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HOUSEHOLD & BEA UTY HINTS

Hundreds of Tips on Cooking, Laundering Cleaning, Glamor and Home First Aid

AN INVINCIBLE PRESS PUBLICATION

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Hundreds

Cooking,

Cleaning,

Home


of    Tips on

Laundering Clamor and First Aid


PUBLISHED BY

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FOREWORD

T

I HESE hints have been compiled for the housewife who takes a pride in her home, her sewing and her personal glamor; who likes a shining house, but never forgets that it is possible to be house-proud, and still keep her beauty fresh and charming.

Cooking tips, hints on good housekeeping, home treatment of household accidents, flower arrangement, useful sewing hints, and recipes for glamor, slimming diet and exercises, have been gathered into this useful publication. . Bride or experienced housewife will find them invaluable right round the clock of every working day.

Section 1—Cookery Wisdom:

Hints .. ........... 1    to    95

Section 2—Washing Day “Wrinkles”:

Hints.............. 96    to    145

Section 3—Sewing Snippets:

Hints..............146    to    164

Section 4—Tips in General:

Hints..............165    to    268

Section 5—Guide to Glamor and Home First Aid:

Hints.............. 269    to    300


SECTION 1 COOKERY WISDOM

Subject.    Hint. No.

BUTTER:

To Preserve ............................ 1

Substitute in Cake Making .................. 2

CAKES:

Icing Easily............................ 8

Mixing Tip.............................. f

To Freshen When Stale...................... 5

COFFEE:

To Clear.............................. 8

To Keep Fresh............................ 7

Use for Grounds.......................... 8

EGGS:

Beating Test.............................. 9

To Beat Quickly............................1°

Boiling When Cracked........................H

Preventing Cracking........................12

Preserving ...........................13

FRUIT:    .

Apples: To Keep Fresh........................14

Bananas: To Prevent Discoloring................15

Dried Fruits: To Cut ........................10

Dried Fruits: To Mince .................... I7

Lemons: To Keep Fresh....................13

Lemons: To Restore Freshness................19

Oranges: To Peel Easily....................20

Oranges: Peel as Cake Flavoring................21

Pears: Cooking Pointer ....................22

Preserving................................23

Stewing.................................24

Stoning..................................25

FISH:

Removing Odor..........................26

Scaling ................................27

To Prevent Breaking........................28

GINGERBREAD MAKING......................29

JAM MAKING:

Jar Covers..............................30

Labelling..................................31

To Fill Jars..............................32

To Open Screw Tops........................33

Unusual Flavoring........................34

LETTUCE: To Freshen..........................35

MEAT:

Basting................................36

Cooking Corned Beef........................37

Crisping Pork............................38

Frying..................................39

Grilling.............................40

To Grill Flat..............................41

To Make Tender..........................42

To Prevent Roast Shrinking................43

To Skin Brains............................44

Tasty Flavoring............................45

MILK:

To Boil Without Catching....................46

To Sour for Cooking ......................47

MINT: To Keep Fresh .......................48

PANCAKE MAKING............................49

PASTRY:

To Roll in Hot Weather......................50

To Make Flaky............................51

To Overcome Sodden Texture..................52

PICKLING POINTER............................53

PIE CRUST GLAZING........................54

POULTRY: To Pluck..........................55

RECIPES:

Appetisers for the Invalid—

(a)    Egg Beef Tea ......................84

(b)    Egg Jelly........................85

Baking Powder..........................86

French Mustard..........................87

Mock Pears............................88

Peanut Butter..............................89

Pickling Meat............................90

Salad Base..............................91

Summer Syrups—

Boston Cream ........................92

Lemon..............................93

Passionfruit...........................94

Rhubarb Punch........................95

SANDWICHES: To Keep Fresh....................56

SAUCEPANS:

To Remove Burnt    Food......................57

To Brighten..............................58

To Repair..............................59

SAUCES:

How to Serve............................80

Caper Making............................81

To Prevent Lumping........................82

To Prevent Fermenting......................83

SOUPS: Removing Burnt Flavor.................60

SUGAR:

To Prevent Lumping........................61

TONGUES: To Skin..........................62

TOMATOES: To Make Firm......................63

To Bake................................64

VEGETABLES:

Beetroot Cooking..........................65

Beetroot Cutting..........................66

Carrot Top Garnish..........................67

Cauliflower Leaves as Vegetables................68

Cleaning................................69

Cooking Successfully........................70

Crisping Potatoes..........................71

Odor Removing—

(a)    Cabbage..........................72

(b)    Onion............................73

Onion Frying............................74

Potato Water for Gravy......................75

Preserving..............................76

Removing Insects..........................77

To Keep Fresh............................78

WALNUTS:

To Shell..................................79

SECTION 2

WASHING DAY “WRINKLES”

BLANKETS:

Washing Method..........................96

Drying..................................97

Finishing and Storing........................98

COLORED GARMENTS........................99

CURTAINS:

Washing Frail Fabric........................100

To Make Fire Resistant......................101

Rehanging..............................102

Test for Prints............................103

Tinting................................104

To Set Colors............................105

Ironing................................106

DRYING HINT..............................107

EIDERDOWNS................................108

GIRDLES: Maintaining Shape..................109

PULLOVERS................................110

RAINCOATS ................................Ill

SHEETS....................................112

SILKS:

Crepe Garments ..........................113

Other Silks.............................. 114

STARCH:

Improving Starch........................115

To Gloss................................116

Substitute..............................117

TO MAKE BLUE LAST..........................118

TO PREVENT DISCOLORING IN BOIL............119

TO REMOVE STAINS:

Blood................................120

Coffee..................................121

Egg....................................122

Fruit..................................123

Grass ................................124

Grease................................125

Ink..................................126

Iron Mould..............................127

Iron Rust ............:..................128

Lipstick................................129

Mildew................................130

Paint..................................131

Perspiration............................132

Tar......................................133

Water....................................134

Wine..................................135

Obstinate Stains..........................136

WASHING FLUID............................137

WHITENING:

Tea Towels................................138

Handkerchiefs ..........................139

IRONING POINTERS

CARE OF IRON:

Cleaning ..............................140

Removing Starch..........................141

Storing ..............................142

RUNNING REPAIRS..........................143

DAMPING IN HURRY..........................144

IRONING BOARD COVER......................145

SECTION 3 SEWING SNIPPETS

BUTTONS THAT CLIP ON......................146

CHILDREN’S FROCKS HINT:

Patches to Match........................147

Buttonholes that Last......................148

CUTTING OUT EASILY ........................149

ELASTIC SAVING............................150

GLOVE DARNING ..........................151

“INVISIBLE” MEND FOR SKIRT..................152

MACHINING HEAVY MATERIALS................153

MAKING CURTAINS ..........................154

MAKING LOOSE COVERS......................155

NEEDLES: To Keep Rustless......................156

OVERHAULING A LACE FROCK..................157

PATTERN CARE............................158

SCISSOR SHARPENING........................159

SWEATERS:

Mending................................160

Renovating..............................161

TABLECLOTH REPAIRS................ 162

TROUSER REPAIRS:

Cuff Pieces............................163

Pockets................................164

SECTION 4 TIPS IN GENERAL

BATHROOM CARE:

Cupboards ............................165

Tile Cleaning...........................166

Tub Polishing............................167

BOLTS AND HINGES:

To Open Door When Fittings are Rusty............168

BOOKS: Storing............................169

Protective Cover..........................170

BOTTLES: To Clean.......................... 171

BREAD: To Cut When Fresh..................172

To Keep..............................173

BROOMS:

For Added Wear ........................174

For Crushed Bristles......................175

For Limp Bristles..........................176

Strengthening............................177

Polisher from Old Broom....................178

CANDLE PRESERVER ..........................179

CARPENTRY TIP..............................180

CASSEROLE DISH CLEANING..................181

CLOCK CARE..............................182

CLOTHES CLEANING:

Dark Suits..............................I83

Spots From Flimsy Fabric....................184

To Remove Powder Marks..................185

COCKTAIL TABLE MADE AT HOME....... 186

CUTLERY: To Remove Fish Odor ................187

DUSTPAN TIP..............................188

ELECTRIC STOVE CLEANING....................189

ENAMELLED DOOR CLEANING.................-190

FIREPLACE BRIGHTENER.....................191

FLOOR-CRACK REPAIRS......................192

FLOOR STAINING............................193

FLOWERS:

Arranging..............................194

Color Tip................................195

Flowerpot Decoration ......................196

For Woody Stems........................197

To Keep Fresh............................198

Vase Hint....................... 199

FUR CLEANING..............................20°

FURNITURE CLEANING:

