( i-jcxH SUGGESTIONS

Emphasis is placed on the value of the power of thought being the child's possession through the spirit of co-operation between Teacher and Child, together with the right use of subjects, illustrations, and review lists.

A suggestion is put forth that supplementary Reading, Language Work, and Spelling be gained by the use of the I1B. ; and by children's composition (oral and written):—

A.

To educate broaden the point of view and give a sense of proportion.

1.

2.

From related subjects used correlatively.

By visualizing the illustrations of the book itself, and supplementary pictures.

To aid in the overcoming of difficulties and to give power of attack in order to gain facility and expression.

3.

4.

From review lists, dictionary lists, children’s own lists, and teacher's listed difficulties.

From the combination of words and phrases, and word-hunting.

...... —<»r-

B.

To form the habit of seif dependence.

Through silent reading, dramatization, discovery of difficulties.

c.

To co-ordinate the tactual and muscular

forces.

Through writing, composition, dictation, drawing, and hobby work.

D.

1.

A few minutes review daily on the listed difficulties.

For efiicicncv in spelling and enunciation.

2.

A short daily review on type words to gain power over the vowels and consonants. (Ear-training).

Por control of utterance.

3.

Short, quick exercises after review, to give confidence and power of attack. (Eyetraining).

• •

The interpretation of literature must not be overshadowed by drills, nor spelling of excerpts be enforced.

Vocal conservation has its place.

First

Infant Reader

By E. PYE

Author of “ First Steps at School,” and “The Federal Primer.”

“ We should maKe the same use of a booK that a bee does of a flower. He gathers sweets from it but does not injure it.”

Colton.

GEORGE ROBERTSON & COMPANY PROPY. LI

MELBOURNE, SYDNEY, ADELAIDE AND BRISBANE.

PR KFACE

THE aim of the Federal Readers is to bring into harmonious relationship all who worK with them.    The booKs are designed

so that individual power and correct oral interpretation may be the possession of the children through thought, dramatic insight, ear-training, and control of the organs of speech.

Simple expression has been sought for so that mechanical difficulties may not be obstructive, a strong endeavour being made to Keep the language simple enough to meet the vocabulary of the children and also- to enlarge the same.

Continuity of thought is gained through the subjects being (1) Seasonal, (2) touching Home and Social Activities within the comprehension of the children, thus forming association linKs w hich will satisfy, give added power, and through co-operation lead out to the great wonderland.

To Nature the all-bountiful is given pride of place.

The relrted subjects-Nature Study. Oral and Written Composition, Spelling, Transcription, Writing, Dictation—are allied to speaKing and reading, and have all had consideration.

The association linKs with regard to grading subserve future teaching.

The importance of memorizing excerpts, and the introduction to the dictionary habit have been Kept in view.

Power of appreciation, love of literature, the self-dependence of the child, good fellowship and public spirit are the ultimate aim.

Humor and the happy smile have been made welcome.

FEDERAL READER FART I.


CONTEXTS.


January to June with Seasons, Special Days and Times Noted.


Summer Season

^ Season of Light f - Season of Heat i Season of Effort '


Signs of Autumn


Autumn Season 22nd March

(Season of Change)


Signs of Winter


Winter Season 21st June


January

Holiday Time 1st. New Years Day 26th. A.N.A. Day—Australia’s Birthday Home Friends

February

14th. St. Valentine’s Day Farm Friends

Migrants begin to leave

March

Thank-You Month 1st. St. David’s Day (Welsh) 17th. St. Patrick's Day (Irish) Autumn Time

Easter Tide


April


May


Children’s Gardens 19th. Discovery Day 21st. Froebel’s Birthday

• Children’s Friend)

23rd. St. George’s Day (English)


Empire Month 1st. May Day 24th. Empire Day


Arbor Time


3rd. King’s Birthday 21st. Shortest Day


From june to December, see Federal Reader Part II.


Recapitulatory Words from    Primer, to

give Power and Control over the

1. Short sounds of vowels , a —-|    *> oj t

2. Final consonants

•5. Initial consonants    ^ utterance.

</) .=

Phono

grams.

Phonograms must be pronounced as wholes at this stage, i.e.: - at, not a t.

