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Its Attractions.


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A

“OCEAN HOUSE”

PORT CAMPBELL

First-class Accommodation

ELECTRIC LIGHT Mrs. A. McLaren.

Phone -22.

“KAROA”

TEA ROOMS

a, i. mckenzie

GREENGROCER, CONFECTIONER & TOBACCONIST

Phone 8.

“SEAFOAM”

PORT CAMPBELL

First-class Accommodation

ELECTRIC LIGHT D. A. & J. M. HOSE. Phone 3.

“BC7TE HOUSER

PORT CAMPBELL TEA ROOMS

CONFECTIONERY — COOL DRINKS R. J. C. & S. D. COUCH

Phone 24.

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A Brief Historical Sketch

" 7 AÜGÎ9S0

í-iBRARY

ISSUED BY THE PORT CAMPBELL PROGRESS ASSOCIATION


and . . .

II* Attraction*

AMONGST the magnificent scenery of the south-western coast of Victoria, scenery which cannot be '—surpassed for its grandeur and beauty, nestles the township of Port Campbell, where those who have had the pleasure :f visiting it, come away from this haven cf rest refreshed in body and mind, and enthusiastic as to its claim to be regarded as cne of the most beautiful and historic holiday resorts in the Commonwealth. The sandy beach fronting the open sea and skirting around the entrance to Campbell’s Creek, makes it an ideal place for children to play in safety; little wavelets caressing the leet of tiny tots, while cider children, growing bolder, venture further out to feel the fuller buffeting of the swelling waves and breakers.

In this sheltered little cove one can hardly realise that within a few minutes’ walk is the rugged coastline, with its mighty cliffs, against which the sea in its fury hurls its waves, seeking unsuccessfully to scale its heights, but delighting the onlookers with the beautiful sight of silvery spray falling back into the restless sea once more, or down amongst the tumbled rocks and crags, glistening with pebbles and ever delightful in its changing color and beauty. Against a coastline such as this, has many an ill-fated vessel been hurled to pieces, and death taken its toll, and so history is made. One, of the most historical interest, and the best known of these vessels, was the Loch Ard, which was wrecked on June 1, 1878. Only two lives were saved, and yet it is wonderful that even they were spared, for eastward and westward of the narrow gorge, which takes its name from the vessel, are nothing but precipitous cliffs, rising perpendicularly from the water to upwards of 200 feet.

On a beautiful calm day the tourist gazing over the tranquil sea could hardly credit such tales, but turning inland, the sight of the little silent cemetery speaks eloquently of the sea in its wilder moods.

Where the wreck took place there is this narrow gorge in the cliffs, opening out at the upper end into a semi-circular bay with a fine sandy beach, but for miles on cither side there is no other opening. Inside the gorge two caves were found—Tom Pearce’s Cave, which looks directly out to sea through the narrow opening, and Eva Carmichael’s Cave, which lies within a bend cf the gorge. This is an ideal spot for picnic parties, b:ing sheltered by the huge cliffs, with a fine sandy beach, but unsafe lathing water, except with very calm seas, as there is a heavy backwash.

Loch Ard Gorge.

Seme distance inland is one of Nature's wonders named the Blow Hole. While watching the sea waters gush in from the scuth side and go swirling around before they eventually escape through a natural tunnel at the northern end to a destination unknown, one can hardly realise that all this water is rushing beneath one’s feet.

For about 30 miles this coastline consists cf a rocky wall of cliffs, rising almost sheer from the sea to a height of from 120 feet to 300 feet, with intervals here and there of a strip of narrow beach or cleft gorge, where the sea has cut into a weak spot in the limestone.

Many other points of interest may be visited, such as Gibson’s Steps, Two-mile Beach, and the Deany Steps, which were opened on December 4, 1926. In great cliffs, rising to a height of 200 feet, is a small fissure in which have been cut these

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«K3»-    «■■»• 'OH»    ••

steps, 101 in number, so that from the mighty cliffs above one can descend in a few minutes to one of the best cray-fishing spots on the coastline.