Bamboo................................201

Carved..................................202

Leather................................203

Polished..............................204

Upholstered..............................205

Varnished..............................206

FURNITURE CREAM..........................207

FURNITURE REVIVER........................208

FURNITURE SCRATCHES: To Camouflage............209

FURNITURE COVERS..........................210

GAS ECONOMY..............................211

GARBAGE TIN FRESHENER....................212

GLASSES: To Separate When Stuck..............213

HANDBAG RENOVATING......................214

HATS:

To Clean Felt............................215

To Stiffen Brim ..........................216

ICE CHEST:

To Remove Odor.............•'..............217

To Keep Pipe Free..........................218

KETTLE SWEETENER........................219

KNIFE CLEANING:

Blades..................................220

Handles................................221

MATCH SAVING............................222

METAL POLISHING:

Brass................................223

Copper..................................224

Nickel..................................225

MICE: To Get Rid Of........................226

MIRRORS: To Polish........................227

MIXER: To Use Without Mess....................228

MOTH KILLER..............................229

OILCLOTH REPAIRING........................230

PAINT BRUSH CLEANING ......................231

PAINT REMOVING ............................232

PAINTING WITHOUT MESS....................233

PANTRY REFRESHER........................234

PASTE RECIPE..............................235

PATHS: To Remove Oil Stains....................236

PETROL CLEANING TIP........................237

PIANO KEY WHITENING ......................238

REFRIGERATOR POLISH......................239

REMOVING IODINE STAIN....................240

REMOVING TOBACCO FUMES....................241

RUBBER GLOVE CARE    242

RUGS:

To Clean................................243

To Keep Flat............................244

SALT SHAKERS:

Filling....................................245

Storing ................................246

SHOES:

Cleaning ..............................247

Dyeing................................248

SILVERFISH REPELLANT......................249

SILVER:

Polishing................................250

Storing..................................251

SINK: To Clean When Blocked..................252

SPIDER REPELLENT..........................253

STOCKINGS:

To Prevent Rain Spots......................254

To Remove Grass Seeds......................255

TABLE BAIZE TIP........ 256

TEAPOT: To Clean Spout......................257

TOWEL ECONOMY..........................258

VARNISHING GUIDE..........................259

VEILING: To Restore Crispness.................260

VENETIAN BLIND HINT........................261

WASHING-UP ..............................262

WINDOWS:

To Clean..................... 263

To Facilitate Opening......................264

To Clean Blinds..........................265

WINDSCREEN MIXTURE........................266

WOODWORK CLEANING......................267

WOOL: To Prepare For Re-knitting................268

SECTION 5

GUIDE TO GLAMOR AND HOME FIRST AID

BEAUTY

EYES: Exercises for Strengthening................269

FACE:

Correct Cleansing..........................270

Cleansing Lotion..........................271

Face Packs............................272

Refresher ..............................273

To Soften Water..........................274

FEET:

Callous Remover..........................275

Corn Remover ............................276

For Tired Feet    277

HAIR: Dandruff Remedy......................278

Massage................................279

Shampooing..............................280

HANDS: Hints for Gardeners....................281

Nail Care ..............................282

To Soften and Whiten......................283

HIPS: Reducing Exercises........................284

MAKE-UP:

Applying Cream Rouge......................285

Eyebrow Trick.........................., . 286

Lipstick Art..............................287

PEP COCKTAIL ..............................288

PERFUME SAVING............................289

SLIMMING DIET............................290

SUNTANNING LOTION ........................291

TO RELIEVE FATIGUE........................292

TO SWEETEN BREATH ........................293

FIRST AID

BITES AND STINGS:

Bee Stings..............................294

Insect Bites..............................295

Ticks..................................296

BLISTERED HEELS..........................297

BRUISES..................................298

BURNS AND SCALDS..........................299

CUTS....................................300

COOKERY WISDOM
Buffer

1    Butter may be preserved for months by wrapping it in a piece of muslin or old linen and storing it in brine water in a cool place.

2    Equal parts of chicken fat, butter and suet are as effective as all-butter ingredient for rich layer cakes.

Cakes

3    Flour shaken over the top of a cake to be iced will prevent the icing from running over the sides of the cake.

4    Try mixing your cake mixture with hot water instead of cold. You will find the cake will rise very quickly

as it is already heated when put into the oven. Nor will fruit sink or make it heavy.

5    Put that stale cake in a towel and place in a slightly warmed oven for a few minutes, and it will come out fresh again.

Coffee

6    Half an eggshell well washed and added to coffee will clear grounds.

7    Coffee will keep fresh much longer is you keep it in a closely sealed jar in the refrigerator. Buy coifee in small quantities to get best results.

8    Coffee grounds make an excellent fertilizer for indoor plants.

Eggs

9    When a recipe requires a number of eggs beaten together, be sure to break each egg separately into a saucer before putting in a bowl. Thus the risk of one not-so-fresh egg spoiling the lot will be eliminated.

10    You should add a few drops of water to an egg before beating it for cakes, etc. Few amateur cooks know this makes the egg beat more lightly and more quickly.

11    If a cracked egg is rubbed with dripping before being put into water, it will boil without bursting.

12    Put eggs under a running tap before boiling them. This will prevent cracking.

13    Never wipe egg shells over with a damp cloth before putting away. Washing removes the protective film, and hastens evaporation. Eggs packed in salt will keep for some time.

Fruit

14    Apples will stand for some time without discoloring if they are dropped into cold salted water until required.

15    If after peeling bananas you hold them under the tap for a few minutes, they will not go brown when put in fruit salads.

1G Floured scissors will cut dried fruits, marshmallows, etc., in double-quick time.

1/ Lemon juice added to dates before passing them through the chopper will help them run through more easily.

18    To keep lemons fresh, place in a dish of cold water, changing the water every third day.

19    Lemons which have become dry should be placed in a hot oven. Leave for a few minutes, and they will come out plump again.

20    When preparing oranges for salad, place in hot water for a few minutes before peeling. This way, the skin is much easier to remove.

21    Save the peel from oranges. Dry it in the oven until hard, then break it into small pieces or put through mincer. Store in a tin or jar and you will have a delicious flavoring for cakes.

22    Always leave the stalks on pears when cooking them. This ensures a rare flavor.

23    Fruit should be fresh for preserving and slightly underripe. Bottles must be sterilised and air-tight, and rubber rings new. Wide-mouthed bottles are best for the larger fruits, and pickle bottles and smaller types for gooseberries, cherries etc.

24    When stewing any kind of fruit, add a pinch of bicarbonate of soda and much less sugar will be required. If fruit is very sour, add a little salt.

25    To stone cherries and other fruits, soak in boiling water for a few minutes. Stones are then very easily removed.

Fish

26    If the odor of fish clings to the cooking pan, sprinkle the pan with damp tea leaves, fill with cold water and leave for an hour when the odor will have been removed.

27    If fish scales are obstinate, place the fish in hot water for a minute, then dip in cold water. Scales should then come off without difficulty. When frying fish, see that the fat is at boiling point before putting in the fish.

28    Fish will not break in cooking if salted and left for a few hours before being placed in the pan.

Gingerbread

29    If you prefer dark gingerbread, add a tablespoon of melted chocolate to the treacle (or syrup) and spices. This also gives a delicious flavor.

Jam

30    Dip tissue paper in milk and cover jams, chutneys, etc., while they are hot. The heat will dry the paper, and make it like parchment.

31    Adhesive tape makes the best labels for jars and tins on the pantry shelf. It will not pull off easily.

32    Use a gravy boat for filling jars with jam, jelly, etc. It is easily dipped into a pan of hot fruit, and the long mouth fits into jars and prevents spilling.

33    For obstinate screw top jars and bottles, try tapping the top sharply a few times on a hard surface.

34    Add a few shelled almonds to fig and apricot jams. They improve the flavor and ensure better keeping.

Lettuce

35 A lettuce will revive and keep fresh several days if it is sprinkled with water and placed in a saucepan with a tightly fitting lid.

Meat

36    An easy and appetising way to baste meat—fill a small muslin bag with suet and a little herbs, pepper and salt. Tie bag to oven slide. When oven gets hot, suet will run all over meat and the herbs give a nice flavor, especially to legs of lamb.

37    The juice of half a lemon added to the water in which corned beef is cooked improves taste and color of the meat.

38    To crisp crackling on a leg of pork, rub a little lemon juice over it before cooking. Another way is to cut the crackling very deep and rub in finely chopped onion mixed with powdered sage and a good seasoning.

