400 tons, Steam Tug......

denfelts

1 6-inch 4-ton R.B.L.; 2 Gatlings........

ft ff

12

25

6

Batman, 400 tons, Harbour Trust Steamer ..

„ ,, ,, 2 Nordenfelts ......

8}

25

7

Fawkner, 400 tons, Harbour Trust Steamer

,, ,, „ 2 Gatlings........

” 1886

25

8

t Lady Loch, 400 tons, Steel Screw Steamer ..

,, ,, ,, 2 Nordenfelts 2 15-inch Whitehead Torpedoes ; 2 14-ineh Whitehead

12

25

9

Childers, 1st Class Torpedo Boat

„ 1884

19

10

10

Nepean, 2nd Class Torpedo Boat

Torpedoes ; 2 Hotchkiss Guns 2 14-inch Whitehead Torpedoes; 2 Spar Torpedoes ..

ff ff

17

7

11

Lonsdale, 2nd Class Torpedo Boat

” ,’ 1 Nordenfelt Gun ..

1886

17

7

12

Gordon, Turn-about Torpedo Launch

14

8

13

Commissioner, Torpedo Launch

,, „ „

9

7

14

Customs, Torpedo Launch ......

” ” ” ........

9

7

* To be armed with 6-inch gun aft. t Lately launched ; armament in the Colony.

Permanent Force    .. 205

Naval Brigade    .. 305

510


Total

VICTORIAN PERMANENT NAVAL FORCES

REGULATIONS UNDER THE DISCIPLINE ACT 1870.

At the Executive Council Chamber, Melbourne, the thirteenth day of April and seventh day of June, 1886.

Present:

His Excellency the Governor in Council.

WHEREAS by The Discipline Act 1870 it is provided that the Governor in Council may make Rules and Regulations for the employment, removal, or dismissal, and for the better government of persons engaged by virtue of the said Act, and for enforcing good order and discipline among them, and otherwise for carrying out the said Act, and from time to time annul, alter, or amend the same, and substitute others in lieu thereof: And whereas the Governor in Council has from time to time, in pursuance of the said provision, made certain Rules and Regulations for the said purposes : And whereas it is expedient to amend the same, and to make further Regulations :

Now therefore his Excellency the Governor of Victoria, with the advice of the Executive Council thereof, doth by this present Order direct that the following Rules and Regulations shall he and the same are hereby made:—

Amendment of existing Rules and Regulations.

The Regulations heretofore made under the provisions of The Discipline Act 1870 shall, after the making of this Order, not apply to the Victorian Permanent Naval Forces.

The following Rules and Regulations shall apply to the Victorian Permanent Naval Forces:—

SECTION I.—DEFINITIONS.

1. Flie term “ Commandant,as used in the following Regulations, shall mean the Naval Commandant.

2.    The term “Officer” shall include Commissioned, Warrant, and Subordinate Officers, but shall not extend to Petty and Noncommissioned Officers, except when the word superior officer is used.

3.    The term “ Ship ” shall mean any vessel belonging or attached to the Victorian Naval Forces.

4.    The term “Commanding Officer”: the Captain or other officer on board or (if on shore with a party of men) in actual command at the moment.

5.    The term “ Executive Officer”: the officer next in command to the commanding officer carrying on the executive duties of the ship.

6.    The term “ Torpedo Officer”: the Lieutenant or other officer in charge of torpedo duties.

7.    “ Medical Officer”: the Staff Surgeon or Surgeon in charge of the Medical Duties.

8.    The term “Accountant Officer”: the Paymaster, Assistant-Paymaster, or other officer in charge of the pay and victualling duties.

9.    The term “Engineer”: the Chief or other Engineer Officer in charge of the machinery and boilers.

10.    “Warrant Officers” shall include chief gunners, chief boatswains, chief carpenters, and 1st and 2nd class gunners, boatswains, and carpenters.

11.    “Seamen Class” shall mean any officer, seaman, or others serving in the Victorian Naval Forces. (See Table A.)

SECTION II.—CONSTITUTION AND GOVERNMENT.

1.    The Permanent Force shall comprise such commissioned, warrant, and petty officers, men, boys, and naval apprentices, as mav from time to time be duly engaged, sworn in, and approved under the provisions of The Discipline Act 1870, and the Acts amending the said Act.

Entry of Officers.

2.    The Council of Defence shall, on the nomination of the Naval Commandant, or the officer appointed to perform the duties of Naval Commandant, recommend to the Governor in Council for engagement competent officers, who have previously served in the Impei’ial Regular or Auxiliary Forces, or iu any Colonial Naval Force, who may be considered suitable for appointment or promotion in the Victorian Navy, and who have passed the medical examination.

Retirement of Officers.

Lieutenants may

be retired at

age

of 45

Commanders

55

55

50

Captains

55

55

55

Engineers

55

55

50

Warrant officers

55

55

50

Entry of Men and Boys.

4.    All candidates must pass a medical examination.

5.    Boys may be engaged between the ages of 15 and 17, at 2s. per diem, and if found qualified at the age of 19, to perform the duties of Training Seaman, and may be rated as such seamen. Boys not so qualified shall be discharged.

6.    Boys will be sworn in for one year.

Entry of Naval Apprentices.

7.    Boys selected to undergo a course of training in the Victorian Navy shall be called “ Naval Apprentices.”

8.    Naval apprentices may be entered between the ages of 15 and 17 years.

9.    Naval apprentices may be selected for good conduct and ability to fill vacancies on the permanent list, either as boys or (if 18 years of age) as Training Seamen. Should they not be selected, they will be discharged on attaining the age of 18 years, or at any time if guilty of misconduct.

10.    Naval apprentices shall be sworn in for one year under The Discipline Act 1870, &c.

11.    Naval apprentices shall undergo a medical examination by the medical officers of the Naval Forces before being accepted.

12.    No boy shall be received as a naval apprentice who has at any time been convicted before a magistrate of any offence.

13.    Naval apprentices shall receive pay at the rate of One shilling a day, and an allowance of Thirty shillings on entrance for outfit; the cost of all clothing issued beyond the sum allowed to be deducted from their pay.

14.    The number of naval apprentices shipped is not to exceed thirty

Training Seamen.

15. Seamen between the ages of 20 and 25 years may be engaged as Training Seamen, on probation for six months, at 3s. 6d. per diem, and if found suitable in character and ability they may, at the expiration of this term, be re-engaged, and sworn in to complete five years from date of joining.

10. Training Seamen who have served their probationary term may, at or before the completion of their five years’ engagement, if found competent, be rated or re-engaged as Able Seamen, and sworn in for a further term of five years, at the pay of 4s. 6d. per diem and 6d. per diem deferred pay.

Able Seamen.

17.    Seamen to fill the vacancies for Able Seamen may be selected, as directed by the Naval Commandant, until the Training Seamen are duly qualified for that rating.

Time of Service.

18.    All officers, petty officers, seamen, and others, except Imperial officers, specially engaged cooks, stewards, boys, and naval apprentices, shall be sworn in for a period of five years.

Deferred Pay.

19.    The system of deferred pay shall apply to all ranks ranging between Officer and Training Seamen, except artisans, stokers, and servants.

Retirement.

20.    No petty officer, seaman, or others below the rank of warrant officer, except artisans and servants, shall be re-engaged above the age of 35 years.

21.    Officers and men now serving, who were above the specified age of retirement when the Regulations for the Victorian Naval Forces 1884 were framed, and dating from that time, to have the option of—

(a.) Being discharged and receiving compensation, as provided under clause 11 of The Discipline Act 1883, if entered prior to 24th December, 1881;

(b.) Or of continuing to serve, if under 50 years of age, for 5 years; if over 50 and under 55, uutil 55 years of age; and if over 55 years of age, for one year.

Purchase of Discharge.

22.    Petty officers, seamen, and others below the rank of warrant officer, shall be permitted, subject to the approval of the Naval Commandant, to purchase their discharge on the following terms :—

(a.) With less than 3 years’service ...    ...    £10

(6.) Over 3 and under 4 years ...    ...    ...    £5

(c.) Over 4 years ...    ...    ...    ...    -At/.

Standard Height.

23.    The standard height for men shall be 5ft. 6in., and the chest measurement 37 inches. Exceptions to the standard height and chest measurement may be allowed with the approval of the Naval Commandant. Boys, 15 years of age; height, 4ft. 11 in.; chest measurement, 29 inches. Naval apprentices, 16 years of age; height, 5 feet; chest measurement, 30 inches.

Swearing in.

24.    Every person engaged shall take and subscribe, before the Naval Commandant, a Justice of the Peace, or before any officer in command of any ship, the oath in the First Schedule of The Discipline Act 1870.

Pay and Allowances.

25.    All commissioned, warrant, petty officers, and others shall be entitled, subject to these Regulations, to receive pay and allowances according to the scale laid down in Table B. No annual increment shall accrue to any salary until the person in receipt of such salary has received the same for a full financial year. The right to receive such increment in any year shall depend upon the good anddiligeut conduct of the person to whose salary such increment is attached, and if in the opinion of the Naval Commandant the person is not entitled thereto he may issue an order to deprive such person of such increment, which shall in that case not be paid. Provided that the Minister of Defence shall, on appeal of such person, confirm or disallow such order.

Pay for Special Duty.

2G. Officers detached on special duty shall receive subsistance and travelling allowances, as per Table C.

Change of Residence.

27.    Every member shall give immediate notice to his commanding officer of any change of residence, or of the place to which letters and notices are to be addressed.

Concealment of Disease and producing False Papers.

28.    Any member who is discovered to have been, at the time of engagement, suffering from disease, or to have sustained injury which incapacitates him, and Avho has concealed such disease or injury, or who is discovered to have made any false representations, or to have produced any false papers on the occasion of engagement, shall be summarily dismissed, and will be liable to forfeit all claim to pay or other advantages of the service.

Ceremonies.

29.    All salutes and ceremonies shall be carried out in accordance with the rules and regulations of the Imperial Navy, as laid down in the Queen’s Regulations and Admiralty Instructions.

SECTION III.—DISCIPLINE.

1 Officers are to discountenance and suppress all cursing, swearing, drunkenness, gaming, rioting, and quarrelling ; all abusive and irritating language to inferiors ; all dissolute or disorderly conduct ; and in general everything tending to the disparagement of religion or to the promotion of vice and immorality.

2.    Officers will at all times, and under all circumstances, show an example of respect and obedience to their superiors, of unremitting attention to their duties, and of cheerful alacrity in performing it.

3.    Commanding officers will see that all the persons under their command obey the several instructions which are addressed to them, or which, when of a general purport, concern them. They will correct or report to their superiors any reprehensible conduct on the part of those under their command. They will notice their conduct and abilities, in order that they may be enabled to give them the recommendations they deserve, or, if called on, make correct reports of their merits. They will, whilst upholding the legitimate authority of all the officers under their command, check by timely rebukes any tendency they may notice to abuse of power, recommending by their example that firm but conciliatory manner of conducting duty which is the more sure way to gain the respect and confidence of the men.

4.    Should the Naval Commandant find it necessary to reprimand an officer or petty officer for any grave offence, he is to cause an entry of the particulars to be made in ihe log at the time, and the said entry is to be read to the officer concerned, and a note made in the log that such has been done.

Respect to Superiors.

5.    Every person in the Naval Forces is to conduct himself in the discharge of his duty with the utmost respect to his superior officers, whether attached to the same ship or not, and is on all occasions of meeting, passing, or addressing his superior officers, knowing them to be such, whether afloat or on shore, to pay them the accumstomed marks of respect.

6.    Officers and men of the Victorian Navy are to pay the customary mark of respect to the officers of the Military Forces when in uniform, and also to foreign officers.

Salutes.