To reach Port Campbell by rail the traveller needs to change at Camperdown for Timboon. From Timboon a motor 'bus conveys passengers over a recently constructed metal road through beautiful scenery to their destination. For travellers by car it is easily accessible by road from the Prince’s Highway, through Cobden; also along the metal road from Forrest, Mount Sabine. Turton’s Pass, Beech Forest, and Princetown, while a recently constructed bridge at Peterborough makes a shorter connection from Warrnambool. As. the car glides along, there is being unrolled before the tourist’s view a panorama of unsurpassed beauty, beautiful undulating country is to be seen on all sides, and passing over the little creeks and rivulets one can guess at the hidden beauty of fern and flower “born to blush unseen.”

The coastal scenery is unsurpassed in Australia, if not in the world. A well-known local lecturer describes the scenery as follows:—“Along this coastline one may see the extraordinary results wrought by equatorial currents, tidal waves, and all the battalions of the ocean’s forces, that have been charging and grinding the shore for ages. There are rocks and cliffs honeycombed, carved and moulded into a thousand fantastic shapes and figures by the action of the salt spray driven against them for centuries by the southern gales. There are islets and headlands, formed of detached rock, that have successfully withstood the ocean’s surge though terribly mauled Ly the impact. There are turrets, pinnacles, and pyramids, grim sentinels, looking down with sphinx-like serenity upon the raging waters at their base. Sometimes the outline suggests an English mediaeval castle, a German schloss, a Swiss chalet, or a grotesquely exaggerated human face. There are huge masses of rock flut/ed like an organ, domed, spired and buttressed like a cathedral, embrasured like a fort, windowed like a dwelling-house, and arched like a bridge. Then, filling in the space between these mighty wonders of the sea, we find gigantic piles of rock and sandstone, one heaped high on the other in inextricable confusion, water-worn, fissured and perforated in their unceasing conflict with the waves.” This aptly describes this magnificent coastline.

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LIST OF WRECKS

-o-

Cape Otway to Warrnambool,

1850—1914.

1850.—Sept. 16 — ENTERPRISE. schooner, supposed to be the same in which Fawkner’s party came to Melbourne in 1835.

1855.—Exact date unknown.—SCHOMBERG full rigged ship, wrecked on a reef at mouth of Curdie’s River.

1889.—Exact date unknown.—MARIE GABRIELLE, barque, wrecked off Moonlight Head.

1877.—May 28. — YOUNG AUSTRALIA schooner. 150 tons, wrecked on a reef just east of Curdie’s Inlet.

Taken from Entrance to Tunnel

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1878.—June 1.—LOCH ARD. iron clipper, 1623 tons, Captain Gibbs, master; wrecked on Mutton Bird Island, one mile east of Sherbrook River. The two survivors. Miss Carmichael (a passenger) and T. Pearce (member of the crew) were washed through the mouth of the gorge which now bears the name of the ill-fated ship. The impact of the ship upon the rocks was so violent that the deck was torn clean off the hull. When the divers examined the ship, which was located by the masts, they were surprised to find that the hull was missing. It now lies in 70 fathoms.

1878.—June—NAPIER, steamer, wrecked in Port Campbell harbor while salving the cargo of the Loch Ard.

1880.—ERIC THE RED, wrecked off Cape Otway.

1888.—January 15—EDINBURGH CASTLE,

barque. Wrecked at Warrnambool.

1891. —Sept. 6—FIJI, barque. Wrecked off Moonlight Head, within 100 yards of the position of the wreck of the Marie Gabrielle in 1869.

1892. —August 29 — NEWFIELD, barque. Wrecked about a mile east of Curdie’s Inlet.

1894.—July 22 — FREETRADER, barque. Wrecked at Warrnambool.

1905.—Nov. 12—LA BELLE, barquentine. Wrecked at Warrnambool.

1908.—Nov. 11—FALLS OF HALLADALE,    j

barque. Wrecked just west of Curdie’s    J

Inlet. The second mate of the ship (Mr. T. Griffin) made liis home at    j

Peterborough after    the    wreck. He also    i

served in the Great War, being one of the first contingent. His father, who unfortunately died    on    the voyage to    j

Australia, was. until his retirement, head master of Cheltenham College, England.    j

1914.—December (about)—ANTARES, Italian ship, wrecked about 18 miles east of Warrnambool. One of the most pathetic of all the above wrecks. The crew was washed ashore, and seeing no hope of rescue, cut crosses in the cliff. No one was saved.