39    When frying, add a little salt to the bottom of the pan to keep fat from spattering.

40    For grilling meat, heat should be intense at first to seal the juices, then lowered. Use tongs for turning grills. Never stick with a fork or you will lose the valuable juices.

41    To prevent the meat from curling up under the flame when grilling steak or chops, cut across the outside fatty part before beginning to cook the meat.

42 Tough meat can be made quite tender if a tablespoon of vinegar is poured over it just before cooking.

43 A pinch of soda mixed with salt on the top of the roast will help prevent shrinkage.

44    When soaking brains add one dessertspoon of vinegar to the water and leave for ten minutes. The skin can

then be peeled off easily and cleanly.

45    Parsley, mint and celery leaves may be washed, dried in a very slow oven, then powdered and stored in sprinkler top jars or tins. Very useful when flavoring meat dishes.

Milk

46    When boiling milk, wet the bottom of the saucepan well with cold water before adding the milk, and the milk will

not stick to the saucepan.

47    If you wish to use sour milk in a recipe and have none, add 1J tablespoons of lemon juice to each cup of milk. This does the trick.

Mint

48    Mint and parsley will keep garden fresh if you store in screw-top jars in the refrigerator.

Pancake Making

49    A pancake secret: Once the batter is ready for cooking, do not stir or beat it again. Doing so makes the pancakes tough and unappetising.

Pastry

50    When rolling pastry in hot weather, use a smooth bottle filled with icy-cold water. The cool “rolling pin” will help make the pastry flaky.

51    Another way to make the pastry of a tart or pie flaky, is to sprinkle paste with cold water before putting it in the oven.

52    If the inside of a mince tart or pie is first coated with beaten white of egg and left for a quarter of an hour before filling with mixture, the pastry will not become sodden.

Pickling

53    When pickling, always use the best of vinegar, and never mix two kinds.

Pie Crust Glazing

54    Paint your top pie crusts with a mixture of beaten egg and water before putting in the oven. This gives them an attractive glaze.

Plucking Poultry

55    When plucking poultry, you will find that a teaspoon of common soda added to a bucket of very hot water will enable the plucking to be done with ease.

Keeping Sandwiches Fresh

56    When making meat or fish sandwiches, work a few drops of lemon juice into the butter before spreading. This improves the flavor and prevents the sandwiches from going dry.

Saucepans

57    Fill burnt saucepans with salt and water, leave to soak for a few hours and then bring slowly to the boil. Never put soda in burnt saucepans.

58    One teaspoon of cream of tartar to a quart of water boiled in aluminium will brighten the metal.

59    To repair enamel saucepans, mix a little flour with the white of an egg (that which is left in the shell after using an egg will do) and apply to the cavity. Allow the paste to harden well and it will then stand heat and be waterproof.

Soup

60    Add peanut butter to soup which has been burnt and stir well before lifting it off the stove. The burnt taste will be eliminated.

Sugar

61    To keep brown sugar from becoming “lumpy,” place a small piece of apple with skin on in the container.

Skinning Tongues

62    Sometimes the skin from boiled tongues will not come off readily. If a teaspoon of carbonate of soda is added to the boiling tongues the process of removing the skin will be easy.

Tomatoes

63    Place over-ripe and pulpy tomatoes in a basin of cold water with a little salt added. After a few minutes they will become quite firm.

64    Use small patty pans or mince pie tins in which to bake tomatoes. The tomatoes will thus keep their shape.

Vegetable Tips

65    Half a teaspoon of carbonate of soda added to the water in which beetroot is cooked will improve flavor and color.

66    If beetroot is stringy when you are cutting it, cut from the top down. You will find the stringy texture disappears.

G7.Carrot tops make excellent garnishing when parsley is unprocurable.

68    Cauliflower leaves cooked well, and served with a little butter make quite a tasty vegetable, resembling Brussels sprouts.

69    When vegetables are very sandy, wash in warm instead of cold water.

70    Do not drown vegetables in water when cooking; use only enough to keep them from catching. Half-a-cup of water is plenty for most vegetables. Add a dot of butter, if you can spare it. Vegetables cook much quicker this way: bring to boil, then reduce heat until sufficient to keep water just bubbling. Twenty minutes should be enough to cook carrots, peas, cabbage. Fifteen minutes for beans. This way all vitamins are preserved.

71    Peeling and leaving potatoes too long in cold water before cooking takes the starch out of them, and you will never get really crisp baked potatoes unless you peel and wash just before putting them in with the roast.

72    A piece of fresh white bread placed in the saucepan in which cabbage or cauliflower is cooked will prevent that disagreeable odor from pervading the house.

73    After peeling onions, rub a little mustard on the hands and the odor will disappear.

74    A pinch of sugar added to onions while they are being fried will completely remove any danger of indigestion.

75    Potato water is excellent for making gravy. Use instead of plain water.

76    Root vegetables may be preserved for a long time by the simple means of a packing case and a bag of sand. Wipe, but do not wash vegetables. Put a layer of sand at the bottom of the case, then a layer of vegetables,

household and beauty hints

cover with more sand, and so on until full. Store, and you will have fresh carrots, parsnips, beets, artichokes, etc., when these vegetables are scarce.

77    A little vinegar, or a pinch of borax in the washing water will remove insects from green vegetables.

78    Green and yellow vegetables should be used as soon as possible after purchasing. Keep in a closed dish m refrigerator.

Shelling Walnuts

79    One of the easiest ways to peel walnuts when wanted for a cake, etc., is to soak them in cold water for a few minutes. Almonds left in hot water for live minutes will peel as you handle them.

SAUCES AND HOW TO SERVE THEM

80    WITH STEAK OR CUTLETS: Browned butter sauce.

WITH ROAST MUTTON: Red currant jelly or onion sauce.

WITH ROAST DUCK: Apple sauce, sage and onions, orange sauce, or orange salad.

WITH ROAST PORK: Apple sauce.

ROAST GOOSE: Orange sauce.

ROAST VEAL: Watercress sauce.

ROAST CHICKEN: Bread sauce.

BOILED CHICKEN: White sauce, parsley sauce.

BOILED BEEF: Dumplings and gravy.

BOILED MUTTON: Caper, onion or parsley sauce.

Caper Making

81    Gather nasturtium seeds when they are young, wash and dry. Place in a glass jar, and cover with the follow-

Pagc Tweniy-two

ing: 1 pint of vinegar, 1 oz. salt, 6 peppercorns. Keep for one month or longer before using.

To Prevent Lumping

82 When making white sauce, allow milk to warm before pouring it on the flour and butter. This will prevent it from going lumpy.

To Prevent Fermenting

83    If cloves are added when making tomato sauce, they will prevent sauce from fermenting. About one ounce to 20 lbs. sauce.

QUICK RECIPES

84    EGG BEEF TEA: Pour a small cup of hot beef

tea over a well-beaten and strained fresh egg, stirring well. Heat in a saucepan without boiling, and serve.

85    EGG JELLY: Pare two washed lemons finely, put rind and strained juice into a pan with i lb. sugar, and bring to the boil.. Add £ oz. gelatine, let it dissolve well, then cool slightly. Beat two new-laid eggs and add to the mixture gradually, beating well all the time. Stand in a saucepan at the side of the stove for a while, but do not allow mixture to boil. Strain into a mould, and chill.

86    BAKING POWDER: Mix well together half a pound of cream of tartar, half a pound of ground rice, five ounces of carbonate of soda, one ounce of tartaric acid. Roll out well with a rolling pin, and put through a fine sieve.

87    FRENCH MUSTARD: One tablespoon of mustard, one dessertspoon of curry powder, one teaspoon of sugar, pinch of salt. Mix with strong cold tea.

88    MOCK PEARS: Peel some young chokos, take out the seeds, cut lengthwise into four pieces, and put in a saucepan with enough water to cover. Add three tablespoons of sugar, the juice of half a lemon, and a few drops of cochineal. Boil slowly until tender; serve with cream or custard. A piece of preserved ginger in the centre of each piece is an improvement.

89    PEANUT BUTTER: Put one pound of shelled peanuts through the finest mincer, then mix with £ oz. of butter and a teaspoon of salt. Put through line mincer again. This will keep indefinitely.

90    PICKLING MEAT: A pound and a half of bay or common salt, one ounce saltpetre, six ounces of brown sugar, four quarts of cold water. Put all into an enamel saucepan, bring to the boil, then simmer for fifteen minutes, skimming well. Strain and use when cold. Place meat in pickle, well covered by the brine. Leave for about ten days. Remove the meat and wash, then tie into shape, and cook in the usual way.