7.    Salutes are to be made in a smart and decided manner. A •slovenly mode of saluting is disrespectful, and brings discredit upon the person saluting and also on the service to which he belongs.

8.    Officers of the Victorian Naval Brigade, though for the most part performing their duties on shore, are to be considered in all respects as officers of the Naval Forces and are entitled to the same marks of respect as those serving in the Permanent Forces.

Arrest.

9.    Any person who shall disobey orders, or otherwise misbehave, may be placed under arrest by the Naval Commandant, or, in his absence, the commanding officer.

10.    Arrest shall signify suspension from all duty until the case has been investigated and dealt with by the Naval Commandant; but if any emergency of the service should render it requisite that the person under arrest should be released without the charge against him being withdrawn, the commanding officer may give orders to that effect, and the person shall return to his duty accordingly, without prejudice to his future trial or the inquiry into the charge ou which he was placed under arrest.

rhe Discipline Act.

11. The Naval Discipline Act shall be read at least once a month to all officers and men serving in the Naval Forces, and no officers or men are to be sworn in until they clearly understand the regulations under which they engage.

Petty Officers.

12. Petty officers are to be granted every reasonable indulgence, and treated with consideration. Being placed in situations of trust, they are to be made to feel that confidence is reposed in them.

Grievances.

13.    If any member have cause to think himself aggrieved, he may represent the case to his commanding officer. Any appeal against the decision of the commanding officer will be made through the proper channel to the Commandant, and any further appeal will be made through that officer for transmission to higher authority.

Disrating, S,'C.

14.    The Commandant may summarily reduce in rank any petty officer, or may fine or dismiss any petty officer or others below the rank of petty officer, for misconduct, or may discharge any petty officer or others below the rank of petty (fficer.

15.    The Naval Commandant shall have power to enforce fines and other minor punishment according to the following scale :—

Offence.    Punishment.

("Drunkenness    ...    Fine    not exceeding    20s.

| Disrespect    ...    Fine    not exceeding    20s.

A.    Neglect of duty    ...    Fine    not exceeding    10s.

Breaking leave


... Fine of 5s. for every 12 hours over leave, not to exceed 20s.

Note.—Leave to be considered a privilege, to be withheld or granted as circumstances may admit, and may be withheld, for a period not exceeding 42 days, for breaking leave, or other offences against discipline.

B. Inattention at drill


Extra drill, not to exceed 2 hours a day for 7 days.

Caning (with clothes on) for the above or any serious offence (for boys only) not to exceed 12 cuts.

Note.—The Naval Commandant may give a written authority to any commanding or executive officer to inflict the following punishment:—

For A : Fine, not to exceed 5s.; stoppage of leave, not exceeding 14 days.

B : For the whole period.

16.    All cases of insubordination, disrespect, drunkenness, or behaving in a discreditable manner, on board or on shore, are to be reported without delay to the Naval Commandant.

17.    Any person subject to these Regulations found guilty of wilfully destroying, losing, or injuring, or through neglect suffering to be lost or injured, any Government property, shall, in addition to such of the above punishments as may be inflicted, be sentenced to make good such loss or damage.

18.    Any person who shall behave with violence, or shall use mutinous or abusive language, may be placed in irons, handcuffed, or locked in a cell.

19.    All persons regularly serving under the Discipline Act will be subject to be brought before the Court therein provided, if charged with any of the following offences:—Losing hazarding or stranding any ship, mutiny and sedition, violence to superiors, disobedience of orders, disrespect to superior officers, desertion, theft, absence without leave, sleeping on post, breaking arrest, drunkenness, malingering neglect of duty, or any disgraceful conduct.

Absence through Illness.

20.    Any person remaining on shore without leave, owing to illness, is without delay to send notice to his commanding officer, who will send the sick-bay man to inquire into his case. In serious cases, and when unable to communicate with his ship, a medical certificate must be sent. Persons failing to comply with these Regulations will be liable to the penalties for leavebreaking.

Desertion.

21.    If any person belonging to the Naval Forces shall absent himself without leave, he shall be checked in the books the day following his absence; and at the expiration of seven days, if he have not returned, shall be deemed to have deserted, and shall be liable to the penalties for desertion.

SECTION IV.—RANK AND COMMAND.

# I officers of Her Majesty’s Naval Forces shall be divided into two branches, viz., a, Military and a Civil Branch. The Military Branch, comprised of the undermentioned officers, shall rank in the following order:—

Commandant.

Captain.

Commander.

Lieutenant.

Sub-Lieutenant.


Chief Gunner. Chief Boatswain. Gunner. Boatswain. Midshipman.

2. 1 he Civil Branch shall consist of the undermentioned officers, and they shall rank in the following order with officers of the Military Branch, as herein expressed:—

Denomination.

Service.

To Rank with—

Inspector of Machinery

of S years’ service

Captain of 3 years’ seniority

55 5 5

under 8 years ...

Captain under 3 years

Paymaster ... ...

of 15 years ...

Commander, according to date of commission

Chief Engineer ...

of 10 years ...

Commander, according to date of commission

Staff Surgeon ... Paymaster ... ... Chief Engineer ...

over S, under 15 under 10 ...

Lieutenant over 8 years

5 5 5 5

Paymaster ... ... Surgeon ... ...

under 8 ...

Lieutenant under 8 years

Assistant-Paymaster ...

Engineer ... ...

of 8 years ...

Assistant-Paymaster... Engineer ... ...

under 8 years ... under S years ...

Sub-Lieutenant

Chief Carpenter ...

with, but after, Sub-Lieutenant

Carpenter ... ...

with, but after, Gunners and Boatswains

Clerk ......

Midshipman.

Officers of the Civil Branch.

3. Notwithstanding the relative rank and authority conferred by these Regulations on officers of the Civil Branch, they are in all sucli matters and details as relate to the service on which they are employed, the duties of the Fleet, and to the discipline and interior economy of ships, to be subject to the authority of officers of the Military Branch; and in no case shall they be deemed to be superior in rank, or take precedence of, the officer appointed to command the ship or establishment in which they are employed, or the officer or other person on whom the command of such ship or establishment may properly devolve in the absence of the officer appointed to the command thereof.

4.    Officers of the Civil Branch are not to assume any Military command whatever, either afloat or on shore, but under the Captain or other superior officer they shall have all necessary authority within their own departments, and according to their relative rank, for the due performance of their respective duties, and they are to be obeyed accordingly by their subordinates.

Ship’s Company.

5.    Petty officers, seamen, and others shall rank and command as laid down in Table D. Those printed in italics not entitled to take Military command.

SECTION V.—INTERIOR ECONOMY.

Duties of Officers.—(Military Branch.)

Commanding Officer.

1.    The commanding officer is to thoroughly acquaint himself with the construction of the vessels in the Victorian Navy, the number of compartments, and the pumping and flooding arrangements; and, at least once a week, accompanied by the Engineer and Carpenter (if any), to inspect the ship, and ascertain whether she is, in all respects, complete, or whether she has any defects.

2.    He will observe, and cause to be observed, the precautions against fire as laid down on the fire station for the Victorian Navy.

3.    He is to be careful that lights are only allowed in the officers’ mess places and cabins, in accordance with the General Order.

4.    On no account or pretence whatsoever are spirituous liquors, varnishes, or other inflammable stores of any kind or description to be drawn off or moved from any cask, vessel, or package anywhere but on the upper deck, by daylight.

5.    No cotton waste, saturated with oil or grease, is to be allowed to accumulate. All oil and tallow are to be stored in the iron tanks supplied for the purpose. Cans or jars of oil or turpentine are never to be stowed in a warm place. A can or jar is liable to burst, or the cork to be forced out by the expansion of the oil or turpentine arising from the increase of its temperature.

6.    The paint-room is to be carefully inspected, and leaky vessels are at once to be replaced by sound ones, and the place kept properly clean and ventilated.

7.    At evening quarters, the responsible engineer, painter, or other persons are to ascertain that all the taps of oil or other inflammable fluids in daily use are properly turned off, and that there is no leakage.

H. Coal bunkers are to be frequently ventilated, and always before men are sent to work in them, and the coals kept free from wet.

9.    Pie will use his best endeavours to ensure cleanliness, dryness, and good ventilation, and will frequently examine the state of the holds in the lower parts of the ship; and when not perfectly clean and free from obnoxious smells, he will cause a thorough examination to be made, to detect or remove whatever may be likely to engender disease.

10.    He is to see that the men are properly clothed in the established uniform, that they are generally cleanly in their persons and dress, and that they are never suffered to remain in wet clothes, or sleep in wet bedding, when it can possibly be avoided.

1 1. He is to see that his ship is at all times prepared for immediate action, and that the officers and men on board, no matter whether reduced in numbers by leave being given or other circumstances, are stationed at the guns, and that all arrangements are made for the rapid supply of ammunition from the magazine and shell-rooms; and every evening, when a portion of the crew have gone on leave, hoses are to be screwed on, and pumps rigged, and the watch on board told off for their station, in case of fire.

12.    He will see that the routine of drills is properly carried out, and use his utmost endeavours to encourage the officers and men under his command to become thoroughly acquainted with their various duties.

Officer of the Watch.

13.    The officer of the watch is responsible for the safety of the ship, subject, however, to any special orders he may have received from his commanding officer. He will on every occasion before taking charge of a watch, when the ship is in squadron, see that she is in her station ; if out of the station, he will not take charge until the commanding officer has been informed, and his order received to take charge. In every such case, the bearings and distance of the next ahead, and of the flag, are to be noted in the log-book.

14. He will at all times, when at sea, as far as practicable, keep himself informed of the position of the ship, especially when approaching land or in pilot water ; whether land or lights are in sight, and, if not, whether any are likely to be seen ; and on all other particulars which may be of use in keeping the ship out of danger. If approaching land or pilot water, he is to see that the leadsmen are in the chains, and that the anchors and cables are clear.

lo. After taking charge of the watch, he is to be constantly on deck until properly relieved ; he is to see that the watch are alert, and attentive to their duties ; that every necessary precaution is taken to prevent accident from squalls ; that when approaching land or pilot water, casts of the lead, whether hand or deep sea, are obtained with sufficient frequency ; and that the ship is as perfectlv prepared for battle as circumstances admit. He is to be careful that the ship is properly steered, and that a correct account of her way, by the log being duly hove, and the distance made good, and the leeway, are noted in the deck log, together with every other occurrence worthy of notice, and all accidents occasioning loss of stores.

16.    He is, at the end of the watch, to sign the deck log-book properly filled up, and the signals made (if kept separately), with his initials ; and when the occurrences of the day have been entered in the ship’s log-book he will in the same manner place his initials at the end of each watch, in proof that the entries are correct.

17.    He is to see that the officers and men under his orders are constantly at their posts, and attentive to their duties. He will, when he takes charge at night, and at any other time he may think necessary, muster the watch and the lifeboat’s crew, and he will satisfy himself that the lifeboat is ready for lowering, and thatacom-pass, lantern, signal lights, water, and bread and rifle are in it.

18.    He is to be extremely careful to keep station when sailing with other ships; he will report at once to the commanding officer if unable to do so.

19.    He will take care that ; good look-out is kept for all signals, whether general or to the ship; that none are answered until

C

made out and understood ; that during the night the flashing apparatus, lanterns, and everything else necessary for making signals, are in good order and ready for instant use ; that the signal guns are loaded without shot ; and that, at sea, none but the authorized lights of the ship are visible, so as to prevent possible mistakes when night signals are being made.

20.    He is never to change the course without directions from the commanding officer, unless to avoid immediate danger.

21.    He will see that an officer or petty officer goes the rounds below every hour, and that no unauthorized smoking or other irregularities take place between decks. He will see that the helmsman thoroughly understands his duties, and he will carefully observe the rule of the road at sea to prevent collision. He will cause the well to be sounded at least every two hours.