“at” should call up bat, cat, fat, etc.

final

Conso

nants.

a

at

bat, cat, fat, hat mat, rat.

t

ap

cap, lap, map, rap, sap, tap.

1>

am

dam, ham, jam.

111

an

can, Dan, fan, man, ran, van.

11

ack

back, «Jack, pack, quack, sack.

ek

ag

bag, rag, tag.

ad

bad, had, lad, mad, sad.

d

ab

cab, tab.

h

e

et

get, let, met, net, yet, wet.

t

ep

rep.

p

em

hem.

m

en

Ben, den, lien, men, pen.

n

eck

deck, neck.

ck

ell

bell, fell, tell, sell, well.

ii

eg

beg, leg, peg.

g

ed

bed, led, red, Ted.

d

el)

web.

I*

Initial

Consonants.

(b)

bag

beg

big

bog

bug

(d)

damp

den

did

doll

dull

(g)

get

got

gum

(j)

jam

jet

jig

jog

jug


(c)

cat

cock (f)

fat

fen

fish

fag

fun (h)

ham

hem

him

hot

hum (k)

kid

Phonograms must be pronounced as wholes at this

S ^

11

II

stage, i.e.: —it, not i-t.

.r o

«/} £

¿1. 34

“ it ” should call up bit, fit, lit, etc.

— C

1

it

bit, lit, hit. lit, pit. sit. wit.

t

i|>

hip, lip. nip, pip, sip, tip.

p

illl

him, dim.

in

in

fin. pin. tin, win.

ii

ick

Dick, kick, lick, pick, quick.

ck

ill

ilk hill, fill, hill, mill, will.

11

i il

big, <1>S> 1>'S, ns, .PS, wig.

or

Ö

id

bill, did, hid, lid, rid.

d

il)

bib, nib, rib.

b

o

<)t

cot. dot, got, hot, lot, not, pot.

t

op

hop, mop. pop, sop, top, shop.

P

Olii

Tom, from.

111

on

on, don, np-on.

11

ock

lock, rock, sock.

ck

oil

doll, Poll.

11

OS

bos, dos, tbs, j°S, lug.

or

o

od

nod, pod, i*od, God.

d

()l)

mob, rob.

b

11

ut

but, cut, but, nut, rut.

t

up

cup, pup, sup.

p

mu

Sum, hum, sum.

111

nn

him, fun, run, sun.

11

tick

luck, duck, suck, tuck.

ck

till

dull.

11

US

bug, dug, pug, tug.

tr

i »

11(1

bud, cud, mud.

111)

cub, rub, tub.

b

Initial

Consonants.

(ill)

mad

mend

milk

mop

must

(ll)

nap

nip

not

nut

(|>)

pat

pet

pit

pot

pup

quack

quick


land

let

lit

lot

luck


rat

rest

rich

rock

rush


(s)

sat

set

sit

sop

sup


(t)

tap

ten

tin

top

tug


(V)

van


(\v)

well

will


(tin )


(z)


zig

zag


r


heart,

my country !

Dorothea Mackellar


Core of niv

f


%


&


u Sing a Song of Seasons, Something bright in all, Flowers in the Summer, Fires in the Fall.’’

Summer Time

Season of Light.

Season of Heat.

Season of .) ov.

Light T

ime.

4.

Hot l)avs.

Bright r.

rime.

5.

Long Dav: €/

11arvest

Time.

(i.

1 iolidaySo

V

" Sing ! Sing! The birds are awake with the morn,

The golden-haired Day-King is born, ,

Hail to the King!"

bright mil! lit

air

horn

sea

hair

corn

sea son

fair

morn

heat


light

night

hoi i dav liar vest

'* Fse Time well, and you w ill get from his handN more than he will take from yours.”

Summer


rii • %

I ime.


The New Year.


NEW


Flowers die:

Xew days, New wavs Pass l>v : Love stays.


come to us again.


1.—January 1st brings Father Time’s -.—‘'Old Father Time stands still for


birthday.

none.”


a.

4.


»).


January brings the New Year. The New Year creeps in quietly. It comes to greet all with


U


1 Happy S Year.


" King in the new,

• • • • • •

liillg ill the true/" Tennyson.


year

near

bird

birth day

true

truth

<|ui et, qui et ly.

one, none.

a gain

glad

a wake

come, some.