91    SALAD BASE: Liquid left over from mustard pickles is an excellent substitute for mustard and vinegar in the salad dressing.

SUMMER SYRUPS

92    BOSTON CREAM: One and a half lbs. sugar, 1£ pints water, 1 tablespoon tartaric acid. Boil together for 15 minutes, strain and when cold add the white of 1 egg beaten to a stiff froth. Stir well. Use 2 tablespoons to a tumbler of iced water, add a teaspoon of baking soda, and drink while fizzing.

93    LEMON SYRUP: Three lemons, 1 lb. sugar, 1 pint boiling water, £ oz. citric acid. Peel the rind of the lemons very thinly, and place in a saucepan with sugar and water. Boil for 10 minutes, remove from the stove, and add lemon juice (squeezed after peeling) and citric acid. Leave until cold, strain and bottle. One tablespoon added to water makes a delicious summer drink.

94    PASSIONFRUIT SYRUP: Scoop out the pulp of 2 dozen passionfruit into a large jug, and add 3 scant teaspoons of tartaric acid. Boil together 3 cups of sugar for 20 minutes, and pour over the fruit and acid. When cold, strain and bottle. One wineglass to a tumbler of iced water gives you a delicious and healthful drink.

95    RHUBARB PUNCH: One lb. rhubarb, 1 stick of cinnamon, i cup of lemon juice, 1 cup of pineapple juice, quart of water. Wash rhubarb, cut into small pieces, and cook with cinnamon and water for 10 minutes or longer. Strain, add sugar, then chill and add remaining ingredients. Serve with plenty of ice.

SECTION 2
WASHING DAY "WRINKLES" BLANKETS

96    Wash in lukewarm water, and never use a harsh soap. Squeeze but do not rub, and don’t wring out. Three rinses in clear water, or if the garden hose is handy, it is a good plan to hose blankets while they are on the line. If a washing machine is used, wash each blanket separately, and do not leave in the machine more than three minutes.

97    Do not use clothes pegs when hanging out blankets. Stretch over the clothesline in a sunny spot, and let them drip. Plenty of shaking will restore fluffiness.

98    If your blankets have bound edges, press binding with a warm iron. When storing for summer, cover with moth

repellent and wrap in heavy paper. Store in a closed chest, trunk or drawer.

Colored Garments

99 When washing colored garments, add a teaspoonful of Epsom salts to each gallon of water and the most delicate shades will neither run nor fade.

Curtains

100    Frail curtains, which look as though they won’t stand another wash should be placed in a cheesecloth bag and dunked gently through warm suds. Starch very lightly and iron with care.

101    Did you know that you can make curtains fire-resistant by dipping them in a solution of seven ounces of borax and three ounces of boric acid, dissolved in two quarts of hot water? Immerse curtains and dry.

102    The roughened edge of a brass curtain rod will not tear your freshly laundered curtains if the finger of an old glove is placed over the end of the rod. Curtains will then slip on with the greatest of ease.

103    If in doubt about washing printed curtains try damping a corner and rubbing lightly with a white cloth. If a stain appears on the white cloth the curtains are not washable and should be sent to a cleaner.

1U4 To tint washable curtains put the required amount of dye in the washing machine. The quick whirling through the machine produces a good even dye.

105    To set colors: Alum in rinsing water will preserve the color in most fabrics.

106    When ironing window curtains press across, not up and down.

Drying Hint

107    Dry woollens and silks in the shade, linens and white cottons in bright sunlight.

Eiderdowns

108    Eiderdowns can be washed quite well, using a good lather of soapy water. Squeeze and press well under the water. Rinse thoroughly in warm water, using a cup of vinegar in each rinse to keep and brighten the colors. Dry in the sun, and air in front of the fire.

Girdles

109    Use tepid water and mild suds for washing girdles. Squeeze gently, and use a soft brush on soiled spots. Roll lengthwise in a towel after rinsing well. Squeeze out moisture, pat into shape, and hang by garters away from heat.

Pullovers

110    Run a string round the necks of sweaters to keep them in shape when washing. For cardigans, sew buttonholes together and so keep them from stretching.

Raincoats

111    To wash a dirty raincoat or macintosh, soak for several hours in water to which a large lump of borax has been added. Rinse thoroughly, and hang in the open without wringing. Lined proofed coats can be ironed lightly on the wrong side.

Sheets

112    When hanging sheets and tablecloths on the line, place both hems together evenly and peg to line with five or six pegs each. They will keep straight and you will never have whipped corners.

Silks

113 A cupful of vinegar with a small quantity of starch dissolved in it is a good final rinse for silk crepe dresses.

(14 When rinsing other silk things put a teaspoon of methylated spirits in the water. The articles will iron out smoothly.

Starching

115    When making starch, add a small quantity of Epsom salts. This not only gives a glossier and better finish to ironed articles, but will also keep silver fish from making inroads on starched linen which has to be stored.

116    To put a gloss on starched things add a few drops of turpentine to the starch.

117    Water in which rice has been cooked is excellent for stiffening dainty collars, lace edgings, etc.

Blue

118    A knob of blue lasts longer when wrapped in a square of woollen material such as winceyette. As soon as squeezing ceases the blue stops oozing out.

For A "White" Boil

119    To keep boiling clothes a beautiful color, put one wine glass of kerosene to one teaspoon of borax in the copper. The solution will not stain or smell.

REMOVING STAINS

Always try to remove stains before washing in the ordinary way.—Methods:

120    BLOOD: Soak in cold water, then wash with warm water

and lots of soap.

121    COFFEE STAINS: Strong soda water is best for coffee. Stretch the garment over a basin and pour the hot soda water through the stain. Then wash in the usual way. This method is for washable articles only.

122    EGG: For egg stains on wool, use plain cold water; on silk, rub gently with benzine.

123    FRUIT: Sprinkle thickly with salt as soon as possible while juice is still wet. Leave on until salt is absorbed. Any remaining stain may be washed off with warm water without soap.

124    GRASS: Cover the green spot with kerosene before washing. For grass stains on wool, rub with butter and rinse in petrol.

125    GREASE: Delicate fabrics should be treated with eucalyptus after sponging lightly with tepid water. Then rub the stain with a clean cloth.

12,S INK. Soak immediately in milk, and if a stain remains rinse in a weak solution of chloride of lime. For colored materials, try a paste of mustard and water and leave for 15 minutes. Then wash in warm water, rinse and dry.

127    IRON MOULD STAINS: To remove iron mould stains, make a stiff paste of salts of lemon and water, using a wooden spoon for mixing. Leave the paste on the stain foi & tew minutes, then remove with a cloth wrung out in warm water. Dry well.

128    IRON RUST: Soak first in lemon juice, sprinkle with plenty of salt, and leave in the sun to bleach.

129    LIPSTICK: If washable, sponge the spots with kerosene or tetrachloride. Methylated spirit or eucalyptus will often leinove lipstick from materials which won’t wash.

130    MILDEW: Soak in a weak solution of chloride of lime,

and rinse well in cold, clear water. Or boil mildewed article for 20 minutes in sufficient buttermilk to cover. Rinse very thoroughly. Leave to bleach on the grass, day and night for several days. Then boil in the usual manner.

131    PAINT: Should be dealt with as quickly as possible. If still wet, wipe off as much as possible, then wet a flannel in spirits of turpentine or spirit of wine, and rub the mark thoroughly. Two or three applications may be necessary.

132    PERSPIRATION: Soak article in water to which a teaspoon of ammonia has been added, then rub stain with a freshly-cut lemon. Wash thoroughly. Carbonate of soda and water is another good mixture for perspiration stains.

133    TAR: Soften spot with lard, then soak in turpentine. Sponge with turpentine until clean and rub gently until dry.

134    WATER: Use a cloth wrung out in a 5 per cent, solution of acetic acid. NOT stronger.

135    WINE: Use salt in the same way as for fruit stains, rubbing well into the spilt wine. Wash as soon as possible after salt is well absorbed.

136    OBSTINATE STAINS: Mix together £ cup methylated spirits, £ cup peroxide, juice of two large lemons, £ cup cloudy ammonia, and £ cup of glycerine. Strain. Apply the mixture to the stain and allow to stand for a while, then wash in the ordinary way. This is an effective preparation for cleaning men’s overcoats, felt hats, etc.

Washing Fluid

137    TO MAKE: 2 lbs. caustic soda, £ lb. lump ammonia, £ lb. borax, 6d. salts of tartar. Put all into a deep tin, and add 2 quarts of boiling water. When dissolved, add 8 quarts of cold water. Bottle and cork tightly. For every copper of clothes add 1 small cup of fluid and a little soap.