Torpedo Officer.

22.    The torpedo officer is to take care that a uniform system of drill, as directed by the Naval Commandant, is strictly carried out, and that the maintenance and proper order of the stores supplied for torpedo service as well as of the torpedoes themselves are strictly adhered to, and that the officers and men having special duties in connexion with torpedoes are thoroughly conversant with those duties.

23.    He is to superintend all drills and instructions connected with torpedo work, and is to use his utmost endeavours to make the officers and men placed under his instruction thoroughly efficient.

Torpedo Warrant Officer.

24.    The torpedo warrant officer will assist in carrying out all torpedo drills and instructions, and will pay particular attention to keeping the torpedo boats, torpedoes, and all other stores connected with his department in a thoroughly efficient state and ready for service.

Gunner.

25.    The gunner is to make himself thoroughly acquainted with the construction, ventilation, and flooding arrangements of the magazines and shell-rooms, and assure himself that they are properly fitted, and that the magazines are perfectly dry before powder is received. Should he detect any appearance of dampness, he is to inform the commanding officer at once, that they may be properly dried.

26.    lie is to attend himself to the stowage of powder and shells, and when all are stowed he is to see that the battens and stanchions are fixed, that the months of all the cases are properly luted and secured, that the magazines and shell-rooms are in working order, and that the magazines are swept; and he is to take care that the men are out of the magazine and the lights extinguished in the light-room before he leaves.

27.    He is to take care that the cases of friction-tubes are stowed in lockers, properly constructed, in his storeroom, and on no account are the cases or any loose friction-tubes to be placed in the magazine. He is on no account to go into the magazine without being specially ordered. He is never to allow the magazine to be opened but by himself, a gunner's mate, or some other trustworthy officer or petty officer.

28.    He or the petty officer in charge is to be very careful to ascertain that persons who go into the magazine have no matches or anything else about them which can strike fire, and that every such person before entering either puts on the leather shoes supplied for the purpose or goes in without shoes. He is to instruct the men appointed to attend in the light-rooms in the right management of the lamps, so that inconvenience may not arise from an accumulation of grease, smoke, &c.

29.    He is never to keep powder in any other part of the ship than the magazine, except that which may be ordered by the commanding officer himself to be kept on deck, in cases properly secured, and placed under the charge of a sentry. He will take care, whenever he delivers cartridges from the magazine, that they are in cases properly shut.

30.    He will see, on going into action, that the leaden floors of the handing-rooms are covered with water, that the aprons and pockets are let down, that the lids of the powder cases are loosened, the screens hung round the magazine hatchways, and that there is a good supply of fresh air.

31.    He is never to return, or allow to be returned, wet or damp cartridges into the packages from whence they were taken.

32.    He or the gunner’s mate or other trustworthy person to whom the keys of the magazine, the handing-rooms, the light-rooms, or the shell-rooms, are entrusted, when the purpose for which they were received is accomplished, is himself to "lock the same very carefully, and return the keys to the commanding officer or to such officer as the commanding officer shall appoint to take charge of them.

C 2

33.    He is frequently to examine the state of the guns, sights, and carriages, that anything defective may immediately be repaired or exchanged. He is frequently to examine the rifles and all other small-arms, to see that they are kept clean and in every respect perfectly fit for service.

34.    He will take care that no leather articles issued in a brown condition, such as pouches, belts, magazines for cartridges, &c., are blackened.

35.    He is at all times to be particularly attentive to see that everything necessary for the service of the guns, and for boarders, firemen, and others, is ready to be supplied to all quarters.

36.    He is to take care that the lifebuoys are properly primed and ready for letting go, and that they are tested at least once a month.

37.    He will, on proceeding to sea, take care that a box containing rockets, signal lights, &c., and a rifle, are placed in a quarter or stern boat.

38.    He is to be responsible for all gunner’s stores placed under his charge, and is to exercise a proper economy in the expenditure of them.

39.    lie will enter the same in his Expense Book, which is to be submitted to the Naval Commandant the first week in every month.

Boatswain.

40.    The boatswain is to have charge of, and carefully examine, the rigging of the vessels of the squadron.

41.    He is to be responsible for all boatswain’s stores placed under his charge, and is to exercise a proper economy in the expenditure of them.

42.    He will enter all stores in his Expense Book, which is to be submitted to the Naval Commandant the first week in every month.

43.    He will see that the anchors and cables are kept in good working order, and that the spare anchors are ready for letting go; and he will be responsible, subject to the commanding officer, for the general efficiency of the rigging of the ships.

44.    He is to be particularly careful that the boats are well secured, the falls kept in good condition, and the boats themselves ready for service.

45.    He will instruct the training seamen and boys in seamanship, and examine seamen for higher rates.

Duties op Officers.—(Civil Branch.)

Engineer Officer.

46.    The Engineer Officer is to have the charge, and he responsible for the maintenance in a state of efficient working order, and as far as may be of readiness for immediate use, of—

(a.) The machinery and boilers of the ships and boats.

(,b.) All the auxiliary engines, for whatever purpose fitted, (c.) Pumps connected with bilges or double bottoms, and pipes, cocks, and valves belonging to them.

(d.) Distilling apparatus.

(e.) Iron gun-carriages.

(f) Screw-lifting apparatus.

(g.) Turret-turning engines and gear.

(h.) Hydraulic machinery and gear for guns and turrets. (¿.) Ventilating, steering, and capstan engines and gear. (j.) Hydraulic jack.

(k.) Winches for hoisting projectiles, worked by steam. (/.) Water-tight doors and sluice-valves, including horizontal traps and flap doors, as well as verticle-hinged doors between decks.

(m.) Engine-room fire-extinguishing apparatus.

(n.) Instruments for telegraphing signals.

(o.) Whitehead torpedoes and submerged discharging tubes and gear.

And such other parts of the hull and double bottom as are in his charge, either wholly or jointly with other officers.

47.    He is, through the Commandant, to furnish the Engineer in charge of Ports and Harbours with such written reports or returns as he may require relative to the state of the machinery and boilers in his charge ; and whenever this officer visits the ship, he is to afford him every facility and all the information in his power, to enable him effectually to carry out the duties entrusted to him. He will take care, in regard to the spare gear, to observe the Instructions in the Steam Manual for Her Majesty’s Fleet on that head.

48.    He will be careful that the plugs to the discharge valves are always stowed as near as possible to the places on the ship’s side at which they would be applied ; they are always to be fitted in place when the ship is docked.

49.    He will take care that, whenever boilers are opened up,, sufficient time is given to allow any foul air to escape ; and that, before any one is allowed to enter the boilers or bunkers, the purity of the air is ascertained.

50.    He is to practice the greatest economy iu the consumption of articles in his charge, consistent with the efficient working and due preservation of the engines, taking care that they are only used for the purposes for which they shall have been issued.

Accountant Officer.

51.    The books and returns which are to be kept by the accountant officer are to be as follows, viz.:—-

Books :

Cash Book.

Salary and Wages Book (comprising allowance for grog)

Deferred Pay and Fines and Forfeitures.

Register of Correspondence Inwards.

Register of Letters Outwards.

Muster Book.

Book of Stores from England.

Register of Accounts.

Returns :

Deferred Pay.

Fines and Forfeitures.    +

Dismissals, Appointments, and Promotions.

Sale of Clothing.

Monthly Return of Strength of Navy.

52.    In future, all accounts for stores approved by the Minister of Defence, accompanied by the orders on the contractors, are to be forwarded direct to the Controller of Stores, in order that they may be recorded against the Naval Branch. At the end of each month, a copy from the abstract book of all the entries for the month from the expense books of all Government stores is to be seut to the Controller of Stores, after having been approved by the Naval Commandant.

Canvpenter.

53.    The carpenter is to attend to the rigging of the pumps, to the care of the hose, to the sounding of the well and of the different compartments. He will take care to have always at hand such carpenter’s stores as may be required to repair the pumps.

54.    He is to lake care, as far as in him lies, to keep every part of the ships and all their fittings in the highest possible state of efficiency.

55.    He will report at once to the commanding officer whenever he is of opinion that any particular repairs or other work should be taken in hand, whether for preservation or to arrest further deterioration. He will take care that all the seams are frequently examined, and that when caulking is required it is well done, and that the oakum used is dry and in good condition.

56.    He is to be very careful to keep the sheathing of the holes, through which any funnels pass, in perfect order, to guard against the possibility of fire.

57.    He will carefully inspect the state of the masts and yards of the ships of the Victorian Navy, and also every part of the ships, and report any deficiency or defects he may discover.

58.    He is to exercise proper economy in tl.e expenditure of all stores placed in his charge, and will enter the same in his expense book, which is to be submitted to the Naval Commandant the first week in every month.

SECTION VI.—NAVIGATION.

1.    The senior officer is responsible for the safe conducting of the squadron, ships, or ship present with him, and acting in concert under his orders ; the senior officers in charge of divisions or columns being responsible for the ships under their immediate orders.

2.    The commanding officer is responsible for the safe conduct and steering of the ships.

3.    The officer ordered to undertake the navigating duties is, under the direction of the commanding officer, to have charge of the navigation of the ship ; and, whenever the ship is approaching the land or any shoals, the commanding officer is to take care that a good look-out is kept upon deck, and that soundings are carefully taken and continued until the safety of the ship’s position be clearly ascertained and secured.

4.    The commanding officer is to take care that the speed of the ship be reduced, where there is a possibility of doubt, to such a speed as shall ensure the leadsman getting correct soundings at every cast.

5.    If it shall appear that the ship has been run on shore, or brought into clanger of being run on shore, or wrecked, and that there has been any want of due care and precaution, or that the foregoing orders have been disobeyed, the commanding officer will be held responsible for neglect of duty.

Report of Touching Ground.

6.    In the event of the ship touching the ground, the commanding officer and officer for navigating duties are, by the first opportunity, to transmit a joint statement, through the Naval Commandant, for the information of the Minister of Defence, of every particular relating thereto, giving the rate at which she was going over the ground at the time she struck, the exact time she remained on shore, the nature of the bottom, the means taken to get her off, the injury they suppose she has received, the direction and force of the wind, the state of the weather, sea, and tide, the ship’s draught forward and aft, and the least depth of water under the stern, under the bows, and amidships, at any time while she remained on shore. This statement is to be accompanied by a copy of the log, a track chart, commencing from the date the ship last left port, and, if possible, by a clear and comprehensive plan of the place where the accident occurred.

Chronometer Journal.

7.    A chronometer journal, in the form supplied with the instruments, is to be kept by the officer in charge of the navigating duties. He will note in it the rate and error of each chronometer, when determined.

Daily Observations.

8.    Each Lieutenant, Sub-Lieutenant, and Midshipman, whether confirmed or acting, is daily, when at sea, to take sights to determine the latitude by meridian altitude, and the longitude by chronometer. They are to be worked out and delivered to the commanding officer shortly after noon.

9.    Night observations, to ascertain the latitude by observations of the moon, planets, or stars, are to be taken by these officers when on watch, and when it does not interfere -with other duties, and the results are to be noted on the deck log.

10.    Idle officer of the watch is in no case to go beloAv to work them out, unless properly relieved.

Compasses.

11.    The commanding officer and other officers of the ship are to keep a constant watch over the deviation of the compasses, caused by the attraction of the iron used in the construction of, or fittings in, the ship, and they are to make themselves thoroughly acquainted with, and be guided by, the practical rules relating thereto, supplied in every chart-box.

12.    All ships are to be swung at least once in each year, and azimuth and amplitude observations are also to be taken at sea for the same purpose.

13.    The commanding officer is responsible for all charts, barometers, chronometers, and all instruments that may be supplied for navigating the ship, and he is to see that the chronometers are wound up daily at 8 a.m.