WHAT THE NEW YEAR BRINGS TO THE CHILDREN

AND TEACHERS.

The New Year brings ns—

1.    New Davs. 3. New Faces. Ò. Kindly Meetings.

2.    New Wavs. 4. New Places. (>. Kindly Greetings.

Country children going to school. v

12 Months of the Year.


1.-

d a.nnary.

t/

9

February.

«/

3.

—March.

4.

April.

5.-

May.

().

d tine.

r—

t -

-d 111 V.

8.

A ngust.

1).

September.

10.

( )ctober.

11.

-November.

12.

December


After school in town.


7 Days of the Week.

1. —Sunday.

2. —Monday.

3. —Tuesday.

4. —Wednesday.

a.—Thursday.

(>.—Friday.

*

7.—-Saturday.

t

(Days of week, and months of year will be taken as they come with the calendar)

The good old Year is with the past,

Oh, be the New as kind !

IV. C. Bryant.

fa ees


phi cos


kind Iv

fy


If the (¡rum Tree could speak!

He would sav:

“Heigh-ho! A.X.A. day! 26th of January!

Here are the children again! This is Australia's Birthday. It is tin* children's holiday. Here tliev are. They have come to plav under the shade of mv branches."

Bring the hoop and bring the ball, Come with happy faces all,

Let us make a merry ring,

Talk and laugh and dance and sing.

could

should

branch es

would

they

«/

chil dren

The Australian Flag lias a word ot good cheer for everyone.

The red savs: ’Be brave!"

tJ

The white says: ” Be pure ! ”

The blue savs: u Be true!"

She is a rich and rare land;

O! she’s a fresh and fair land She is a dear and rare land This native land of mine.

Thomas Davis.

Long may our land be bright With Freedom’s holy light.

There is nothing so kingly as kindness, There is nothing so royal as truth.

When God looks down on Australia,

He looks down on the best

Of the good, vast lands, stretched

’neath His hands.

Lorna Morres.

“Or R FLAG.”

THE AUSTRALIAN FLAG.


In one of our town schools the little nihlreii

were asked what the    re

on their flag stood for.

One little hoy said, “ For war,” a little girl said.

“ For danger,” and Hack, in a quiet voice, said, " I think red stands for life.” one- won- early. u I think so too,” added the teacher. Life means u He brave.” They all knew the white flag of Peace. When the meaning of blue was asked for, a big voice said, “True Blue!” If that is not the meaning, can you tell what is?

The children knew' the Southern Cross. They had been looking at the sky the evening before. That day one of the classes had won the last flag for the month. All the children had had a hard tight to be “early to school” every day.

47    t/    t

The teacher said, “ Your faces are easy to read

t-'

this morning. I feel you have something good to tell me. Oh ! have we won the last flag? Well! that is tine! we may not always be able

to do as well, but we can try.”

12

Review words; long sound of the vowels for B.B. Reading, Spelling, Composition (oral and written).

For Repetition


Recognition

Visualization. Ear Training.

Reproduction

Articulation.

Enunciation. Pronunciation.

Long

Vowel.

Pnono-

grams.

final “e” makes the short sound of the vowel long.

Exceptions.

a

ace

lace, place, race, face.

;ule

made, fade, spade, shade.

age

wage, cage, ape, cape, tape.

ake

bake, make, rake, take.

ale

sale, tale. ate, gate, late.

aine

lame, name, tame.

ave

gave, brave, save, slave.

have.

e

e te

Pete.

l

ice

ice, nice.

ide

ride, side, wide, inside.

ike

like, alike, strike, ime, time.

ile

mile, smile, while.

ine

fine, mine, ite, quite, white.

ipc

ripe, pipe. ive, live, alive.

live, give.

o

ode

rode. ose, nose, rose.

love.

oke

broke, smoke, poke, woke.

move.

ole

pole, hole, stole, ome, home.

some, come.

ope

hope, rope, one, alone, stone.

one, done.

u

ube

tube, cube, use, used, useful.

rude.

mie

tune, uce, puce, lire, pure.

rule.

For the Teacher. Repetition is taken to mean review, or natural and varied forms of presentation. See suggestions.

mat,

mate.

play mate.

pet.