Whitening

138    Lemon peelings dropped in with white tea towels when being boiled will keep them snowy white.

139    If white handkerchiefs have become discolored, soak before boiling in a pan of cold water in which a quarter teaspoon of cream of tartar has been dissolved.

IRONING POINTERS

140    If your electric iron has become soiled, rub it on some salt sprinkled on a newspaper. Never try to scratch off dirt from an iron.

141    Wash dry starch off the electric iron with a damp, soapy cloth while the iron is cool.

142    Never wrap the iron cord round the iron while it is hot. Even mild heat will destroy the cord.

143    Keep a box containing thread, needles and buttons on the ironing board and do minor repairs as you notice them.

Damping in a Hurry

144    If it is necessary to hurriedly iron an article that has to be damped down, sprinkle the garment with water, roll in a cloth and place in a warm oven for a few minutes, and it will be ready to iron.

Ironing Board Cover

145    Damp the material before tacking down for your fresh ironing board cover, and you will have a smooth, unwrinkled surface.

SECTION 3 SEWING SNIPPETS Buttons that Clip on

146 If you are obliged to use buttons which will not tub on a washing frock, sew one side of a patent fastener to the frock, and the other to the back of the button. Buttons can then be removed before the frock is laundered.

Children's Frocks Hint

147    When making children’s washing frocks, run a piece of material to the inside seams. If the material should fade in the washing, you will have a piece of the same shade with which to patch the garment.

148    A point often overlooked is the cutting of buttonholes on children’s clothing perpendicular. The “up-and-

down” buttonhole takes the weight better than the horizontal one.

Cutting-out Easily

149    Difficulty is often experienced in cutting materials such as georgette, silk voile, etc. quite straight. To overcome, dip the scissors in boiling water for a minute. The hot steel will cut a perfectly straight edge.

Elastic Saving

150    When putting elastic on children’s panties, sew a hook on one end and an eye on the other. Remove for washing, and the elastic will last much longer.

Glove Darning

151    A clothes peg makes a good darning base for a worn glove finger.

"Invisible" Mend

152    To mend a rent in a skirt so that it will not show, place edges together on a flat surface and then press a piece of adhesive tape over the tear on the wrong side.

Machining Heavy Materials

153    Before stitching heavy materials on the machine, rub seams with soap. The needle will slip through without breaking.

Curtains

154 When making net curtains, use the width of the net for the length of the window. Then you get the selvedge for the hem. You will find that when the curtains are washed the width of the material does not shrink nearly so much as does the length.

Loose Covers

155 When loose covers are being made, boil the piping cord before using. This prevents puckers when the cover is washed.

To Keep Needles Rustless

156    Keep needles in a glass jar, and occasionally drop in a little machine oil to keep from rusting.

Overhauling a Lace Frock

157    When a lace or flimsy dress needs mending and overhauling, slip it over a skirt board. It can simply be turned about and the weak parts detected and easily repaired.

Pattern Care

158    Use fine needles instead of pins when fastening a paper pattern on delicate material, and avoid large pin holes.

Scissor Sharpening

159    Sharpen blunt scissors by cutting through a piece of fine sandpaper several times.

Sweater Renovating

160    Holes in sweaters can be almost invisibly mended by the use of chain stitches to simulate the appearance of the knitted fabric.

161    If the sleeves of a jumper are becoming bulgy at the elbows, reverse them. Remove the sleeves, undo seams, press with a damp cloth to shrink the bulge, and replace in armholes with the left to the right. This levels up the area of wear.

Tablecloth Repairs

162    When darning a tablecloth, place a piece of net that has been put through starch over the tear. By following the network backwards and forwards, a neat darn will be effected.

Trouser Repairs

163    To give added life to trouser cuffs, sew a strip from an old kid glove inside each cuff.

164    A good emergency repair to a worn trouser pocket is adhesive tape stuck on both sides of the hole. Adhesive tape is useful, too, to replace worn shoe linings. Spread on smoothly so that it will not lump.

SECTION 4 TIPS IN GENERAL Bathroom Care

165    Line the bathroom cupboard shelves with blotting paper. It will absorb the spilt lotions or creams, and is easily renewed.

166    A sponge rubber pad is excellent for cleaning the bathroom tiles. It holds the cleaning powder, and is easy to work with. Lemon juice, turpentine or kerosene, in that order, are good for tiles. Polish off with a chamois for that extra sparkle.

167    Soap shavings mixed with kerosene will shine up the bathtub nicely.

Rusty Door Fittings

168    When door or window bolts and hinges are rusty, put a little vinegar into them.

Book Lore

169    A small lump of lime left in closed bookcases will take up damp and prevent it getting into the books.

170    A sheet of cellophane paper placed over the page of the cookery book in use will prevent greasy marks. Good for your hints book, too.

To Clean Bottles

171    Bottles should be cleaned with a solution of borax and

water to which crushed egg shells have been added. Let this mixture stand in the bottles for a day, occasionally shaking well.    • -

Bread Suggestions

172    When cutting very fresh bread, heat the knife by dipping it into hot water. The hot knife will cut slices as thinly as required.

173    Bread kept in the refrigerator will not collect mould. If well-wrapped, it will keep fresher than in the bread crock.

Brooms

174    Always hang brooms on a hook when not in use. This prolongs their life considerably. Never put brushes or brooms away damp. Damp brooms are an incentive to cockroaches.

175    If broom bristles are very crushed, soak for half an hour in a solution of loz. of alum to a quart of warm water. Cool off the mixture before putting in the broom. Hang out to dry in the open.

176    If the bristles of your broom become limp, dip in a pail of boiling soda water, and dry thoroughly in the sun.

177    A broom sprinkled occasionally with a little kerosene will pick up the dust with greater ease.

178    When straw brooms wear down too short for sweeping, cut the bristles level, glue a piece of felt or velvet over the end and you will have a good polisher for boards or linoleum.

Candle Economy

179    To make party candles last longer, try giving them a coat of white varnish. The varnish must harden for about three days before using. A charming idea for table setting is to attach candles to a deep saucer with wax, and float some small flowers round.

Carpentry Tip

180    To prevent a nail bending when driving into hard wood push it through a cake of soap before using.

Casserole Dish Cleaning

181    Never put a hot casserole dish directly into cold water. If it has to be 'oaked, begin with hot suds.

Clock Care

182    Soak a piece of cotton-wool in kerosene and put it in the clock just under the works. The oil will collect the dirt from the works.

Clothes Cleaning

183    A rubber sponge is excellent for brushing up dark clothes. A solution of borax and warm water is good for grease spots on black or navy blue; the more obstinate ones will require benzine, of course.

184    Eucalyptus oil will remove oil stains from flimsy fabrics.

Dab the oil liberally on the spot and gently rub the spot with a clean rag, working from the outside to the inside of stain so as not to leave a mark.

185    Powder marks on the necks of dark colored silk dresses will disappear if rubbed with another piece of silk.

Cocktail Table

186    An inexpensive and attractive cocktail table can be made by cutting down the legs of a small kitchen table to the required height. Enamel the top in a color to blend with your general scheme, and do the legs in a contrasting shade. An old card table will serve the same purpose, though it will not be so sturdy. Cover the worn top with a colorful wallpaper, using a blending border for the sides. When the paper has been smoothly pasted, cover with several coats of white shellac.

Removing Fish Odor from Cutlery

187    To remove odor from fish knives and forks, add a heaped teaspoonful of borax to one pint of hot water and steep the cutlery for three minutes.

Dustpan Tip

188    Rub up your dustpan with some polishing wax. The dust will slip out of the pan more easily.

Electric Stove Cleaning

189    To clean electric stoves: While still warm, place a piece of steel wool on a cloth, moisten well with household ammonia and rub the stove briskly.

Enamelled Doors

190    Finger marks on white enamelled doors and windows will soon disappear if treated with a few drops of kerosene on a rag. Wipe the paint with hot water to remove odor.

Fireplace Brightener

191 Give your brick fireplace an annual coat of raw linseed oil. This is a good preservative, and enhances the appearance.

Floor Facts

192    For unsightly cracks in floors, melt some glue in a double boiler and add to this some fine sawdust to give it body. Then color to match floorboards and fill in cracks.

193    When staining floors for polishing, use Condy’s Crystals, which make a very good stain. Then polish with nigger brown boot polish, which makes a most effective and lasting shine and does not show feet marks as floor polishes often do.

Flowers

194    Use low bowls for the “little” flowers. When taller flowers are used in low containers, use wire netting to hold them in place.

195    For “mixed bowls,“ use flowers of a light color and form at the top and outside. Darker flowers should be used at the base so that the whole arrangement appears to shade from dark to light. Stems should be cut to varying lengths.