14.    The officer of the forenoon watch—or, where there is no officer, the Quartermaster—is not to relieve the deck until he has ascertained that the chronometers have been wound up.

Collisions.

15.    Regulations to avoid collisions, as issued by the Board of Trade, are to be observed in the Victorian Naval Forces.

16.    In the event of collision, the commanding officer will, in addition to his special report, forward through the Naval Commandant, a special report to the Minister of Defence, in which he will deal specially with the following points:—

Time of collision.

Place of collision.

Force and direction of the wind.

State of weather.

State and force of the tide.

Course and speed of the ship.

Time when other vessel was first seen.

Lights, if any, carried in the ship.

Lights, if any, of the other vessel when first seen.

Distance anil bearing of the other vessel when first seen.

Whether any lights of the other vessel, other than those first seen, came into view before the collision.

What measures were taken, and when, to avoid the collision.

The parts of each vessel which first came into contact.

SECTION VII.—COMMISSIONS AND PROMOTIONS.

Examination of Officers.

Sub-Lieutenants.

1.    Candidates for Sub-Lieutenants, having not less than four years’ sea time, and under the age of 25 years, may be engaged, as Sub-Lieutenants on probation for six months, during which time they will, if not previously qualified, be required to pass the Board of Trade examination for Second Mate, and also the examination in gunnery, torpedo, and other subjects, as laid down in Table E. Under special circumstances, the Naval Commandant may extend the term of probation to one year.

2.    Sub-Lieutenants may, after being confirmed in that rank, present themselves for examination for the rauk of Lieutenant. They will be required to pass the Board of Trade examination for Master, and in gunnery, torpedo, and other subjects, as laid down in Table E ; and, after two years* service in the rank of SubLieutenant, they will be eligible for promotion to Lieutenant as vacancies occur.

3.    Officers wall be required to re-qualify in gunnery and torpedo every two years.

Engineers.

4.    Engineers shall produce certificates showung that they are competent to take charge of the boilers and machinery of any of the vessels in the Victorian Naval Forces.

5.    No Engineer will be eligible for promotion to Chief Engineer unless he holds a first-class certificate.

Warrant Officers.

6.    Men selected for promotion to the rank of Warrant Officer will be required to pass the examination laid down in the Queen’s Regulations.

SECTION VIII.—INSTRUCTION OF MEN AND

BOYS.

1. Monthly returns of drills and inspections shall be sent to the Naval Commandant from each ship and from the officer instructing the torpedo class.

2.    Boys and apprentices are to be under instruction, either in seamanship, gunnery, or torpedo work, at least two hours every day, excepting Saturdays and Sundays.

3.    Training classes for gunnery and torpedo instructors and men will be constantly held, as per Table E.

SECTION IX.—UNIFORM.

1.    Officers and men belonging to the Victorian Permanent Naval Forces shall wear the uniform prescribed in the Queen’» Regulations for the officers and men of the Imperial Service, with the following modifications:—

In the Executive Branch, instead of the loop worn on the upper stripe, a diamond is to be substituted, of f inch inside diameter.

Chief Warrant Officers to wear inch lace, with same device.

Warrant Officers to wear \ inch lace, with same device.

In the Civil Branches, the uniform is to be same as in the Imperial Service, excepting that all officers in the Civil Branches will wear a silver star, of the same dimensions as that worn on the epaulettes, on the centre of the cuff, one inch above the distinguishing stripe or stripes.

Petty officers, men, and boys, same as in the Imperial Navy.

Officers on promotion from Petty to Warrant Officers will receive an allowance of £16, but no further allowance will be made.

2.    Servants, cooks, and stewards:—

Jacket: Blue cloth ; brass buttons, six in number ; crown and anchor.

Waistcoat: Blue cloth, five brass buttons.

Trousers: Blue cloth.

Cap: Blue cloth with peak, and two brass buttons for chin-strap.

They may be permitted to wear, also, a serge suit, with tunic and brass buttons.

SECTION X.—MEDICAL BRANCH.

1. The Medical Officer, in addition to his duties as laid down in the Regulations for the Naval Brigade, shall attend upon the Permanent Force, in accordance with his special agreement.

Medical Survey.

2. In the event of any member becoming physically unfit for duty, the Naval Commandant may direct the Senior Medical Officer to report on such member, aud if found unfit may discharge him from the service on giving one month’s notice.

SECTION XI.

1. Any member of the Victorian Permanent Naval Forces who violates or neglects to observe any command or injunction contained in the foregoing Rules and Regulations shall be guilty of a minor offence against discipline.

TABLE A. Seamen Class. Chie f Petty Officers.

Chief Gunner’s Mate.

Chief Boatswain’s Mate.

Chief Captain of the Forecastle.

First-class

Gunner’s Mate.

Boatswain’s Mate.

Captain of the Forecastle. Captain’s Coxswain. Quartermaster.

Yeoman of Signals.

Coxswain of the Launch.

Secotid-class

Coxswain of the Pinnace. Second Captain of the Forecastle.

Second Captain of the Maintop. Second Captain of the Foretop. Signalman.


Chief Quartermaster. Chief Yeoman of Signals.


Petty Officers.

Captain of the Maintop. Captain of the Foretop. Captain of the Quarterdeck Men.

Captain of the Hold.

Sailmaker.

Ropemaker.

Petty Officers.

Second Captain of the Quarterdeck Men.

Captain of the Mizentop. Sailmaker’s Mate.

Coxswain of the Cutter.


Remainder

Leading Seaman.

Yeoman of Store Room. Second Captain of the Hold. Sailmaker’s Crew.

Able Seaman.


rf Ship's Company.

Signalman, 2nd Cl-ass. Training Seaman. Signalman, 3rd Class. Boy.

Naval Apprentice.


TABLE B.

Officers.

Rank.

Pay from 1st July, 1888.

Minimum.

Maximum.

Increment.

£

s.

d.

£

s.

d.

£

s.

d.

Naval Commandant

SOO

0

0

800

0

0

800

0

0

Nil.

Commander ...

440

0

0

400

0

0

600

0

0

£15 per ann.

Lieutenant ...

400

0

0

400

0

0

400

0

0

Nil.

Lieutenant ...

350

0

0

350

0

0

350

0

0

Nil.

Sub-Lieutenant ...

200

0

0

200

0

0

300

0

0

£10 per ann.

Chief Engineer ...

380

10

0

330

0

0

450

0

0

£10 10s. per

annum.

Engineer......

297

10

0

200

0

0

300

0

0

£7 10s. ,,

Engineer ... ...

252

10

0

200

0

0

300

0

0

£7 10s. „

Engineer ... ...

234

10

0

200

0

0

300

0

0

£7 10s. „

Engineer ... ...

227

10

0

200

0

0

300

0

0

£7 10s. „

Engineer ... ...

214

10

0

200

0

0

300

0

0

£7 10s. „

Staff Surgeon ...

200

0

0

200

0

0

200

0

0

Nil.

Assistant Paymaster

240

0

0

220

0

0

350

0

0

£10 per ann.

Clerk ......

90

0

0

80

0

0

200

0

0

£10 ,,

Chief Gunner ...

240

0

0

225

0

0

240

0

0

£5 ,,

Chief Boatswain ...

240

0

0

225

0

0

240

0

0

£5 „

Gunner, 1st Class

225

0

0

200

0

0

225

0

0

£5 „

Gunner, 1st Class

225

0

0

200

0

0

225

0

0

£5 „

Torpedo Instructor

210

0

0

200

0

0

225

0

0

£5 „

Gunner, 2nd Class

192

10

0

182

10

0

200

0

0

£5 „

Gunner, 2nd Class

192

10

0

182

10

0

200

0

0

£5 ,,

Gunner, 2nd Class

160

2

6

155

2

6

200

0

0

£5 ,,

Gunner, 2nd Class

160

2

6

155

2

6

200

0

0

£5 ,,

Carpenter, 2nd Class

160

2

6

155

2

6

200

0

0

£5 „

6,332

7

6

5,860

7

6

7,305

0

0

Petty Officers, Seamen, and Others.

No.

Rating.

Pay

per

diem.

Increment per diem.

Daily Pay.

Yearly Pay.

Mini

mum.

Maxi

mum.

Minimum.

Maximum.

s.

d.

s.

d.

.<?.

d.

£ .s.

d.

d. ;

2

Engineroom Artificers

9

0

Is. after 5 yrs.

9

0

10

0

328 10

0

365 0

0

4

Chief Leading Stokers

6

6

6d. after 5 yrs.

6

6

7

0

474 10

0

511 0

0

6

Leading Stokers ..

6

0

6d. after 5 yrs

6

0

6

6

657 0

0

711 15

0

1

Torpedo Artificer ..

5

6

6d. per diem

5

6

7

6

100 7

6

136 17

6

per annum.

2

Stokers .. ..

5

6

Nil .. ..

5

6

5

6

200 15

0

200 15

0

22

Stokers .. ..

5

0

Nil .. ..

5

0

5

0

2,007 10

0

2,007 10

0

2

Training Stokers ..

3

6

Nil .. ..

3

6

3

6

127 15

0

127 15

0

3

Chief Petty Officers

7

0

6d. after 5 yrs.

6

6

7

0

355 17

6

83 5

0

5

1st Class Petty Officers

6

6

6d. after 5 yrs.

6

0

6 6 )

____ _ _

6

1st Class Petty Officers

6

0

6d. after 5 yrs.

6

0

6 6

10

Leading Seamen ..

5

6

Nil . ..

5

6

5

6

1,003 15

0

1,003 15

0

67

Able Seamen ..

5

0

Nil .. ..

5

0

5

0

6,113 15

0

6,113 15

0

7

Training Seamen ..

3

6

Nil .. ..

3

6

3

6

447 2

6

447 2

6

1

Bugler .. ..

4

0

Nil .. ..

4

0

4

0

73 0

0

73 0

0

5

Boys .. .. ..

2

0

Nil .. ..

2

0

2

0

182 10

0

182 10

0

1

Ship’s Corporal ..

7

0

6d. after 5 yrs.

6

6

7

0

118 12

6

127 15

0

1

Ship’s Corporal ..

6

0

6d. after 5 yrs.

6

0

6

6

109 10

0

118 12

6

1

Armourer .. ..

8

6

6d. after each

8

0

9

0

146 0

0

164 5

0

5 years.

1

Painter .. ..

6

6

6d. after 5 yrs.

6

6

7

0

118 12

6

127 15

0

2

Carpenter’s Mates ..

7

0

6d. after 5 yrs.

6

6

7

0

237 5

0

255 10

0

1

Carpenter .. ..

5

6

Nil .. ..

5

6

5

6

100 7

6

100 7

6

2

Carpenters .. ..

5

0

Nil .. ..

5

0

5

0

182 10

0

182 10

0

1

Officers’ Cook ..

6

6

6d. after 5 yrs.

6

0

6

6

109 10

0

118 12

6

1

Ship’s Cook .. ..

5

6

Nil .. ..

5

6

5

6

100 7

6

100 7

6

4

Cooks .. .. ..

5

0

Nil .. ..

5

0

5

0

365 0

0

365 0

0

1

Chief Ship’s Steward

8

6

Gd. per diem

7

0

8

6

127 15

0

155 2

6

per annum.

1

Sick Berth Attendant

6

6

Gd. per diem

6

6

8

6

118 12

6

155 2

6

per annum

1

Captain’s Steward ..

5

6

Nil .. ..

5

6

5

6

100 7

6

100 7

6

1

Officers’ Steward ..

5

6

Nil .. ..

5

6

5

6

100 7

6

100 7

6

4

Officers’ Stewards ..

5

0

Nil .. ..

5

0

5

0

365 0

0

365 0

0

15

Naval Apprentices .

1

0

Nil .. ..