Pete,

car pet.

pin,

pine,

pin a fore.

hop,

hope,

hoped.

us,

use,

use ful.


crv

t

t ry

«.

cry in#

try ing

cried

t ried

spy

spied

hear

heard


Little Pete—I.

Little Pete was the pet of the house. Did you see him in the ring ? He is the tiny boy. -Just near Pete's home a big pine tree grew. The pine tree gave such a fine shade that, on hot days, Pete and his mate »Jack played under it. The pins and needles of the pines made a fíne carpet for the

playmates.

inmself.

Sometimes

Pete had

to play

1)V

t/

tiny

ۥ

nee dies

played

him si

df

One day he stood upon a box, and, with a jump, he

f

/

Cones and Needles.


sprang on to a branch of the pine tree. "How fine it is up here ! I wish I were a little bird,” said Pete, " I'd fly to the top of the tree and look round the world. 1 wonder if it is of any use to try?” Pete put his hand on the next branch, drew himself up, and Hey Presto! he was there.

14

von

t

here

one

some

an y

your

there

won der

some t hues

man y

Little Pete—II.

Wry soon Pete began to feel too far from the ground. lie shouted out, but nobody was near. His brother and sister were both away from home, and that day «Jack had not come to play. Pete saw that crying was of no use. So lie tried to slide down. He bad just set his foot on the next, branch when, looking round, lie spied his mother near.

She heard a tiny voice sav, u Where's vour little Pete, mother?'1 She soon found him, and said, " Let me help you down, Pete. We must hurry home, or Hetty and Fred will be there Indore us." "Hurrah! Hurrah!1’ said Pete, and oft* he wont with a hop, step and a jump. “Let me open the gate. I can lift the chain. Hurrah! Hurrah!"

to

call

look

sav

o

was

too

call ing

look ing

sav iiifi

t.

wore

t wo

called

looked

said

where

TH.K CHILDREXS HOM K-COM INO.

Coo-ee! Coo-ee! He re we are liome again. How are vou, Mother? How are voli, little Rete? We ha ve come sudi a long wav. We are glad to he witli voli all again. I nde drove us to thè traili. We had bis fine pair of horses.

'The harvest was over wlien we left. Harvest time was a Imsy time. The air was so hot, hut we were too busv to think of that. It was

e-

sudi fini tossing thè hay. I nde gave us a rake and a fork, and we helped to make thè big haystack. In tilt1 eveuing we play ed ganies. We bave had a fine holiday, hut it is good to he honie again !

“ Make thè home-eoniing sweet."

min

air

or

o ver

one

traili

Itili r

for

do ver

(Ione

^rain

fair

fork

Rov er

come

(Irai il

pair

Oli

cov er

coni illg

diain

chair

forni

o peli

gone

a gain

want

song

se cret

liome

A very long time ago there lived a mail called \ alentine. \ alentine loved little children, and they loved him. Tliev came from far and near to see him.

When he was very old he said, ’ Tell the

children 1 cannot see them now, hilt if they will

/ 1

write to me, I will read their letters, then burn them, and the smoke will carry the answers back."

"When Valentine, the child-lover, died, it became the custom among the children to send tokens of love to each other on his birthday, the 14th of February.

That day we now call St. Valentine’s Day.

1 i ve< 1

cliil dren

an swers

loved

let ters

died

write

car rv •/

cus tom

Haymaking (grass

This is the way we make our hay : Men cut the grass, then lad and lass We take it, and shake it, and rake it Then into heaps we place it.

And lease it to the sun to bake it;

'

w.

</;Make hay while the sun shines.”

And when it is brown we pull it down,

And again wo take it and shake it,

And again with our rakes we rake it;

And when we have done, with dance and fun, Home in our carts we take it,    P. Graves.

mill

blue

bake

read v •

mill er

bl e w

bak er

health v •

Hour

live

bak er's

wealth y

How er

lived

bus y

ear lv

.)<>• ly

mas ter

re mem ber

\N iS(l

T11 L

MILLER.

There was a jolly Miller,

And lie lived l>v himself;

t

As the wheels went round They brought him wealth.

Nursery Rhyme.