Mr. A. W. Greig, Hon. Secretary of the Historical Society of Victoria, supplies the following information:—

“The name of Port Campbell appears on the map of New South Wales and Victoria, published by Arrowsmith in 1855. It is described in Bailliere’s Victorian Gazetteer from 1865 as ‘available only for boats and small wood craft.’

Reported on by Captain Payne, Chief Harbor Master. July 25. 1878. he says that at that time one vessel—the Asia. 15 tons— traded between Warrnambool and Port Campbell, taking away the produce collected at the port, which in the previous season had amounted to 300 bags, principally oats and peas.

Bailliere’s Victorian Gazetteer for 1879 gives the population as 138. No hotel, one church (for use by any denomination), and one public body—a “Selector’s Local Improvement Association” — and a harbor mostly used by wood craft.

Beacon Steps.


Mr. W. C. Till, who is at present residing at Princetown. supplies the following narrative:—

In June, 1878. about 5 o’clock in the evening, as George Ford and myself were mustering sheep on the coast about a mile west of Glenample homestead, we saw a man coming along the track from Port Campbell, and as we were travelling slowly with the sheep, the stranger soon came within speaking distance. Ford reined in his horse and said, “Hulloa, mate, what’s the matter?” Tom Pearce, who it turned cut to be. answered: ‘.There has been a tenible wreck, between two and three miles back there, and as far as I know, only one lady and myself are saved out of 52 people who were on board. Pearce, in the next breath, said: “For God’s sake can you get

The Blow Hole, Loch Ard.

seme help for the lady, as she has only one article cf clothing on, and I am afraid she will perish with the cold if left much longer.” Ford then asked him to come with him to the house to get something to eat and get some clothes, as he (Pearce) had    no boots, and    only    a guernsey    and a

pair    of trousers on.    He    had a    cut    on the

side of his head and looked as though he had lost a lot of blood. He, however, refused Ford’s offer to take him to the house, saying: ‘T will go back at once and tell    Miss Carmichael I    have    got    help,”

and, after explaining the place of the wreck as well as he could, he started to walk back, after being assured by us that we would follow as quickly as possible. We    went home as    fast    as we    could and

told Mr. Gibson, the owner of Glenample, our story. At first Mr. Gibson was inclined to be doubtful. But as soon as Mrs. Gibson heard the news she said: “Oh. don’t lose a moment. I will make up a parcel of blankets and something to eat while you are

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getting the horses. By the time we were ready to start it was getting dusk. We did not lose much time in getting to the wreck from the description Pearce gave us. Mr. Gibson, with his intimate knowledge of the ccast, was able to ride straight to the gorge. By the time we reached the scene cf the wreck it was quite dark. After securing our horses, we scrambled down the cliffs as best we could. When we got cn the beach we were met by Pearce, who was very agitated, and the first words he said were, “She’s gone, and I am afraid when she found herself alone she has done

Mr. Hugh Gibson.

away with herself somehow.” After searching the caves and amongst the piles of wreckage with no trace of her, Pearce collapsed.    Mr. Gibson covered him with a

blanket and said. “Let him rest. He is dead beat.” Mr. Gibson then turned to me and said. “You go back and get the other men on the station to come down and bring all the lanterns you can get; also bring a buggy in case we find anyone.” When I got back to the house I delivered my message, and the men—Mr. W. Robertson, of Port Campbell. Mr. W. Shields, of Prince-

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Mrs. Gibson.

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town (riding), and Mr. McKenzie, senior, of Glenample, with a boy driving a buggy, returned. By the time we arrived back at the wreck it would be about 10 o’clock p.m. Mr. Robertscn called out from the top of the cliff, and almost at the same instant Ford called out from below, “I have found her.” As Robertson scrambled down the cliff. Ford was in the act of removing Miss Carmichael from under a bush which

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Glenample Homestead.

was growing in the gorge. She was quite helpless and had to be lifted up. and was unable to speak. Soon a good fire was got going with the piles of wreckage on the beach, and Miss Carmichael soon recovered and was able to take a cup of Coffee. Pearce was then aroused and brought to the fire. and. after he was

given something us the following “The ship was 1623 tons register,


to eat, was able to tell story:—

the clipper ‘Loch Ard,’ in command of Captain

Gibbs, bound loaded with a


from Liverpool to Melbourne, cargo of general merchandise,

Mr. W. C. Till.