1

0

1

0

273 15

0

273 15

0

15,950 10

0

16,379 7

6

Tool money to five Carpenters, at 3d. per diem, £22 16s. 3d.

Instruction money to Chief Gunner Smith, Is. 6d. per diem, £27 7s. 6d.

Special Allowance of 6d. per diem to 12 men who qualify as Torpedo Instructors, £10910s., and 4d. per diem to 36 men who qualify as 1st Class Seamen Gunners and Torpedo men, £219 : Total, £328 10.

TABLE C.

Travelling Allowances—Naval and Military Forces.

The following scale of travelling allowances, to be drawn by officers and others of the Naval and Military Forces regularly employed under the Discipline Act or in the Defence Department, has been approved by His Excellency the Governor in Council.

Scale.

Per Day.

Per Week.

S.

d.

£

s.

d.

The Naval or Military Commandant ...

20

0

...

Other Commissioned Officers ...

15

0

...

Warrant Officers—Naval ... ...

10

0

2

10

0

,, Military ...

8

0

2

0

0

Petty and Non-commissioned Officers ...

7

0

1

15

0

Seamen, Gunners, and Privates ...

5

0

1

5

0

Heads of Branches ... ...

15

0

...

Employés, £225 per annum or over ...

10

0

2

10

0

„ £180 and under £225 per

annum ... ...

7

6

2

0

0

Other Employes ... ... ...

5

0

1

o

0

Permanent Employés of Torpedo Corps

when absent on special duty in Miner

2

0

...

For a whole day, not including the nig

lit, two-thirds

of the


allowance only to be charged.

2.    For a whole day, including the night, the full scale may be charged.

3.    For a half day, not including the night, one-third of the allowance only to be charged.

4.    Cab and coach fare, horse and conveyance hire, to be charged for extra, but in every case where practicable receipted vouchers for the same must accompany the accounts sent in for travelling expenses. No officer shall proceed travelling on any duty without first informing his senior officer, and such senior officer, before granting permission, shall satisfy himself that the travelling is necessary.

5.    If, through the exigency of the service, the permission of the senior officer could not be obtained, such should be at once reported in writing, or verbally, if the officer travelling return within 24 hours.

6.    When the distance travelled does not exceed ten miles, only the necessary expenses actually incurred are to be charged.

7.    Superior officers will be allowed the use of a private room when travelling on duty, if absolutely necessary.

8.    Field allowance may be granted to the officer commanding the Forces at such rate and on such occasions as meet the approval of the Ministerial head of his department.

9.    When officers and others are absent for any period exceeding seven days, the allowance shall be reduced by such an amount as the Minister may deem requisite.

10.    Before certifying to accounts for travelling expenses, officers should assure themselves that the travelling was necessary, that the time occupied was not excessive, and that the charges as a whole are fair and reasonable.

TABLE D. Chief Petty Officers.


Master-at Arms.

Chief Gunner's Mate.

Chief Boatswain’s Mate.

Chief Captain of the Forecastle.

Chief Quartermaster.

Chief Yeoman of Signals. Chief Enyine-room Artificer.

First-class

¡Ship’s Corporal, 1st Class. Ship's Corporal, 2nd Class. Gunner’s Mate. ’

Boatswain’s Mate.

Captain of the Forecastle. Captain’s Coxswain. Quartermaster.

Yeoman of Signals.

Coxswain of the Launch. Captain of the Maintop. Captain of the Foretop. Captain of the Quarterdeck Men.


Chief Torpedo Artificer. Chief Carpenter s Mate (skilled).

Engine-room Artificer. Chief Leading Stoker. Ship's Steward.

Sick Berth Steward. Ship's Cook.

Petty Officers.

Captain of the Hold. Sailmaker.

Ropemaker.

Carpenter s Mate. Caulker.

Blacksmith.

Torpedo Artificer. Armourer.

Plumber.

Painter, 1st Class. Leading Stoker. Bandmaster.


Second-class

Coxswain of the Pinnace. Second Captain of the Forecastle.

Second Captain of the Maintop. Second Captain of the Foretop. Signalman.

Second Captain of the Quarterdeck Men.

Remainder of Leading Seaman.

Shipwright.

Yeoman of Store-room.

Second Captain of the Hold. Sailmaker’s Crew.

Able Seaman.

Signalman, 2nd Class.

Stoker.

Blacksmith's Crew.

7 insmith.

Armourer s Crete.


Petty Officers.

Captain of the Mizentop. Sailmaker’s Mate.

Coxswain of the Cutter.

Cooper.

Caulker s Mate.

Painter, 2nd Class.

Plumber's Mate.

Musician.

Ship's Company.

Cat penter's Crete.

Plumber s Crew.

Cooper's Crete.

Writer.

Training Seaman.

Signalman, 3rd Class.

Training Stoker.

Cooks, Stewards, and Servants. Bandsman.

Boy.

Naval Apprentice.


TABLE E.

I.—Officers of the rank of Lieutenants, Sub-Lieutenants, Warrant Officers, and Midshipmen will be required to pass through the following course of gunnery within six months of the issuing of the order:—

List of Gunnert Instruction.

1.

Turret ... ... ...

... 5 days.

2.

Albert, for 6-inch and 8-incli guns

... 5

3.

Victoria, for 10-inch and 12-pr.

... 5 „

4.

Machine gun ... ...

... 3 „

5.

Rifle and Field exercise ...

... 10 „

6.

Cutlass and pistol ... ...

... 3 „

n

i .

Ammunition ... ...

... 7 „

38 days.

d

Candidates will be examined at the end of each instruction, and any candidate who fails to obtain “ Good ” will not be considered to have qualified.

Opportunities will be given to candidates who failed to obtain “ Good” in any instruction to re-qualify in that subject.

The following is an outline of examination for the guidance of candidates:—

1.    To be able to perform the duties of captain of a turret, or

of any No. (from 1 to 7) at a turret or (from 1 to 6) at a B.L. gun; and to have a good general knowledge of the fittings and working of turrets.

2.    To have a thorough knowledge of the different firings, and

of the ammunition and fuzes, of the different description of guns in the Victorian Navy; tq be able to describe the different systems of compression, recoil presses, &c.

3.    To understand the mechanism and working of the Norden-

felt and Gatling guns, and to take any No.

4.    A thorough knowledge of manual and firing exercise,

without detail.

5.    Squad and company drill—a good knowledge of the

principal battalion manoeuvres.

6.    To be able to perform the cutlass and pistol exercise.

7.    To be able to drill a gun's crew, turret battery, squad, or

company in any of the above subjects, and to correct errors.

When drilling quarters or squad of men, officers are to be particularly careful to give their orders in clear tone and smait manner. No officer who is an indifferent drill will be awarded a first-class certificate in gunnery.

Whitehead Torpedoes.

II. To understand its construction, with the exception of the secret portion of either description of torpedo: to make all adjustments ; to charge and run the torpedo either from dropping gear, air gun, or steam impulse ; and to be able to take charge of any Whitehead torpedo boat. Also, to have a good knowledge of the spar torpedo, and to be able to take charge of a spar torpedo boat.

Preliminary instruction    ...    8 days.

Boat work ...    • ••    •••    8    „

Officers obtaining 1st class numbers in all gunnery subjects to have G in brackets (G) after their names in the Victorian Navy List; if in torpedo, (T); if in both, (G X T).

Full numbers to be fixed for each subject, and 1st and 2nd class, as, for example—

also numbers for

Full numbers... •’* ..

100

1st class ... ... ...

85 VG

2nd class ... ... ...

70 G


Midshipmen, if qualified in navigation and seamanship, may be promoted to Sub-Lieutenant as vacancies occur; but will be required to ie-qualify before promotion to Lieutenant.

Sub-Lieutenants qualifying will be eligible for promotion as vacancies occur.

No officer of any rank will be considered eligible for promotion •until he lias qualified as above.

Officers may wear flannels, white or blue, while passing through.

TABLE F.

Qualifications of Seamen, Gunners, and Torpedo Men.

All candidates must be able to read and write, and furthermore they must possess the following qualifications. They will be required:—

1.    Heavy and Light Guns

(a.) To have a good knowledge of the principal parts of the guns, carriages, slides, and compressors, and to be able to instruct in such.

(5.) To know the general instructions for B.L.R. guns, as contained in the Drill Manual for the Victorian Naval Forces.

(c.) 1 o be able to give practical instruction in preliminary drill, aud the firings in practice for M.L. and B.L. guns, and to be able to perform the duties of any No. efficiently.

2.    Field Exercise

(a.) To know, and be able to teach, the names of the different parts of the rifle.

(b.) To be able to give practical instruction in rifle exercise by numbers, or in quick time, without minute detail, and to be able to perform the same in a highly efficient manner.

D 2

(c.) To be able to perform their duties in the ranks of a squad in an efficient manner, and to impart practical instruction in squad drill and squad skirmishing.

(d.) To be able to perform their duties in the ranks of a company in an efficient manner, and to do the duties of a “marker.”

3. Fuzes and Ammunition

(a.) To know by sight, and to be able to readily fit, any fuze in use with the guns of the Victorian Navy, aud to be able to give a general description of their action.

(b.) To fit and prepare any projectile for given ranges.

(c.) To know how to distinguish and fire signal rockets and signal lights, and portfires, primers, and tubes.

(d.) To have a knowledge of all explosives as contained in the Manual for the Victorian Naval Forces, and the instruction for filling shell, and tables of projectiles and charges in use.

(e.) To understand the arrangements of magazines and shell rooms, the supply of ammunition, flooding valves, &c. (/.) To know what stores are supplied in manning and arming boats.

4. Cutlass and Pistol Drill

(a.) To be able to put a party of men through the drill without detail, but to correct the errors, and to be able to efficiently perform the drill themselves.

(6.) To prove themselves fair shots with a pistol.

5. Turret Drill


(a.) To understand the general working of the turret, and to be able to perform the duties of any No. in turret drill. (b.) To understand the sighting of turret guns.

6.    Field and Machine Gun Drill

(a.) To understand the mechanism and working, and to take any No., and perform the duties efficiently.

7.    Candidates will require to obtain the following points to qualify as 1st, 2nd, or 3rd class shots:—

Class for firing. 1st class. 2nd class. 3rd class.


Firings.


Averages.

8 points and over

68

8. No man shall be rated as Seaman Gunner until he reaches the standard of a 2nd class shot.

9. Points are awarded as follows:—

25 yards short to 50 yards over ...    4 points.

50    „    100    „    ...    3    „

75    „    150    „    ...    2    „

120    „    200    „    ...    1    „

10.


Final Classification.


Numbers lost in each instruction:—

0 to 5    ... Y.G.I. qualification.


6 to 10 11 to 15

16 to 25


Over 25


Y.G.

Good

Fair


55

55

55


Indifferent


11. To qualify as Seaman Gunner, not more than 60 numbers must be lost in all subjects. Either “fair” or “indifferent” in any of the subjects will disqualify.

Y.G.I.—Smart drills, likely to make Instructors.

Y.G.—Smart drills, in lesser degree.

Good—Not recommended for Gunnery Instructor.

Fair or Indifferent—Not recommended at all.

Details of Examination for Torpedo Men.

Candidates will be required to have a knowledge of the following:—

1.—Whitehead Torpedo—

General description of, and difference between, the 19-foot


Fiume and the 14-inch 1

2. —19-foot Fiume—

Speed.

Capacity of Air Chamber. Adjustments.

Method of Parting.

Lead of Air to Engines.

3. —14-inch Royal Laboratory-

Speed.

Capacity of Air Chamber. Adjustments.

Method of Parting.

Lead of Air to Engines.


)yal Laboratory Torpedoes. Pistol.

Right and Left Wires.

Wedge Rod.

Reducing Yalve.

Locking Gear.

Pistol.