I am a jolly miller, and 1 live by myself. 1 shall have a lmsv time with mv men now. The

€'    „    t

corn is ready to be made into Hour. We must awake with the sun.

” Earlv to bed, and earlv to rise,

f    7    t

Makes a man healthv, wealthv and wise.”

• / «/

The miller lie grinds his corn,

The miller he grinds his corn, his corn,

The Little Boy Blue comes winding his horn,

With a hop. step, and a jump.

Nursery Rhyme. - ^

Little Bov Blue. The Miller. The Baker.

Do you remember Little Boy Blue? Little Boy Blue minds the slieep and the corn? Little Boy Blue! Ah! What did he do? The Haystack can tell you.

Bat-a-cake, 1 hit-a-eake,

Baker's man !

Baker’s man! did you make the cake for us?

e/

Did you make it with the Hour the jolly miller ground? Little Boy Blue’s master sold the corn to the miller. The sheep and the cows were in the corn. They were not there long. Little Boy Blue blew his horn.

re mem her

which

with

our

blew

blue

wheel

what

ground

vom*

f

Blossom, Bess, and Clover.

Come up, Blossom! Come up, ('lover!

And Bess with the swishing tail !

Chase them, Hover! See how they loiter Home to the milking pail.

Rhyme.

Come, Bess! Come, Blossom! Come, Clover! W e want your milk to-day. W e want to set it for cream to make butter. Hut your head in the bail! Bess! Please do not swish your tail. Mow, Blossom ! it is your turn. W e want plenty of milk to send away. Little pigs say, ‘AVe want some too. W e will follow the pail.”

cream

put

fol low

swish

want

head

please

turn

plen ty

lit tie

Did you gef into the coni, good cows ? The master found you just in time. Come, Clover, you are next. You did not hurry, did you? Now, good Clover, mind the rail, or a splinter might catch vour tail.

A pint of milk if you please for Rover,

Some hay for Blossom, and Bess, and Clover.

Rover rounding up Sheep.

1 one

back

>»p

each

('on er

once

»1 <IC lv

ll|) Oil

peach

eov ered

lmr ry

sack

un der

teach

work

chat

black

on

•teach er

worked

clmt ter

tack

in

oth er

what

scat tei*

stack

o ver

an oth er

with

Two pints^one quart. 2 pints=l quart»

22

The

Havstack.

t-

1 am just

the

Havstack. 1 «

give

food to

Blossom, and

Bess.

and Clover.

The

children


play games on me, under me, over me.

Shall 1 tell you a story ?

« »

The Haystack's Stow.

L

Once upon a time, hundreds of little seeds filled a big sack in the barn. One day Farmer Brown came and took

the seeds a wav to the

(

paddock to scatter on the sweet soil. Swing! went the farmer's arms, and his feet kept time too. I p and down the paddock—to and fro—till all the ground was covered, till all the seed was sown.

11.

Then Farmer Brown came with a very big rake called a harrow. The horses helped to draw it, and very soon the seeds were under the «round. There they lay quiet for a time. The wonder of life w as in each seed, and one by one they began to grow. Push! Down went the little roots! Push! V|> went the little shoots! The sun's rays helped. The dew and the rain helped. Everything worked without any noise and without any grumbling.

TIL

At last the shoots grew' up. They grew quite tall, and on each shoot was a fine head of grain. When the wind came, they began to nod, and dance, and sing. Farmer Brown watched and w aited. One day he said, ” What fine nodding heads and lovely green dresses you have! 1 must cut some of you for the new' haystack."

IV.

Next dav, Farmer Brown and his men came to

r 7

reap the crop, and before long it was cut down and bound into sheaves. These sheaves were made into stooks, and for a time the stooks stood in the sun. They were then tossed into the dray, and taken away to be made into a haystack.

Some of the crop was left to ripen, so that there would he golden grain to grind into Hour.

tru ly

rays

won

grum bling

tak (ui

qui et

sheaves

won der

wait ed

gold ('ii

quite

wheat

nod ding

love ly

f/

rip en

Back of the loaf is tlx* snowy flour, And back of the flour is the mill, Back of the mill is the wheat and the shower.

And the sun, and the Father1?, will.

[ till

un til

skill

ski! ful

1st March. St. David’s Day.