196    Clay flowerpots may be effectively decorated with bands of crayon in gay colors without destroying the porous quality of the pot.

197    Woody stemmed flowers should be crushed, or slit well up the stem before arranging. Cut stem of roses under water, and put an aspirin in the vase.

198    Flowers will retain their freshness much longer if a lump of charcoal is dropped into the water. Particularly effective with stocks and other flowers, stems of which decay quickly. Half a cup of sugar to each quart of water is also effective in keeping blooms fresh.

199    Put a small lead weight at the bottom of vases which are inclined to be top-heavy.

Fur Cleaning

200    To clean a fur: Wipe well with a clean bath towel, then place the fur on a large piece of paper, and sprinkle generously with bran. Fold the paper over and leave for 24 hours. Take out, shake and brush well.

Furniture Cleaning

201    To preserve and clean bamboo furniture, polish it once a week with a mixture of equal parts of turpentine and linseed oil.

202    To clean deeply carved furniture, dip a clean paint brush in liquid furniture polish and apply to carving. A dry brush used immediately afterwards will remove any superfluous polish, and bring the woodwork up like new.

203    For leather furniture, put a little vinegar into warm water and wipe the leather over with a cloth dipped in the mixture. Grease stains may be removed with benzine. To renew polish on leather, mix two tablespoons of turpentine with the lightly beaten whites of two eggs. Apply with a clean cloth.

£04 For that “foggy” look on polished furniture try this: Stir together in a metal container, two-thirds of boiled linseed oil and one-third turpentine. Apply with a soft cloth, and wipe off with another clean soft cloth. Then polish well, always following the grain of the wood.

205 Methylated spirits will restore the new look to upholstered furniture. Damp a cloth with the spirits, rub thoroughly, and dry with a clean cloth.

206    To wash varnished furniture put two tablespoons of liquid furniture polish into half a gallon of warm water. Sponge furniture over, and dry with a soft cloth.

Furniture Cream

207    A good furniture cream—shred l-\ oz. beeswax and let it stand overnight in 1 breakfast cup of turpentine. Next, day, dissolve ¿oz. bland soap in £ pint of water over the fire. Allow to cool, then stir in wax and turpentine. Boil all together gently for about 2 minutes. Stir while cooking. Bottle and cork well, and leave for a few days before using. The consistency should be white and creamy. Always shake before using.

Furniture Reviver

208    Here is a first-rate furniture reviver: One pint linseed oil, i pint turpentine, i pint vinegar, i pint methylated spirits. Mix well and shake before using.

To Repair Scratches

209    Scratches on the polished surface of furniture cannot be wholly removed without entirely repolishing, but they may be camouflaged quite effectively with iodine, which is harmless to the wood. Take a small quantity of iodine on a fine brush (one from a child’s paint-box will do), and carefully paint over the scratch. Repeat if necessary when the first application is dry.

To Keep Covers in Place

210    Worn loose covers have an unpleasant habit of wrinkling untidily. To obviate this, roll some lengths of newspapers longwise, and push them well down the sides and backs of chair or couch. The covers will fit better, and remain in position.

Gas Economy

211    Place a piece of thin iron or tin across the top of your gas stove, light one jet, and you can simmer four saucepans of food at once.

Garbage Tin Freshener

212    When the kitchen tidy or garbage tin has been emptied, insert a newspaper, sprinkle with sulphur and set fire to it. Flies will not go near a garbage tin so treated.

To Separate Glasses

213    If two glasses become stuck together, the safesty way to separate them is to fill the inside glass with cold water and place both in warm water.

Handbag Renovating

214    Shabby brown leather handbags or suitcases can be brightened by scrubbing the surface with a soft nailbrush and saddle soap. Dry with a soft cloth, and polish with brown shoe polish. The same treatment is good for pigskin, but white shoe cream should be used for polishing.

Hats: To Clean and Stiffen

215    To clean a light felt hat, brush it well to remove dust, then cover with powdered magnesia mixed to a thin paste with a little cold water. Apply the paste thickly to the felt with a shaving brush. Let it remain 24 hours then brush off with a clean clothes brush.

216    To stiffen a brim, mix equal parts of liquid glue and warm water. Rub solution into hat with a piece of flannel and when nearly dry, press into the required shape.

Ice Chest Care

217    Ice chests often get a musty smell even if cleanly kept. To avoid this, place a few sprigs of fresh mint on the ice block and put a little mint in a saucer of water inside the chest. The mint has no effect on food kept in the chest.

218    Place a length of string in your ice chest drain-pipe. This will keep it free from scum, the scum collecting on the string instead of in the pipe. The string should be replaced at regular intervals. If one end of the string is weighted, it will fit easily into the pipe.

Kettle Sweetener

219    To prevent scales from hard water forming in the kettle place a clean oyster shell at the bottom.

Knife Cleaning

220    Rub a raw potato over knives which have discolored from acid.

221    A good paste for ivory or bone-handled cutlery is: A mixture of whiting and lemon juice. Apply to handles, leave on for a few minutes, then rinse and polish.

Match Saving

222    Save all the waxed paper you get. Cut into long strips and twist into spills. They are better than any other kind, burning slower and lasting longer. Keep a jam jar full of them by the gas stove and save matches.

Metal Polishing

223    For shining brass, mix flour and salt in equal parts into a smooth paste with vinegar. Apply and allow to dry. Wash in warm suds, rinse, dry and polish.

224    Remove tarnish from copper with a half-cup of salt mixed with a cup of vinegar. Add enough flour to make into a paste and brush on to bad spots. Rinse and polish. Half a lemon dipped in salt will also brighten copper. Rinse off and polish with a clean cloth. Kerosene is good for copper ornaments.

225    Clean nickel with hot suds and wipe dry. Never use an abrasive. If badly stained, polish with whiting and kerosene.

Getting Rid of Mice

226    To hunt mice out of the house, pour a little oil of peppermint about their likely haunts. To make cockroaches, silverfish and ants look for a new home, scatter Epsom Salts on the shelves of the linen press.

Polishing Mirrors

227    A very good polish for mirrors and one that will keep is made from i pint methylated spirits, i pint paraffin oil, enough shredded whiting to make a thick cream. Bottle and shake well before using.

Mixing Without Mess

228    To prevent batter from splashing when using a mixer, tie a piece of greaseproof paper round the bowl, make a hole large enough for the mixer, and there will be no splashes.

Moth Killer

229    If moth is suspected in clothing, turn out pockets, inspect behind collars and in seams for moths' eggs. Shake clothes and hang in bright sunshine, then press all over with a hot iron through a damp cloth. Eggs and grubs will be destroyed by this process.

Oilcloth Repairing

230    Oilcloth for a shelf can be joined neatly by placing the two pieces with edges touching and sticking a piece of adhesive tape on the wrong side. The join will be almost invisible and will lie perfectly flat. Excellent for tears.

Paint Tips

231    Keep paint brushes in good condition by working off superfluous paint on an old board, then soak brush as follows: If oil paint, enamel or varnish has been used, in turpentine, or benzine. If shellac, in liquid varnish remover. If lacquer, in lacquer thinner. If water paint, soak in warm water.

232    When using paint remover, apply with a brush. When the paint begins to curl, remove with a putty knife slowly and carefully.

233    Glue a piece of cardboard or a paper picnic plate to the bottom of a paint or enamel tin before commencing to paint. This will prevent drops or splashes on the floor and furniture.

Pantry Refresher

234    To impart a refreshing smell to the pantry and keep it free from flies, wipe the shelves with a cloth dipped in vinegar.

Home-Made Paste

235    A good home-made paste: Mix equal parts of gum arable and water in a tin, and place at the side of the stove to warm gradually. Stir frequently, and when quite smooth, add a little alcohol to prevent it from going sour.

Removing Stains from Paths

236    To remove oil stains from concrete paths, soak pieces of cloth in strong phenile and lay these over the dirty patches. Weigh down with a brick. After 24 hours the stain will have disappeared.

Petrol Cleaning Tip

237    When using petrol to remove stains from frocks, etc., do not put petrol directly on material. Instead, fix a piece of white cloth over the stain and apply petrol to it The petrol mark will be retained on the cloth and not on the garment.

Piano Key Whitening

238    To preserve the whiteness of piano keys, wipe with one part alcohol mixed with twelve parts of water.

Refrigerator Polish

239    Polish the exterior of the refrigerator with floor polish, preferably a liquid polish. This will keep it bright and shining.