Method of Starting and Stopping. Reducing Yalves.


4. —Torpedo-boat Childers

Lead of Air from Pump to Reservoirs.

Charging Reservoirs and Torpedoes.

Gauges and their uses.

Discharging the Torpedo from the Air-gun.

Dropping the Torpedo from the Dropping-gear.

Picking up the Torpedo.

5. —2nd Class Torpedo Boats—

Working the impulse and stops for the Fiume and the Royal Laboratory Torpedo.

6. —Spar Torpedoes—

Theory and Construction of Le Clanche’s and Daniell’s Batteries.

Test and Renovation of Batteries.

Use of Menotti Test.

Lead of Circuits (Broadside and Right-a-head Fire). Joining-up and Precautions.

Firing Key and Contact Makers.

Gun-cotton and Detonators.

Practical Working of Spars on both systems.

Management of all classes of Boats.

Instructors will be expected to take charge of any Torpedo boat as Officer of the boat.

And the Honorable James Lorimer, Her Majesty’s Minister of Defence for Victoria, shall give the necessary directions herein accordingly.

ROB. WADSWORTH,

Clerk of the Executive Council.

VICTORIAN NAVAL BRIGADE.

REGULATIONS UNDER “THE DISCIPLINE ACT 1870.”

At the Executive Council Chamber, Melbourne, the twenty-first day of September, 1885.

Present:

His Excellency tlie Governor;

Mr. Service Mr. Berry Mr. Kerferd Mr. Gillies Mr. Langridge


Mr. Tucker Mr. Levien Mr. Sargood Mr. Campbell.


Whereas by “ The Discipline Act 1870 ” it is provided Preamble that the Governor in Council may make liules and Regulations for the employment, removal, or dismissal, and for the better government of persons engaged by virtue of the said Act, and for enforcing good order and discipline among them, and otherwise for carrying out the said Act, and from time to time annul, alter, or amend the same, and substitute others in lieu thereof: And whereas the Governor in Council has from time to time, in pursuance of the said provision, made certain Rules and Regulations for the said purposes: And whereas it is expedient to amend the same, and to make further Regulations :

Now therefore His Excellency the Governor of Victoria, with the advice of the Executive Council thereof, doth by this present Order direct that the following Rules and Regulations shall be and the same are hereby made:—

Amendment of Existing Rules and Regulations.

The Regulations heretofore made under the provisions of “ The Discipline Act 1870 ” shall, after the making of this Order, not apply to the Victorian Naval Brigade.

The following Rules and Regulations shall apply to the Victorian

Naval Brigade.

SECTION I.—DEFINITIONS.

1.    The term “ Commandant ” as used in the following Regulations shall mean the Naval Commandant.

2.    The term “ Commanding Officer” as used in the following Regulations shall mean the Senior Commanding Officer of the Naval Brigade for the time being, or any Officer commanding a detachment. The Commandant shall determine when any portion of the Brigade is a detachment within the meaning of these Regulations.

3.    The term “ General Orders ” as used in the following Regulations shall mean any orders issued under the authority of the Commandant.

4.    The term “ Brigade ” as used in the following Regulations shall mean the Victorian Naval Brigade.

5.    The term “ effective” shall mean any member who has attended afloat and ashore three-fourths of the time laid down in these Regulations for drill and instruction.

SECTION II.-CONSTITUTION.

1.    The Brigade shall comprise such Commissioned and Warrant and Petty Officers and men and boys as may from time to time be duly engaged, sworn in, and appointed under the provisions of “ The Discipline Act 1870 ” and the Acts amending the said Act. All future applicants for engagement in the Brigade, excepting Officers and Stokers, must produce a satisfactory discharge showing that they have served as seamen either in the Royal Navy or the Mercantile Marine. In the case of Stokers, they will have to show that they have served in that capacity.

2.    The Brigade shall also consist of two Divisions, and each Division shall be divided into two Subdivisions. Each Subdivision shall be under the charge of a Lieutenant.

3.    One Division shall be stationed at Sandridge, and the other at Williamstown. The Head-quarters of the Brigade shall be as ordered by the Commandant.

4.    Engagement shall be for a period of one year. Any person so engaged may, with the approval of the Governor in Council if an Officer, or of the Commandant if below the rank of an Officer, resign and obtain his discharge from the Brigade when not called out for actual service, on payment of the sum of £2. Such sum shall be taken to be as and for liquidated damages due by such person to Her Majesty, and shall become due immediately on the acceptance of the resignation of such person being signified to him by the Commandant, and may be recovered in the name of Her Majesty: Provided, however, that the Commandant may remit the whole or any portion of such penalties on the recommendation of the Commanding Officer.

5.    No person shall be engaged unless he be a British subject and between the ages of 19 and 35, but persons who have previously served in the Imperial Regular or Auxiliary Naval Forces, or in any Colonial Naval Force, may be enrolled, if under the age of 40.

6.    All applicants for engagement shall be subject to a medical examination, and must produce certificates of good character, or mustotherwise satisfy the Commanding Officer that their character and conduct have been good.

7.    The standard height will be oft. Gin. and upwards, with proportionate chest measurement. Exceptions to the standard of height may be allowed with the approval of the Commandant.

8.    Boys may be engaged; but not more than two boys per Division will be allowed. Age 14 to 17 years.

8. All applicants for engagement must attend at least twice a week in the drill-rooms, and at musters afloat, until passed at the preliminary Gun and Cutlass Drills by the Officer duly appointed for the purpose.

10.    Every person so engaged shall take and subscribe before some justice, or before any Commissioned Officer in command of any vessel of war or corps, the oath in the First Schedule of “ The Discipline Act 1870.”

11.    All Commissioned, Warrant, or Petty Officers, or seamen, engaged under the provisions of the said Act, shall be entitled, subject to these Regulations, to receive an annual retainer or

allowance, according to the following scale, on condition of their performing the necessary number of drills, afloat and ashore, as

hereinafter mentioned:—

Captain ... ... ...

... £100

Commander ... ...

... 60

Lieutenants ... ...

... 50

Sub-Lieutenants... ...

... 25

Surgeon ... .. ...

... 36

Midshipmen ... ...

... 18

Warrant Officers... ...

... 25

1st Class Petty Officers...

... 16

2nd Class Petty Officers

... 14

Able Seamen ... ...

... 12

The following will be the pay of

the Instructors permanently

attached to the Naval Brigade:—

No.

Rank.

Pay from 1st July, 1886.

Minimum

Pay.

Maximum Increment Pay. per Annum.

i

Gunner, 1st Class ...

£ s. d, 210 0 0

£ s. d. 182 10 0

£ s. d. £ s. d. 225 0 0 5 0 0

i

Gunner, 2nd Class ...

187 10 0

155 2 6

200 0 0 5 0 0

397 10 0

337 12 6

425 0 0

The foregoing rates of retainer and pay will take effect from the 1st of July, 1886.

12.    The annual retainer or allowance will be paid in quarterly instalments. The quarters are to be considered as commencing on the 1st January, 1st April, 1st July, and 1st October in each year. A proportionate number of drills to be performed during each quarter of the year, and any member failing to attend the prescribed number of drills will not be entitled to such quarter’s retainer. Recruits, until passed, will be required to attend two drills per week at least, as well as the afloat drills; and, should they not make such progress at drill as to satisfy the Commanding Officer, they will render themselves liable to be dismissed upon his recommendation.

13.    Every member of the Brigade will be required to drill 25 davs in each year, to be made up of one hundred and fifty hours, exclusive of reviews.

13a. There will be two reviews a year, and all members of the Brigade must attend one of such reviews.

Every member failing to comply with this Regulation shall be liable to be fined 20s.

Note.—Notwithstanding the above Regulation, all members must attend any inspection that may be made by the Officer Commanding the Imperial Naval Forces, providing their inspection is not called for more than once a year. The penalty for non-attendauce at such inspection shall be 20s.

14. The following drills must be performed in order to entitle members to the retainer or allowance:—

124 hours 25' „

- 37^ hours


16 hours

hours


First Quarter— 3 half days afloat Drills ashore ...

Second Quarter—2 whole days afloat Drills ashore ...

In addition, two extra days afloat to complete the Easter Cruise will be paid for at the rate of 10s. per diem for A.B/s; other ranks in proportion.

Third Quarter— 3 half days afloat    ... 12^ hours

Drills ashore...    ... 25    „

--37^ hours


Fourth Quarter—3 half days afloat    ... 12^ hours

Drills ashore...    ... 25    „

---37tt hours

Should Easter fall in the first quarter of the year, the drills detailed above for the second quarter will be performed in the first quarter, and vice versa. Every member of the brigade must be present during the Easter Cruise, excepting those who are prevented by reason of sickness, in which case a medical certificate must be produced, or who can give a satisfactory reason for their absence to the Commanding Officer.

The yearly Musketry instruction at the Butts will also take place, during the first or second quarter in each year, according to the date upon which Easter Monday may fall.

Arrangements may be made to enable absentees to make up sufficient drills to entitle them to the retainer for the quarter.

15.    The musters and drills of the annual courses of Musketry and Gunnery may be included in the above drills.

Members who have passed the yearly Musketry instruction will be allowed facilities to pass, as trained men, in the use of breech and muzzle loading rifle guns, broadside gun drill, and Nordenfelt guns, as well as rifle, cutlass, and single-stick exercises. After so passing, they will only be called upon to <lrill once a week, or thirteen times for 1^ hours during each quarter ashore, besides the usual drills afloat ; and all such members will be called upon at the beginning of each year to pass as trained men.

16.    Pay will be issued to Commanding Officers and Staff on the certificate of the Commandant that they have performed the necessary duties during the period for which it is claimed.

17.    If temporarily resident in another district, or should the exigencies of the service admit, a Brigade man may by order of the Commandant be attached to a Division serving in such district, and drills done with such Division shall be returned to the Commanding Officer and count towards retainer or allowance.

18.    Officers detached on special duty shall be paid retainer or allowance on having performed the duties required of them by General Order.

19.    Attendance at church musters or funerals shall not be allowed to count for retainer, nor shall pay be granted for such attendance.

20.    Extra drills, afloat and ashore, will be called, in order to allow members the opportunity of earning the maximum amount of retainer or allowance.

Arrangements will be made to transport members of the Brigade to and from the drill ship free of expense. The time of drills afloat will count from the time they first embark.

21.    When the Commandant, or Officer deputed by him, makes the annual official inspection of the Brigade or a detachment thereof, every Officer, Warrant Officer, Petty Officer, and seaman should be present unless prevented by sickness or urgent necessity. In the former case, a certificate from the Officer in medical charge to be produced; in the latter, leave may be granted by the Officer Commanding, but only in urgent cases. Any member not attending such inspection is liable to a fine of £1.

22.    In the event of any member becoming physically unfit for duty, the Commandant may cause a Medical Board to assemble, to report upon such member, and upon tlieir recommendation may deal with bis case.

23.    The time during which a member of the Naval Brigade is absent from drill on account of sickness or accident shall not count as part of the drill. On his being removed from the sick list, he must perform the proper term of drill required by these Regulations.

24.    In the event of the death of a member of the Brigade, the balance of any pay which may be due to him will be paid to his legal representative.

25.    Any Officer who does not attend more than three-fourths of the annual drills shall not be allowed to retain his commission or warrant unless it be represented by the Commandant that there are special reasons for a relaxation of this Regulation.

26.    Any Petty Officer who does not attend more than three-fourths of the annual drills shall be reduced to the position of an A.B. unless it shall appear to the Commandant that there are special reasons for the relaxation of this Regulation.

27.    When any person is engaged in the Brigade, a certificate of his engagement will be delivered to him by his Commanding Officer. This certificate must be taken care of, as it will constitute the proof of his title to the pay and other advantages of the service. It must be produced every time he appears at drill, in order that the requisite entries may be made.