(Welsh)


«/

St. David, the noble saint of W ales, was a brave man. At one time, when in the service ot the King, he met grave trouble. "On! on! 1 will not turn back!" said he. "I will not disgrace my rank, I must keep my promise or die ! The story tells us that St. David would have lost his life, but, happily, St. George of England came just in time to help him. lie gave St. David the Magic Sword, and St. David won the tight, and so was able to keep his word.

St. David was called the Black Knight.

The emblem of the Welsh is the Leek.

saint

her

word

night

Imp py

paint

ser vice

sword

knight

hap pi ly

.....but still bear up

And steer Jli/j/it Onward.'''

Milton.

I lie Season of Travel

for the Birds.


THL WIND'S M L SS AGL.

Then to the birds in their nests lie went; “Autumn to you ;i message has sent ; l>e ready to start as 1 pass by.

For up to the North is a long way to fiy.

Why tarry we longer,

Now Summer is done?Mrs.

As the bird wings and sings.

Let us cry “All good things

Are Olirsf , . .    —Browning.

come back


There are days when the birds A very few—a bird or two,

To take one backward look.

A. B. P

About this time of the year some birds go North. They do not bid us “Good-bye.” The message comes and away they go! Another message will tell them when to come back to

Australia. Will von watch for the birds'

€/

return ?

Far to the Northward there lies a land.

A wonderful land that the winds blow over.

And up in the heavens the brown lark sink's The songs that the strange wild land has taught her ;

Full of thanksgiving her sweet song rings

A. B. Paterson.

Pan, the Piper.

" Who'll dance to my piping, my piping, my piping i

Who'll dance to my piping?" the wind sang one dav.

t.

pipe," cried the grass the wind rushed awav.


" Oh ! I'll dance to vonr in the paddock,

So it rippled and ran till

17th March. St. Patrick’s Day. (Irish.)

The Cross of “ ST. PATRICK” for Ireland.


St. Patrick was the true knight of Ireland. When he set out to do brave deeds, a bright star was his guide. As he rode along one day he heard cries of distress, from some maidens, so he pushed on quickly. Coming near, he called out, "Do not fear, I will give you help. St. Patrick did not rest till the maidens who were in trouble were

safe. St. Patrick was called the Green Knight.

#

The flag of St. Patrick is a Red cross on a white ground. The narrow red lines are drawn from corner to corner like the cross of St. Andrew, but the colors differ.

The emblem of the Irish is the Shamrock.

star

ride

dis tress

on ward

nar row

guide

rid ing

*

maid ens

for ward

col ors

" He was true to the word of a Knight."

For J*( petition, ]\<co<jn it ion, Jieprod notion. Comparison of Vowel sounds with the same symbol.

1 an

' at a

1

fan, fancy, and, hand, an. tliank, plank, cat, catch, chat, chatter, scatter, apple, happy, perhaps, happily.

! ack

sack, stack, hack, black, packet.

ail

nail, snail, rail, railway, sail, sailor.

| ain

rain, train, pain, paint, brain.

a v a \

rav, drav, alwavs, holiday.

j ea

great-, break, steak.

ev

tj

they, grey. eigli, eight (8).

\ air

a ' ear \ are

pair, fair, chair, hair.

bear, pear, teai*. fear, *tear.

bare, care, dare, rare.

a ) a r

are, arm, star, harm, carpenter.

a ) a s t

fast, faster, last, grass.

(al

call, called, calling, also, always.

1 an

Maud, cause, because, caught, taught.

<l j aw 1 alk

saw, raw, draw, straw, talk, walk, walked, walking.

1 ev

ever, never, every, everywhere.

e \ en

fence, pence, silence.

( ea

head, feather, weather, health.

I ee e

{ ea

seed, teeth, indeed, between, sheep, easy, East, teach, teacher, peace.

op

hop, hopped, hopping, stop, stopping.

()

0111

from, Tom.

‘ ong

long, strong, stronger.

()

over, Hover, clover. ‘cover.

oe

toe, foe, hoe.

o

oa

boat, throat, float, road.

| oik

folk, yolk. old, told, sold.

V OW

grow, throw, know, show.