Removing Iodine Stain From Table

240    To obliterate an iodine stain on a deal or pine table, spread on bicarbonate of soda and wet slightly. Leave to dry and then brush off.

Removing Tobacco Fumes

241    Remove stale smell of tobacco smoke from a room by putting a teaspoonful of eau-de-cologne in a tin and setting it alight.

Rubber Glove Care

242    Rubber gloves will last much longer if you paste a piece of ordinary adhesive tape over each fìnger end. Especially good for protection from long fìnger nails. Adhesive tape will also mend tears.

Rug Suggestions

243    Wipe over rugs with methylated spirits to renew brightness, and remove spots.

244    Turn your rug occasionally to save wear in one place. If rug corners curl, place a damp cloth on the offending spot and run a warm iron lightly over. Then brush tufts in the direction of the pile.

Sait Shakers

245    For filling salt and pepper containers, try the corner oi an envelope with a tiny piece cut off the tip.

246    Never put silver salt shakers away with salt in them. Salt corrodes silver.

Shoe Cleaning and Dyeing

247    Olive oil and black ink, in equal parts, will restore black suede shoes which have become shabby.

248    One teaspoon of permanganate of potash, dissolved in half a pint of hot water, and painted on white nubuck shoes will make them a lovely shade of tan. When dry, clean in the ordinary way with dark tan polish.

Silverfish Repel lent

249    Silverfish and moths loathe scented soap. Any cheap variety shredded should be sprinkled generously into the corners of drawers and upholstered furniture. Also under and around carpets to keep the pests away.

Storing and Polishing Silver

250    Table silver stored in a box of flour will not tarnish.

251    To remove tarnish from silver add a teaspoon bicarbonate of soda and a teaspoon of salt to a pint of water and stand the silver in this until tarnish has vanished. Wash in warm soapy water, rinse and dry with a soft cloth. This saves hours of polishing.

To Clean a Sink

252 If a sink has become blocked, press some chloride of lime into the vent pipe. Slowly pour in boiling water to dissolve lime, then fill sink with one inch of water. When the water begins to run away, leave tap running a few minutes.

Spider Repellent

253    If you have a room infested by spiders get some oil of pennyroyal from the chemist; saturate some pieces of cotton wool, and place near the spiders’ haunts.

Stocking Care

254    Rainy weather plays havoc with silk stockings, but if three or four drops of methylated spirits are put in the last rinsing water when washing spots will not appear.

255    If grass seeds catch on a silk stocking, wet seed and surrounding silk thoroughly. This toughens the threads and softens the hooks on seeds and with care they can be plucked off without pulling the threads.

Table Baize Tip

256 If a dish sticks to table baize, do not try to pull it off. Instead, fill the dish with hot water and leave for a minute or two. The utensil can then be lifted easily and will not leave a mark.

To Clean Teapot Spout

257 An excellent way of cleaning the spouts of teapots is to pack them tightly with damp salt and leave over night. Empty the salt in the morning and scald with boiling water.

Towel Economy

258    Make your worn bath towels into hand towels for guests, and add gay colored, washable bindings. These make excellent little “one-use” towels.

Varnishing Guide

259    When varnishing boards, always apply varnish with a well-filled brush in the same direction as the grain Smooth out across the boards, and finish with feathery strokes along the boards, as in the first application. Varnish should be warmed in a pot of warm water before being applied. Thin the first coat with turpentine, about a quarter-pint to a quart of varnish. For second or third coats, use varnish undiluted.

To Crisp Veiling

260    To restore crispness to veils, press them between sheets of waxed paper.

Venetian Blinds

261 If you are investing in Venetian blinds, wax them with floor polish when they are being installed. Dust is easier to remove in cleaning, and the polish preserves the wood.

Washing-up

262    Wash up in this order and save time and effort: Glassware, flat silver, dishes. Scrape all waste from dishes, rinse in hot water and stack in order for washing.

Window Care

263    For sparkling windows, add vinegar to water before washing. Give a final polish with a wad of newspaper

264    When windows are obstinate about raising, pour a little warm fat between the frame and the casing.

265    Clean washable window blinds by scrubbing gently with warm soapsuds. Rinse well, wipe almost dry and allow to dry completely before rolling up.

Windscreen Mixture

266    Take two tablespoons water, four tablespoons glycerine, half a teaspoon salt and mix well together. With a cheese cloth rag wipe round windscreen with mixture. It will keep rain off the glass and allow perfect vision.

To Clean Woodwork

267    Wash with the followig solution: Half cup vinegar and half cup household ammonia to two gallons of water.

To Prepare Wool for Re-knifting

268    If you find it difficult to remove the kinks in wool before re-knitting, wind it into a loose skein and drop into lukewarm water. After a minute in the water, hang it up to dry.

GUIDE TO GLAMOR AND HOME FIRST AID
BEAUTY
To Strengthen Eyes

269    Eye exercise will keep the eyes strong and bright. Tiy visualising a clock. Then turn your eyes round the face from twelve to six o’clock. Go back to one and round to seven, then back to two, and round to eight, and so on round the clock to twelve. Now do the whole thing backwards. Squeeze the eyes shut three or four times. Now blink at least fifty times. One hundred if you have time.

Cleansing the Face

270    Choose a mild, bland face soap. Harsh soaps destroy tissues. When washing the face; always work the lather upwards and outwards in a circular movement. Rinse in clear warm water, then cold. For an extra special cleansing, cover the face with a good cold cream. Then

fill the wash bowl with warm water, and scrub your face thoroughly with a face brush or washer. Rinse well in several clean warm waters. Now fill the bowl with cold water and dash liberally over your well-washed face. Dry thoroughly. A tablespoon of oatmeal added to the washing water is excellent for a dry skin. Put oatmeal in a cheesecloth bag and renew for each cleansing.

Cleansing Lotion

271    A good cleansing lotion for a day-time use is: £ oz. borax (powdered), a dram of tincture of benzoin; 4 ozs. of triple extract of orange-flower water. Dissolve in 1 pint of distilled water. The face should be wiped with clean pads of cotton-wool dipped in the lotion, and dried before applying make-up. Natural cream is one of the best of all skin-foods. Next comes lanoline, or almond or olive oils.

Two Simple Face Packs

272    No. 1: Oatmeal and almond meal, in equal parts, mixed with cold water, and spread on the face and neck, used once or twice a week, make an excellent beautifier, especially for dry skins. Leave on for about five minutes, wipe off with a damp cloth, and repeat treatment. Finally, rinse the face in warm water, and finish with a cold rinse.

No. 2: A HONEY PACK is another simple home method for skin beauty, especially good for “middle-aged” skin. Wash and steam the face, then wipe over with cotton wool dipped in cream or a little lanoline. Good quality honey should then be spread all over the face, and patted in for ten to fifteen minutes. Remove, and wash and rinse well.

Refresher

273 A wonderful tonic is a refresher with a paste made of uncooked oatmeal and almond meal mixed with a few drops of milk. Apply this paste to your thoroughly cleansed face, and in this case the cold rinse can be left until later. In fact, it is a good idea to wring towels in hot water and leave on the face for a few moments before applying the paste. Now sit with your feet up for fifteen minutes. Rinse off the paste and go ahead with your makeup.

274. If you live in a region where the water is what is called “hard/’ add a little olive oil when applying to skin.

Foot-care and Callouses

275    Treat yourself to a good pedicure by first soaking the feet in warm, soapy water. Scrub, rinse and dry. Always cut nails straight across, and file smooth with an emery board. Remove loose cuticle gently, but never cut. For callouses, soak some gauze in cuticle remover, fix with adhesive tape, and leave for five minutes. Remove the gauze, wash the foot, and rub away loosened callous. If obstinate, use pumice stone.

Corn Removing

276    Corns can be removed very easily and painlessly if a piece of lemon is squashed, placed on the corn and left overnight. Keep the lemon in place with a bandage. In the morning, remove the lemon and you will find the corn will lift out easily.

Tired Feet Reviver

277    An eau-de-cologne rub for tired feet will set them up for an evening’s dancing.

Dandruff Remedy

278    An occasional oil shampoo will keep dandruff at bay. If the scalp is dry and fine dandruff is flaking on to your collar, a weekly oil shampoo is indicated. Heat a little olive oil and, with a small sponge, or wad of cotton-wool, dab the warm oil all over the scalp, parting the hair in sections. If possible, allow the oil to remain on overnight and shampoo your hair the following morning. Diet often works wonders in eliminating dandruff. If you have been eating a lot of fatty foods, leave them off for a while and watch results. Plenty of fresh air and sunshine will also help.