28.    All entries on certificates must be made or countersigned by an Officer of the Brigade.

29.    If any member accidentally lose his certificate, he should make application to his Commanding Officer to have it renewed.

30.    Subject to these Regulations, no restriction is laid on the occupation of a member whilst belonging to the Brigade, provided that he complies with the conditions mentioned below, and especially with that condition which requires him to appear before some Officer once every three months, unless he obtains leave of absence for a longer period.

31.    Every member shall give immediate notice to his Commanding Officer of any change of residence, or of the place to which letters and notices are to be addressed to him.

32.    In event of the Brigade being called out by proclamation, every member is bound to serve in any vessel belonging to or •employed by the Government of Victoria, or on shore, under penalty of being treated as a deserter.

33.    When a member of the Brigade, after being called out by proclamation, is released from actual service, the requisite entries ■of service shall be recorded in his certificate.

34.    The Commandant may discharge any members, other than Officers, on attaining the age of 45 years.

35.    Any member who is discovered to have been, at the time of engagement, suffering from disease, or to have sustained injury which incapacitates him, and who has concealed such disease or injury, or who is discovered to have made any false representation or to have produced any false papers on the occasion of engagement, shall at once be struck off the list, and will forfeit all claim to pay or other advantages of the service.

SECTION III.—DISCIPLINE.

1.    As it desirable to keep up in all ranks a proper feeling and high sense of honour, by which the correct and willing discharge of duty will best be insured, Officers of every rank should be impressed with the advantage which they individually, the Brigade, and the service at large will derive from the adoption towards those under them of a system of command and treatment which shall insure respect towards superiors.

2.    Officers are to adopt such a system themselves, and are to require it to be adopted by the Petty Officers; and the example of Officers will have the effect of checking the use of improper and offensive terms on the part of the Petty Officers towards the men. If acts of intentional neglect or of insubordination should take place, and the means of correction and punishment authorized by the Regulations of the service have to be resorted to, these measures will have double effect if not preceded by intemperate language.

3.    Officers are to avoid reproving; Petty Officers for any irregularity, neglect of duty, or awkwardness, in the presence or hearing of the men—unless it shall he necessary for the benefit of example that the reproof be public—lest their authority should be weakened or their self-respect lessened.

4.    Officers are at all times accountable for the maintenance of good order and the rules and discipline of the service, and they are to afford in these respects the utmost aid and support to the Commanding Officer. It is their duty to take notice of, repress, and instantly report any negligence or impropriety of conduct in Petty Officers and men, whether on duty or off duty.

o. Deliberations or discussions, having the object of conveying praise, censure, or any mark of approbation towards superiors or any others in Her Majesty’s service, are strictly prohibited, as being subversive of discipline, and an assumption of power which belongs to the Sovereign alone, or to those Officers to whom the command and discipline of the Force may be intrusted. Every Officer will therefore be held responsible who shall allow himself to be complimented by Officers, Petty Officers, or men who are serving, or who have served under his command, by means of presents of plate, swords, &c., or by any collective expression of their opinion.

6.    The Brigade will not assemble for any purpose unconnected with naval muster, drill, or rifle practice except with the approval of the Commandant.

7.    Members are not individually or collectively to attend political meetings or join in public political discussions or demonstrations in uniform. The Band is not to appear in uniform except at muster or drill without the consent of the Commanding Officer.

8.    Officers are to use their utmost vigilance to prevent members publishing information relative to the numbers, movements, or operations of the Force, or any naval details; and any member will be held personally responsible for reports of this kind which he may make without special permission, or for placing the information beyond his control, so that it finds its way into unauthorized hands. Furthermore, members are forbidden to give publicity to their individual opinions in any manner tending to prejudge <1068(1003 that may at the time be undergoing official investigation by the Naval authorities. Anonymous complaints, and the publication through the medium of the press of anything calculated to act injuriously on the interests of the service or to excite discontent in the Force, are also strictly prohibited.

9.    Commanding Officers shall be responsible for the discipline, drill, and instruction of those under their command, and they shall notice any infraction of the provisions of the law, or of the orders of the Commandant, relating to the use of arms, the Regulations about clolhing, distinctive marks of rank, discipline, and the like.

10.    When members of the Force belonging to one or more Divisions are brought together under arms, at rifle matches or on other occasions, either in or out of uniform, the Senior Officer present is to be considered as in command; and although his position in this respect does not involve any authority for his interference in the arrangements of the meeting, yet he is held responsible for the due maintenance of order and discipline among the members of the Force present.

11.    Disobedience of orders or disrespect shown to higher authority shall be instantly reported to the Commanding Officer, and it is impressed upon all ranks that discipline depends entirely upon instant obedience; so that not only must all Officers see that it is always duly enforced, but Petty Officers failing to report any contempt or neglect of their authority will be liable to be summarily reduced. Obedience must be rendered even when it may be considered justifiable subsequently to prefer a complaint.

12.    Anv member may, for anv offence against good order and discipline, be placed under arrest by his Superior Officer.

13.    Arrest shall signify a suspension from all naval duty and participation in rifle shooting ; and any member placed under arrest shall deliver up his arms and accoutrements to such person as his Commanding Officer may direct.

14.    If any member, while under arms or on duty with the Force to which he belongs or any portion of the Force, or while engaged in any naval exercise or drill—either in uniform or plain clothes, or while going to or returning from any place of exercise or assembly—disobey any lawful order of the Officer under whose command he then is or is guilty of misconduct, any Superior

Officer may order the offender, if an Officer into arrest, and if not an Officer into the custody of any Petty Officer or seaman ; but so that the offender be not kept in such custody longer than during the time such portion of the Force as aforesaid remains under arms or on duty. After which, his case will either be disposed of by the Officer Commanding on the spot, or he will be suspended from duty under clause 13, and reported to higher authority.

15. Duty with any portion of the Force is held to mean not only presence underarms at drill, but the performance of all duties of a naval nature in or out of uniform.

1G. Officers Commanding shall, immediately after drill, receive the reports of Officers as to any members of the Force who have misconducted themselves, and shall either deal summarily with the case or report it to a higher authority. In case of a fine, record of offence and punishment shall be made in the Order Book. Petty Officers shall not be subject to any fine unless previously reduced.

17.    If any member have cause to think himself aggrieved, he may represent his case to his Commanding Officer ; any appeal against the decision of the Commanding Officer will be made through the proper channel to the Commandant, and any further appeal will be made through these Officers for transmission to higher authority.

18.    Any member who fails to produce, for inspection, when retpiired, any arms, accoutrements, or other property intrusted to his care may be proceeded against under the Act, and steps taken for his summary discharge, for disobedience of orders.

19.    Any member whose services are dispensed with shall deliver up in good order, fair wear and tear only excepted, all arms, ammunition, accoutrements, clothing, or appointments, or any public stores or property issued to him, and if he refuse or neglect to comply with this Regulation, he may be proceeded against under the Act.

20.    When a member has been dismissed for misconduct, a notification of the fact, with the cause of dismissal, will be inserted in Orders, in addition to the Government Gazette.

21.    Members must not, under any circumstances, alter or tamper with their rifles, or use other than the authorized ammunition;

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and any ride which, on inspection, may he fotind to have had its lock or any other part altered or tampered with, will be at once returned into store, and repaired at the expense of the member to whom such rifle was issued, and the amount of such expense will be deducted from the retainer of such member.

22.    Any loss, damage, or destruction of arms, accoutrements, uniform, or stores which may be traced to any member, unless caused by circumstances beyond his control, shall be made good by stoppage from his retainer; or, in default thereof, proceedings against him will be instituted under the Act.

23.    The Commandant may summarily reduce in rank any Petty Officer, or may fine and dismiss any Petty Officer, or others below the rank of Petty Officer, for misconduct, or may discharge any Petty Officer, or others below the rank of Petty Officer.

24.    The Commanding Officer shall have power to enforce fines, not exceeding the following amounts:—

(a.) For appearing at muster or drill improperly s. d. dressed, or with clothing, arms, or accoutrements dirty    ...    ...    ...    2    6

(6.)    Talking at muster or drills ...    ...    2    6

(c.) Inattention, and other minor irregularities 2    6

(d.) Neglecting to notify change of address

within fourteen days of such change ...    2    6

(e.)    Neglect of duty    ...    ...    ...    5    0

(/.) Leaving the muster or drill without permission ...    ...    ...    ...    76

(g.) Minor cases of insubordination    ...    ...    10    0

(h.) Being absent without leave    within the

meaning of the Regulations    ...    ...    10    0

(¿.) Drunkenness on duty, or in camp, or elsewhere in uniform    ...    ...    ...    20    0

(j.) Failing to become effective    ...    ...    20    0

(k.) Being absent from the annual review or

official inspection    ...    ...    ...    20    0

All fines shall be noted in returns, and shall be appropriated according to law.

25.    Every member of the Brigade shall attend at least two musters or drills in each month. Any member of the Brigade failing to attend the required number of musters or drills in any month, unless on leave, shall be at the end of each month deemed to have been absent without leave within the meaning of these Regulations.

26.    Any member absent without leave for a period of three months shall be dismissed, unless in the opinion of the Commandant there be extenuating circumstances.

27.    Any member contravening the Regulations under the Railway Act, with reference to the free conveyance of members of the Naval and Military Forces, thereby renders himself liable to dismissal.

28.    Fines which cannot be settled from arrears of pay should be recovered by the Commanding Officer in a Court of Fetty Sessions.

SECTION IV.—INTERIOR ECONONY.

Officers.

1.    A Commanding Officer is invested with authority which renders him responsible to his Sovereign and his country for the maintenance of discipline, order, and a proper system of economy in the Force under his command. He is to exact from Officers and men rhe most explicit obedience to Regulations, and he is not only to enforce by command, but to encourage by example, the energetic discharge of duty.

2.    He is to see that the Officers are practically instructed in their duties. He will, at his discretion, direct the Officers to take the command of the drill, and in his presence to exercise the Force. The instruction of his men also forms a most essential part of the supervision of the Commanding Officer.

3.    It is the duty of a Commanding Officer to bring specially to the notice of the Commandant, through the proper channel, without favour or partiality, any Officers who may be distinguished for attention to and proficiency in their duties, as well as those who, from incapacity or habitual inattention, are deficient in a knowledge of their duties, or show an indisposition to afford the Commanding Officer that support which he has a right to expect from them, or conduct themselves in a manner injurious to the efficiency and the credit of the Force.

4.    An Officer in 'temporary command is not to give out any Standing Orders, or to alter those issued by the Commanding Officer, without a reierence to him or to the Commandant.

5.    Commanding Officers are to cause every Order and Circular issued for general information and guidance to he made known throughout their Division or Subdivision; and they are to afford all Officers under their command every facility for becoming acquainted with current changes in Regulations and Orders. Ignorance of published Orders wrill never he admitted as an excuse for their non-observance. All Orders relating to the Force are to he read and explained immediately after such Orders are received, and those of an important nature are to be read on three successive musters or drills.

6.    Nothing more essentially tends to the maintenance of regularity and good order than that system or chain of responsibility which should extent from the highest to the lowest grade. With this view the Brigade is divided into Divisions.

7.    It is of importance that a Commanding Officer should, at all times, make himself thoroughly acquainted with the professional abilities of the whole of the Officers placed under his charge, so as to assist the Commandant in the appreciation of the naval acquirements of those under his command.

8.    Great attention is required from Commanding Officers to the cleanliness of the clothing, arms, and accoutrements. The dress and appearance, as well as the demeanour of members, should on all occasions and in all situations be such as to create a respect for the service. Members must be properly dressed when going to and returning from musters or drills.

9.    Junior Officers on joining are to provide themselves with a nominal roll of their Subdivision or Sections, and are as soon as possible to make themselves acquainted with the disposition, character, age, and service of each of their men.