11

lip

upon, cup, butter-cup, tub.

u

use

excuse. tune. cube, tube. duty.

ll

ule

rule. tide, rude. true, truth.

11

lit

put. ttsb, push. fill, joyful.

11

111*

fur, turn, return, curly, burn.

oo

00 u u

01

ov

#

Oil

ow

i


iil

in

in

it


mg


ite

ide

¡C


will, skill, till. il, skilful, until, in, since, milice, quince, inch, inches, ink, drink, think. ing, finger, thing, little, splitter. ick, prick. iv, river.

quite, mite, ■while. ire, fire, tired, side, beside, guide. ipe, ripe, ripen, cries, cried, tries. v=i, skv, tiv.

__ t    ♦    _


food, spoon, loose, tooth, coo-ee, cockatoo, foot, look, looking, good, wood, wool, few, dew, new, knew, blue, blew, juice, fruit, rude, rule, true, oil, spoil, loiter, point, noise, voice, boy, loyal, royal, enjoy, joyful, about, aloud, cloud, mouth, house, found. cow, bow-wow, fowl, down, now._

Season of Change.

Autumn Time.


BIRDS.

The wild birds are dying In silence to rest.

l.

3.

5.


L HAVES.

Green leaves.

2.

Red leaves.

Brown leaves.

4.

Yellow leaves.

#

Flat leaves.

(5.

Curlv leaves.

V

SEEDS.


1. Big seeds.

3. Long seeds d. Round seeds. 7. Hard seeds.


2. Little seeds.

4. Short see ds.

0. Oval seeds. 8. Soft seeds.


y r i

1. Red fruit.

3. Ripe fruit.

5. Good fruit.


ITS.

2. Yellow fruit.

4. Fresh fruit. (I. Clean fruit.


Oh ! ye strange wild birds, will ye bear a greeting

To the folk that live in that western land ?


Fot so fail* was the earth in the golden Autumn. \Ve sought no farther for Fairy-land.

—Anne Glenny Wilson.

I Have a Garden of Mv Own


i


have a garden ot* my own Shining with flowers of every loied it dearlv while alone, But 1 shall love it more with


hue;


von.

«


For flowers that bloom about our feet For tender grass, so fresh, so sweet; For song of bird and bum of bee;

For all things fair we bear or see Father in heaven, we thank Thee!

A Thank-You Day.

Apples red, and apples yellow, Apples juicy, apples mellow, Peaches, grapes, all fruits so sweet Smiles for all we chance to meet ; Time for helping, time for play, These make up a Thank-you Day.

All things bright and beautiful, All creatures great and small, All things wise and wonderful, The Lord God made them all. Each little dower that opens, Each little bird that sings, lie made their glowing colors, He made their tiny wings.

35

Fred returns from a Ion«* visit

O

to Ills Aunt.

Time passed, and Autumn came to fold Green Summer in lier brown and gold.

Whither,

It is fine to be back again. Hetty and T are glad to be together. In Spring, Hetty will tell you about her garden. Mine is next to it. Hy garden is big. The cherry-tree and the fine old apple-tree are in my garden. The cherries are all gone, but there are plenty of ripe apples now.

Mark! Hetty is calling ! what is she saying ? " Here is a lovely red and yellow leaf. Here are lovely brown ones too. They are thing everywhere. Some are off and away' like the birds.

t

The wind must be saying

‘Now for a frolic ! Now for a leap!”'

rhanks

îs

Tlninks li viner.

For ail to l)e seen ls the leaves falling Falliiiii ! Fallingl

What a change there is sinct 1 was liere ! lt was \\ inter tiim tlien, a resting-time forthetrees. Novv it is seed-time and leaftime and a very, very good time In sonie parts of Anstralia tlie\ call it Thanksgiving Time.

Kaster-Tide.

() birds on the wing, Pray tarn, and sing

«-■    «.7    ~

A sweet roundelay,

J

is near.


For this beautiful day, For Easter, glad Easter,

The Luster-egg

White

and the Little Hare.

No one quite knows why the Little "White Hare is said to bring Easter Eggs. Perhaps it is because Easter eggs are found very early in the morning, and we know Little White Hare moves about at night like Santa Clans.