Scalp Massage

279 Scalp massage is the best method of promoting hair beauty. A good surface massage can be given by a thorough combing with a blunt-toothed comb, but the most thorough way is with the hands. The thumbs should be placed behind the ears, and the scalp rotated under the finger-tips; be sure that the scalp, and not only the fingers are moving. Massage may be combined with a good lotion. Brushes and combs should be washed twice a week, and kept in a clean bag, which should be washed frequently. A final rinse in cold water for brushes will keep bristles stiff.

Shampooing

280 Shampooing needs vary with type of hair. Roughly, once a week for town dwellers and once a fortnight for the country should be enough. Greasy hair needs more frequent washing. A good shampoo consists of a tablespoon of shredded soap of good quality, melted in half-a-pint of hot water. Add a teaspoonful of pure glycerine and two teaspoonfuls of eau-de-cologne. For dry hair, a tablespoon of olive oil well mixed with the juice of one lemon and the yolk of an egg is excellent.

Avoiding "Gardener's Hands"

281. Rubber gloves should be worn for washing-up silver or brass-cleaning, and housemaid’s gloves for other tasks.

If you are a gardener, rub the hands over with lotion before attacking the garden-beds, and fill the nails with soap before putting on gardening gloves. In this way the hands will not acquire ingrained dirt.

Nail Care

282 Nails should be thoroughly manicured once a week. Wash first, and clean nails. Then soak hands in warm water in which some oatmeal has been dissolved. File nails from sides to the centre to get a good shape. An orange stick dipped in cuticle remover should remove loose cuticle, especially if care is taken after each washing to push the cuticle back gently. Rinse cuticle remover from hands, and dry well before applying polish.

Whitening the Hands

283 A lotion should be used regularly after washing the hands. Rosewater and glycerine, an old-fashioned method, is still one of the best. Lemon juice will whiten the hands and remove stains. Use lanoline, well rubbed in, at night, and wear a pair of loose gloves.

Exercise for Slimmer Hips

284 To reduce hips and abdomen, stand flat against a wall with heels together, and head and shoulders touching the wall. Draw a deep breath and stretch your arms from the front, upwards, as high as you can go. Exhale gradually, bring tensed arms down to shoulder level, and stretch towards the front. Let go what breath is left and drop your arms limply to sides. Try this exeicise gradually at first, certainly not more than 10 times, and increase each day until you can manage 50 times. Twice a day is even better, and will give wonderful results if you are persistent.

Exercise No. 2

Stand with the heels together, toes pointing out, head erect, hands placed on the flanks above the hips with fingers pointing downwards. Without moving the hands raise the legs alternately sideways as high as possible. Do not bend the knee, and straighten the foot out as the leg rises. Raise each leg 10 times. Inhale when rising, exhale when lowering each leg. By degrees it will be found possible to inhale during the raising and lowering of one leg, and to exhale during the raising and lowering of the other.

Applying Cream Rouge

285 If you find cream rouge difficult to apply, try putting a tiny piece of cold cream on the palm of the left hand and mixing the rouge with this. Apply with finger, dotting over the surface to be colored. Pat in well.

Eyebrow Trick

286 Use two eyebrow pencils—brown and black—to get that natural look. Draw the line slightly above the natural line, and brush the hairs up to meet the pencilling.

Lipstick Art

287    Two coats of lipstick, please. Blot each coat with a cleansing tissue. Use darker lipstick for the upper lip if you want a really glamorous mouth.

"Pep Cocktail"

288    When you are tired out, try this “pep” cocktail. To make, add the juice of two oranges to one egg yolk. Add a little honey for energy and shake well.

Perfume Saving

289 To conserve your precious perfume, apply with a small piece of cotton, then tuck the cotton into the clothing for a delicate, lasting fragrance.

Slimming Diet

290 There are two reasons for overweight, over-eating, or some organic disturbance. Any stringent steps to correct the latter should be under the supervision of a doctor. However, where a person is perfectly healthy, the following simple diet followed exactly, should produce a drop in weight.

On Waking: i cup of hot water or tea.

Breakfast: \ cup of tea or coffee, one tablespoon of milk, no sugar. 1 oz. toast very sparsely buttered. 1-2 oz. fish if desired Grapefruit, or an apple or an orange.

Lunch: A small portion of meat, chicken, or fish. 4-6 ozs. green vegetables (a large helping), 1 oz. toast, thinly spread with butter. Up to 1 oz. of cream cheese, if desired. 2-3 oz. stewed fruit cooked without sugar, or fresh fruit, £ cup any fluid.

Tea: 1 cup of tea, with milk only.

Dinner: £ cup of soup, meat, fish, or chicken, 4-6 ozs. green vegetables, stewed fruit, without sugar, small helping of junket or baked custard, 1 oz. toast.

This diet appears monotonous, but by variations of meats, vegetables and fruits is quite appetising. Try it for seven days, checking your weight daily.

Suntanning Lotion

291 To acquire an even tan without soreness from sunburn, mix equal parts olive oil and vinegar. Apply before going into the water the first time. The skin w7ill look pink but will not be sore. Continue until you have a nice even tan.

To Relieve Fatigue

292 A cupful of vinegar added to a hot water bath takes away stiffness after strenuous exercise, and will relieve aching and swollen feet.

To Sweeten Breath

293 Wipe the tongue several times with small pads of clean gauze dipped in lemon juice. This treatment will remove '‘tobacco breath.”

HOME FIRST AID

The ordinary accidents of kitchen and garden are usually not serious enough for medical attention. Following are a few simple methods of dealing with bites and stings, cuts, bruises, burns and scalds, but it must always be remembered that, in other than the most minor wounds, a doctor should be consulted.

Bites and Stings

294    The common blue-bag is best for bee stings, first having removed the sting itself. The same remedy for wasps. If the sting is about the throat, mouth or upper lip, the patient must be taken at once to a doctor or hospital, as these parts swell rapidly and the swelling may prove dangerous.

295    For ordinary insect bites, diluted ammonia water or a strong solution of carbonate of soda, or baking powder, dabbed on the bites at intervals or bound over them on a pad of cotton-wool will relieve the irritation. The common blue-bag, wet and held over the spot is another good domestic remedy. A cut onion will also give relief. If the skin is much irritated, try spreading calamine lotion over the affected spots, after using one of these recommended remedies.

296 Ticks must be killed before they are removed. Kerosene, turpentine or tobacco juice will kill these insects if the wound is bathed with them. The dead insect must be carefully picked out with a blunt needle which has been sterilized in a flame. Use calamine lotion to relieve irritation.

Blistered Heels

297 If you apply white of an egg to blistered heels, so troublesome to hikers, it will both quickly relieve and cure soreness.

Bruises

298 For a bad bruise, apply a piece of folded lint soaked in equal parts of methylated spirits and water, and bandage firmly. Renew this dressing every four hours. Ice is useful as it relieves pain, but does not stop bruise spreading unless applied immediately.

Bums and Scalds

299 A burn caused by dry heat, such as fire, hot metal, or electricity should be treated with strips of lint soaked in a solution of one dessertspoonful of carbonate of soda in a pint of warm water, or a one per cent, solution of picric acid. Keep the dressing moist. An oily dressing such as vaseline, or olive oil may be used if no carbonate of soda is at hand. This applies, of course, to simple burns. For more serious burns the doctor must be sent for immediately. Use the same treatment for scalds.

Cuts

300 A cut, however small, should be thoroughly cleansed before you try to stop the bleeding. The simplest way is to hold the injured part under cold running water. Broken glass, etc., should be removed if it can be seen. After washing, mild tincture of iodine should be dabbed (not rubbed) freely over the cut and surrounding skin, and a clean dry bandage put on. Sticking plaster or ointment should not be applied.

Printed by Land Newspaper Ltd., 59 Regent St., Sydney, for the Publishers, Invincible Press, Sydney.


PEANUT

BUTTER


Two full sandwiches of wholemeal bread and butter with suitable fillings, two pieces of fruit, and a half pint of milk. That’s the Oslo lunch— approved the world over as a well-balanced meal for growing kiddies. Use “El A Peanut Butter frequently as the sandwich spread and you’ll add valuable extra vitamins including Vitamin B—the nerve and body building element. Give your kiddies die benefits of this *tested and proved lunch every day.

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PEANUT BUTTER

Product of Nut Foods Pty. Ltd., Edinburgh Road, Marrickville.

* Scientific tests at Camperdown School proved that children eating this lunch regularly gained weight and were brighter in work and play than children not taking the meal.

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, NO MIXING . . . ^ \ NO MESS!

EVERYBODYS

USING THEM NOW,/


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Use the CREAMY CHEESE with zest!

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