10.    It is expected that every Officer who has been two years in the service will be capable of commanding and exercising a Division in every situation, either afloat or ashore, and will be perfectly acquainted with its interior arrangement, economy, and discipline. No Officer is to be dismissed from drill until he has gone through a course of musketry instruction; and a course of singlestick, fencing, and navy signalling instruction.

11.    All Officers should furnish themselves with the latest edition of the Queen’s Regulations and Admiralty instructions for the Navy, The Gunnery Manual, The Regulations Victorian Naval Brigade, The Torpedo Manual, Field Exercises, Rifle and Musketry Instruction, Manual on Manufacture of Rifled Guns, Manual on Gunpowder, Manual on Ammunition Instruction, and such other books as may be directed by the Commandant from time to time.

Warrant Officers.

12.    All members promoted to Chief Warrant or Warrant rank will receive warrants bearing the signature of the Commandant.

Petty Officers.

13.    All other candidates for the rank of Petty Officer must pass such examination as may be directed by General Order before being eligible for appointment by the Commanding Officer.

14.    Petty Officers may, with their Commanding Officer’s consent, resign their rank, and revert to the rank or position they may have previously held, but they are not allowed to do so in order to escape the consequences of misconduct without the special sanction of the Commandant. A certificate of the Commanding Officer, stating the cause of the resignation (together with the written authority of the Commandant, if the case has been referred to him as above), is to be forwarded to the Commandant to be appended to the man’s enrolment form.

15.    Every Petty Officer is required to provide himself with, and to have in his possession, a copy of the Regulations for the Field Exercise and of the Gunnery Manual.

16.    When additional Petty Officers are required, 2nd Class Petty Officers may be appointed to act as 1st Class Petty Officers, and men as 2nd Class Petty Officers, who, if they prove themselves efficient, are to be promoted as vacancies occur. Such appointments not to carry extra pay.

17.    Petty Officers, after having served as such for five years, may be retired on the recommendation of the Commanding Officer.

18.    All funds for the payment of retainers and other moneys shall be paid to and administered by Commanding Officers.

19.    At the commencement of each year, the Commanding Officer will be credited for each effective member the sum of 20s. per head, together with 30s. per head on the established strength; to be expended by the said Commanding Officer, on behalf of the Force, on the following items:—

Clothing, not including pea-jackets.

Store-rooms.

Expenses in connexion with musters and camps.

Expenses incidental to target practice and prizes, not exceeding 15 per cent, of the effective money.

Band.

Cost of all supplies received from the Ordnance Department on repayment, or any other expenditure authorized by the Council of Defence.

20.    In case of the disbandment of the Brigade, any balance of the funds in the hands of the Commanding Officer shall lapse into the Defence Vote, after payment of all expenses sanctioned under these Regulations.

21.    Commanding Officers shall be responsible to Government for the due custody and expenditure of the Government allowances, no portion of which shall pass from their control or be expended except by their direction. The Government allowances shall be kept in a special bank account, and all books and accounts connected with the expenditure thereof shall be produced when required at Inspections.

22.    On or before the 10th of July in each year a balance-sheet of the past year’s receipts and expenditure, signed by the Commanding Officer, and countersigned by two other Officers, must be forwarded to the Minister of Defence. No portion of the annual allowance shall be issued to any Corps until such balance-sheet shall have been received by the Minister.

23.    The Council of Defence shall from time to time appoint and authorize some person or persons to examine all books and accounts of any Commanding Officer, and report thereon.

24.    Commanding Officers shall furnish such guarantee as maybe decided by the Governor in Council.

25.    One shilling per head on the establishment of the Brigade shall be deducted from the effective allowance, and the amount thereof paid to the Treasurer of the Victorian Rifle Association for the support of the ranges, &c.

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Band.

26.    The Band of the Naval Brigade is not to exceed a total strength of twenty in addition to the boys allowed to be engaged. These men are to be effective for service, to be perfectly drilled, and liable to serve in tbe Force on any emergency. Attendance at Band practice to count as drills. The Commanding Officer is empowered to employ supernumeraries as Bandsmen in addition to the numbers authorized, provided that no portion of the cost falls upon the funds of the Brigade.

27.    The Band is to be dressed the same as the Brigade.

28.    The following books of instruction, published by authority, are to be strictly adhered to by the Brigade without additions or alterations either as regards the soundings or their application:— “The Naval Bugle Sounds,” “Instructions for the Fife,” and “ The Art of Beating the Drum.”

29.    In order to ensure uniformity, the instruments are to be of the same pitch as that adopted by the “ Ancient Philharmonic Society.”

Hire of Drill-Booms.

30.    Commanding Officers are permitted to let drill-rooms belonging to their Divisions (when not required for instruction) for purposes other than military.

All rents to be paid by the Officer in charge of the detachment which occupies the drill-room to the Officer Commanding the Brigade, who will apply the same for the benefit of the Brigade, subject to such rateable deductions for benefit of head-quarters as he may deem advisable.

The rate of hiring to be fixed by the Commanding Officer.

SECTION V.—LEAVE OF ABSENCE.

1- Leave of1 absence, not exceeding one month, may be granted by Commanding Officers. Beyond this period, application must be made to the Commandant through the proper channel.

1.    All commands shall belong to the Senior Combatant Officer present on duty, irrespective of the branch of the service to which he belongs.

2.    Officers of the Brigade shall rank with Officers of Her Majesty’s Regular Forces and with Officers of the Permanent Militia Forces of the colony according to the rank and dates of their commissions.

3.    The relative precedence of Officers holding commissions of the same rank and date shall be determined by date of previous commissions, and where there are none by the order in which they appear in the Government Gazette.

SECTION VII.—HONOURS AND SALUTES.

1.    Petty Officers and men in uniform shall salute His Excellency the Governor and all Officers.

2.    No member of the Force shall be buried with naval honours, except by the express desire of his friends, notified to the Commanding Officer.

SECTION VIII.—COMMISSIONS AND PROMOTIONS OF OFFICERS.

1. The Council of Defence shall, on the nomination of the Commandant, recommend to the Governor in Council candidates who may be considered suitable for appointment as officers in the Naval Brigade. All such candidates will be appointed on probation for six months, during which time they must pass such nautical and practical examination as may by General Order be directed, failing which tlieir commissions will not be confirmed. The time of probation, however, may be extended on the recommendation of the Commandant for a period not exceeding six months.

2.    Arrangements will be made for attaching Officers on probation, if they desire it, to the Permanent Force, for instruction in their duties.

3.    Officers appointed under clause 1 shall receive acting commissions.

4.    All recommendations for appointments, promotions, and resignations of Officers will be made by Commanding Officers, through the proper channel, to the Commandant.

5.    The appointments, promotions, and resignations of Officers shall be inserted in the Government Gazette.

6.    The appointment of Honorary Chaplains is allowed on the recommendation of the Commandant.

7.    Retirement of Officers.—

Warrant Officers retire at the age of 50.

Engineers retire at the age of 50.

Lieutenants retire at the age of 45.

Commanders retire at the age of 50.

Captains retire at the age of 55.

But the Governor in Council may, nevertheless, on the recommendation of the Commandant, require any Officer who would otherwise so retire, notwithstanding his age, to continue to perform his duty.

8.    Officers, not under the rank of Lieutenant, after ten years’ commissioned service in the Naval Forces, may be allowed to retire with permission to retain their rank and wear their uniform.

9.    Any Officer applying may, on the recommendation of the Commandant, be placed on the unattached list. Officers on the unattached list shall not, as such, receive any pay.

10.    The services of unattached Officers are at all times to be at the disposal of the Commandant. Unattached Officers are not to perform any duty unless ordered to do so by the Commandant.

11.    Before promotion to the rank of Sub-Lieutenant or Lieutenant, candidates must pass an examination in professional subjects. Officers may, however, on the recommendation of the Commandant, be promoted without passing such an examination on the condition that they do so on the first available opportunity. The promotion of Officers who fail to pass the examination within a reasonable time will be cancelled.

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All Officers shall wear full dress and undress uniform of similar description and pattern in every particular to that worn in the Royal Navy, but substituting a diamond instead of the executive loop in the upper ring of the distinction lace.

Petty Officers and seamen shall wear the same uniform as worn in the Victorian Permanent Naval Force, with the exception of a distinctive white piping on the outside seam of the trousers, and white piping on shoulder seams of monkey jackets.

Members of the Force must appear in authorized uniform, or in purely civilian dress.

All Officers will be paid an allowance (as per scale) for uniform on entry, or on promotion from Petty Officer to Warrant Officer, but no further allowances will be made. The following shall be the scale of allowance for uniforms:—

Commissioned Officers, on entry ...    ... £18 15    0

Warrant and Subordinate Officers, on entry £16    0    0

Warrant and Subordinate Officers, on promotion to that rank ...    ...    ... £16    0    0

Every member below the rank of Officer will be supplied with uniform, which must be kept in good condition, fair wear and tear only excepted.

SECTION X.—MEDICAL BRANCH.

1.    The Officers of the Medical Branch will, subject to the orders of the Commandant, be detailed for duty by, and be under the immediate command of, the Principal Naval Medical Officer, whether Permanent or Brigade, both for discipline and professional supervision.

2.    When on active service, or in camp, they will be employed in general, station, or field hospitals, and on all such special duties in camp or on board as the Principal Naval Medical Officer may decide.

3. The Regulations for the Medical Department of Her Majesty’s Navy to be the Regulations for the Naval Medical Branch in so far as they can be applied, more especially in „respect to constitution, general duties, hospital organization and management, supply of surgical instruments, appliances, and materials, medicines and medical materials, medical examination I of recruits, sanitary regulations, aud general regulations.

id. Medical Officers will be detailed for duty with the various Subdivisions or Divisions, and will, on the application of the Commanding Officer, perform, without further reference, the undermentioned duty:—

Examination of recruits on certain nights, to be fixed by the Commanding Officer in conjunction with the Medical Officer.

5. Attendance at gun and rifle practice and muster will be .■arranged for by the Principal Naval Medical Officer. .

6. In the event of an Officer being unable to attend to any of the foregoing duties, he will either make arrangements with some other Medical Officer to take bis place (informing the Commanding Officer) or report to the Principal Naval Medical Officer in sufficient time to enable him to provide for the duties.

7. The Medical Officers will be required to give professional attendance to the Drill Instructors who may be attached to the Divisions at the several stations.

8. Medical Officers will be liable to be detailed for Boards, &c., where the attendance of a Medical Officer is necessary.

9. Medical Officers will receive pay as follows:—

(«.) For examination of recruits, 2s. 6d. a head.

(¿.) For other military duties—

Surgeons, £2 for whole day.

Ditto, £1 for half day.

Staff Surgeons, £2 10s. for whole day.

Ditto, £1 os. for half day.

(c.) The maximum amount of pay, however derivable from the various sources, shall uot exceed iu one year £36 for a Surgeon, and £48 for a Staff Surgeon.

1. Any member of the Brigade who violates or neglects to observe any command or injunction contained in the foregoing Rules and Regulations shall be guilty of a minor offence against discipline.

ADDITION TO THE REGULATIONS FOR THE VICTORIAN NAVAL BRIGADE.

All Rules and Regulations for the discipline and internal economy of the Victorian Permanent Naval Forces shall be applicable to the members of the Naval Brigade when serving or drilling afloat in the armed vessels of the Victorian Permanent Naval Forces or in vessels attached thereto.

And the Honorable Frederick Thomas Sargood, Her Majesty^ Minister of Defence for Victoria, shall give the necessary directions herein accordingly.

ROB. WADSWORTH.

Clerk of the Executive Council.

By Authority: John Ferres, Government Printer, Melbourne.

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