passengers itsxt day, passengers late supper


and had 52 souls on board all told, sixteen of whom were pasesngers. Until the ship struck the rock at the gorge they had had an uneventful voyage. The night the ship struck on the rocks the captain told the that they would be in Melbourne and to celebrate the event the and officers of the ship had a before retiring. The night was

very dark, but the ship was making good headway, with a steady westerly wind. At about 5 a.m.,” Pearce continued, “I was awakened by being thrown out of my bunk,

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and hurrying on deck I found that the ship had struck close to a high cliff, and almost immediately she began to settle down. An attempt was made to get the lifeboat out. but a hole was knocked in it. and before anything else could be done the most of us were struggling in the water. I was swept through what appeared in the darkness to be a narrow gorge, and shortly afterwards was thrown on the beach. I get out of the reach of the waves as quickly as I could. After lying on the beach for a short period day began to break, and my first thought was to see i:

Mr. R. W. Shields.

anyone else had been cast ashore, but 1 was the only one on the beach. On looking out to sea I saw someone swept through the mouth of the gorge, clinging to some woodwork, which turned out to be a hen coop. As there appeared to be a chance of the person losing a hold of the coop, I swam out to it to give what assistance I could, and found on reaching it that it was Miss. Eva Carmichael, and after a hard struggle we both reached the beach. I was not too badly off as far as clothing went, having on a pair of thick woollen trousers

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Coastal Map of Port Campbell, Showing Scenes o f Wrecks.

^ «■ O1-

»I M •.««

1— Falls of Halladale, 15/11/1908.

2— Schömberg, 27/12/1855.

3— Young Australia, 28/6/1877

4— Newfield, 29/8/1892.


5— Napier, June. 1878.

6— Hanah Thompson.

7— Loch Ard. 1/6/1878.

8— Fiji, 6/9/1891.

9—Marie Gabrielle, 1869.

10— Eric the Red, 1880.

11— Woolamai, June, 1923.

12— Spectrum.

and a guernsey: but Miss Carmichael was in a deplorable condition, having only one article of clothing on. I assisted her into the nearest cave, and left her to have another look on the beach to see if I

Tom Pearce's Cave. Loch Ard.

could be of any more assistance to anyone, but all I could see was piles of wreckage coming through the gorge, and almost the first wreckage to come ashore was a case of brandy. I was never so thankful for anything in my life when I saw what it was. I drank almost half a bottle at once, and then went as quickly as I could to the cave where Miss Carmichael was, and before I left her I made her drink the other half of the contents, and I am sure it saved her life, although it put her in a stupor from which I could not wake

Miss Carmichael’s Cave.

her. I left her to look for help. After drinking so much brandy I began to feel very drowsy, and I went to find as sheltered a spot as I could, and laid down. I must have slept for some time, for, when I awoke, I had a good look amongst the wreckage which was piled up on the beach to see if anybody had been washed

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ashore, but found no one. As the day was very cloudy, I had not much idea of the time, but it must have been well after midday when I made the attempt to climb the cliffs to see if there were any houses in

Portion of Beacon Steps.

sight. When I got to the top my heart sank, as I could not see anything that indicated any settlement. The thought of Miss Carmichael lying in that cave made me make an effort to get help, so I started to walk along the coast, but having no boots on, progress was slow. I was very thankful when I met the two young fellows —G. Ford and W. Till—driving the sheep.*’ Miss Carmichael gave a brief account of her family. She said that her father was a doctor, and was coming to the colonies with the intention of settling in Sydney.

The Arch.

The whole of the family (with the exception of one brother) had perished, and ail they possessed was lost. She spoke in glowing terms of Tom Pearce for the gallant way he had swam out to her assistance. She said: “I am sure I would not be sitting here alive if it had not been for him getting me to the shore, giving me brandy, and

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taking me into the cave out of the bitter cold.” Mr. Gibson asked her why she had left the cave.: She replied, “When I woke up I felt very confused and very sore all over, but after a while I began to recollect

London Bridge.

things very clearly, and got up to go and find Tom Pearce. When I got out of the cave I could not see him anywhere. I did not know what had become of him. Before I left England I heard so much about the wild blacks which were out here, and I thought the ship had struck against some island that was peopled with blacks, so before it got dark I went and crawled under the thickest bush I could find in the gorge. I heard something that sounded like “coo-ee,” and when I heard that strange call I thought I was amongst the blacks, and kept concealed until Mr. Ford found me.”    s

By this time Mr. Gibson had written a brief account of the wreck to be telegraphed to the authorities in Melbourne, the near-

The Twelve Apostles.

est telegraph office being Camperdown, 45 miles away. He told Ford that he would have to take the message through to Camperdown as soon as Miss Carmichael was

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got up the cliff. It was then about 2 a.m. A start was made to get Miss Carmichael up, and it was a good thing that we had two hefty men such as W. Robertson and W. Shields, otherwise she would not have

Elephant Rock, near Loch Ard Gorge.

seen the top of the cliff that morning. However, she was landed in safety. After helping her into the buggy, Mr. Gibson got in with her. There being no track, Mr. Robertson led the horse in the buggy home, arriving at Glenample House between 3 and 4 a.m., so that Miss Carmichael, from the time the ship struck until she was safe in bed again, was over 20 hours in the open. During most of that period she only had her nightdress on. Before 11 am. on Sunday the authorities had the news of the wreck in Melbourne; thanks to the hard riding of G. Ford. On Sunday we were early astir at Glenample to search

Catch of Fish, Gibson's Beach,

along the coast in the hope of finding any survivors, but no trace of anyone was fcund. During the early hours of Monday morning people began to arrive at the wreck from all parts. Among them were police and Customs officers, as the wrecked ship had carried a great amount of spirits of all kinds, from bottles to hogsheads, besides having a valuable cargo of general merchandise. Only four bodies were recovered from the wreck—Mrs. Carmichael and her daughter, and Mr. Mitchell and Mr. Jon:s. Miss Carmichael and Tom Pearce stayed at Glenample for three or four months, and then went to Melbourne, where Tom Pearce was presented with a gold m s dal and a considerable sum of money for his bravery. Pearce, at the time of the wreck, was 19 years of age; Miss Carmichael being in her 19th year also.

Disaster seemed to have followed those who bought the wreck — Messrs. Howarth, Miiler and Matthews, of Geelong. There must have been several thousand pounds worth of goods in the gorge, the wreckage being piled from between six to nine feet high, and twenty-five feet wide across the beach. The buyers got all the men they could to shift all the valuable goods above what they considered the high-water mark.

Diver Thomas Keys, who assisted in the salvage work of the Loch Ard in June, 1878.

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Then came one of those strong westerly gales, followed by very high seas, and in less than 24 hours everything of value was swept out to sea again. They had also bought a small steamer called the “Napier” to work along the coast, as there was reported to be a quantity of iron work for a bridge that was. to have been built in Melbourne. The “Napier” came from Melbourne and anchored in Port Campbell, and on two occasions visitsd the wreck. The third time she tried to get to the wreck, but. the sea getting rough, she returned to port, and in trying to turn in the bay, ran right into the cliff, and in a short time was a total wreck. Her boiler can be seen on the western side of the port bay any day at low tide.

Mr. W. V. Carmichael, a brother of Miss Carmichael, writing to Constable Hornsby from 1 Kungping Road, Shanghai, in 1908. mentioned that he came to Victoria as chief officer of the Lough Ness, of the same company, the year following the wreck. He paid a visit to the locality, and his recollections of the very rough road to the coast from Colac were still vivid. He had

The Late Mr. James Miller, who purchased the wreck of the Loch Ard.

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a driver who pulled aside for nothing smaller than a barrel, on a road that was only visible to a blacktracker. He mentioned that a watch which had been found on the body of his mother had belonged to


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The “Loch Ard,” wrecked near Port Campbell, June 1st, 1878.

his father. He added that the coffins were made from pieces of piano cases, which were washed ashore—this being of interest, as both his mother and his sister were first-class pianists. He had been to Victoria twice since the wreck, the last visit being in 1888, when he was in command of the s.s. “Era.” Prior to the wreck he was in New South Wales doing everything that came along, colonial style. He had a spell of mounted police, and was stationed at Bowenfells, Rydal, and Bathurst, after being weeded cut from escort duty in Sydney. Later he went to the backblocks and did station work, boundary riding, etc. He afterwards accepted a position as fireman cn the railways, and nine months later was driver on the western division from Penrith to Bathurst. He threew up his position to go home in order to induce his father to


Graves in Loch Ard Cemetery.


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come out. but in the meantime his father was already on his way out. He was also an instructor and major of mounted police in Mexico during the big revolution.


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WRECK OF THE LOCH ARD

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interesting Letters

The Graves and the Victims

In connection with the wreck of the Loch Ard. near Port Campbell, some years ago the late Mr. Hennessy, secretary of the Port Campbell Progress Association, received the following letter from the brother of Miss Carmichael, Mr W. V. Carmichael.

Miss Carmichael was rescued from the wreck in a most miraculous manner.

Mr. Hennessy had written to Mr. Carmichael in regard to keeping the graves of the victims, who were interred in the Loch Ard Cemetery, in good order. The letter speaks for itself, and needs no comment.

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25 Hunghing Road.

Shanghai. Nov. 14, 1913.

John Hennessy Esq.,

Hon. Sec., Progress Association,

Pert Campbell.

Dear Sir,—I was very glad to get your letter of the 5th October, as I have often thought of the neglected graves and the monument you speak of, but could not think cf any chance of having it attended to, otherwise by going there and doing it myself, which, under present conditions, is impossible. Your association has my full permission to do as you think best, and if there are any charges, please let me know and I will remit. Thank your association for what I value very much as a piece of genuine Christian kindness. I am sure all our family will be deeply grateful to you. I wish you all possible good things during the coming year. 1914. Believe me, always,

Yours gratefully,

W. V. CARMICHAEL.

K<«


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Tom Pearce was the son of Captain Pearce, the commander of the ill-fated ship Gothenburg, and who. like Captain Gibbs of the Lech Ard. went down with his ship “like a sailor.” Tom was 19 years of age when the catastrophe of the Loch Ard occurred. He was born in Melbourne, and was a midshipman of the Loch Ard. At the inquiry held into the cause of the wreck. Tom Pearces evidence was very clear and given in a thoroughly seamanlike manner. A meeting of Victorian natives was held at

Mr. Tom Pearce.

Warrnambool to present him with a testimonial. The sum of between £70 and £100 was collected, which was expended on a complete outfit for him. and also some pocket money. A gold watch and chain, valued at 60 guineas, was presented to him by His Excellency the Governor on behalf

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of the inhabitants of Victoria. He was subsequently presented with the Royal Humane Society’s medal.

Tom Pearce married    the sister of

Robert Strasenburg, apprentice on the Loch Ard. who lost his life when the vessel was wrecked. At the time of his death in 1908 he was captain of the R.M.S.P. Trent. His son, Tom Pearce junior, lost his life on the Loch Venacher, and his only surviving son, Robert, D.S.C., who served many years in the Loch line, became third officer of the T.S.S. Hobson’s Bay.

Miss Carmichael.

Miss Carmichael (now Mrs. Townsend) is living in Bedford, England. Her husband is deceased, and her three sons are married. Miss Osborne, of Princetown, while on a visit to England, paid Mrs. Townsend a visit. Miss Osborne was made very welcome, as her mother was a special friend during Mrs. Townsend’s stay at Glen-ample after the wreck.

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Mrs. Carmichael’s Grave, Loch Ard.


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General Store and Bakery i

PORT CAMPBELL

Phone 1.

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H. H.WIGGINS    \

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PORT CAMPBELL . SERVICE STATION

PETROL — OIL — ACCESSORIES — CARS AND BUSES FOR HIRE —

Phone 12.

Port Campbell Hotel

New Building. All Modern Conveniences. HOT & COLD WATER Sewered &c. Excellent Cuisine.

J. SLEVIN, Licensee. Phone 4.

P. Jennings

PORT CAMPBELL

Blacksmith and Undertaker

ALL GENERAL REPAIRS THONE 26.

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