Little White Hare will not put his eggs into stockings as Santa Claus likes to do, he puts them in most out-of-the-way places. And so an egg hunt is a happy time in Kindergarten. It keeps every-one busy and happy.

I 1j < l S ti

hap py

be cause

bus v ♦

Eas ter

per haps

San ta Claus

a bout

branch

crac k

drv

t.

fresh

grass

brown

creek

drain

fruit

green

hro ken

croak

drink

frock

grow

break

croak ing

draw

frog

grew

brain

crawl

drench

frown

ground


In rose-time or in hern«

Any fresh fruit to-day?


time,

When ripe seeds fall or buds peep out,

W hen green the grass or uhite the rime,

There's something to be glad about !

Fresh fruit to-dav!    11

»    t

is good and ripe. Mind

vom* frock, the fruit will •

stain it. Do von hear the rain? The frogs are croaking, the land is soaking. The creek is full and so are the drains. The grass is dry and brown, but green grass will soon grow again. The cows and sheep are glad. The farmer will be glad. 1

1~X    • j ^    • •    I    ••    C    • c    |

-or its mining! mining! mining:

How the iron root- tops ring!

How the waters swiftly draining

Through the straining down pipes sing!

E. S. Emerson.

Hark ! 11 is raining!

Don’t von hear the merrv din?

4-'    €

The mail-hoy is just slip rails. He never fails


coining through with the mails.


the


Hail, rain or snow,

His Majesty's mails must go.

Xow the rain is off shall we get the pail and look for snails?

Hark ! the pods are popping. The seeds are hopping away from the mother tree.

OUR SAILOR KING.

mail

rain

from

hop

snail

drain

through

hop ping

snail ing

strain

pop

pop ping

19th April. Discovery Day.

CAPTAIN COOK.


Captain James Cook was

a fine sailor. When he was a

little bov he lived oil a farm • •

in England. He was not very old when his father sent him to work at a shop. James did not like this work, and soon left to go to sea. lie worked so well that he soon became master of a ship. After some time Captain Cook was sent by King George 111. to sail to far-off lands and bring news of them. . During this voyage Captain Cook and his men saw Australia for the lirst time on 19th April, 1770. 19th April is now called Discovery Day. A few days after, they landed at Botany Bay, New South \\ ales. The sailors Hum planted the Union »Jack in the sandy beach. II you read the story of Captain Cook, you will find a strange race of black men were there.

The Black men had spears,

But the White men were brave,

And gave three British cheers.

As they saw their Hag wave.

St. George's Day. tl^ngiish)


23rd April.

The Cross of St George for England.


A loiur time


ago


a


great


and


good man called St. George lived in England. W e do not know much about him, hut we do know he was always ready to help the weak at the right time. King Arthur used the banner of St. George to remind his Knights of brave deeds done. You may see the picture of the Knights on the Hag of St. George to-day. 'I’he cross of St. George of Merry England is red. 'The lines are drawn from top to bottom and from side to side. This cross is part of the Enion Jack. St. George was called the White Knight. In England the rose is worn on St. George's Day, the 23rd April.


Shakespeare, the great

poet of England, was born

on 23rd April, St. George's

1 )av.

%/


To haul children early to think, this 1 consider the lirst and foremost object of child-t raining.


FROEBEL, the Children s Friend. 21st of April is his Birthday.


a


Apple-tree Town.

three wise men lived in Apple-tree Town,

n


So wise each M ore a big, big frow

Hiev couldn’t tell whether, ahem ! ahem !

«•

the Apple-seed points to the flower or the stem

Tis sad but true,

That none of them knew,

Do you? Do you? Do you?—

t    t    •

Mother A])])le-tree has been working to give her seed-babies a home. She will rest in a short time. While the seed-babies are growing, Mother Apple-tree hangs the apple-homes out on her branches in the fresh air. She works silently, and when they are ripe and ready to go, she puts on their ‘going-away’ dress to tell us. She is the first to know when they must leave her, and is glad to give you her seed-babies’ homes. She hopes you know that u hatch seed will make a little new tree,” and that you will be sure to plant some.

could

no

now

one

ba by

f/

si ¡(‘lit

cany

know

knew

none4

ba Dies

si lent ly

r modifies the vowel.

ar

er

ir

nr

or

or


ear

cer

ch

tsh }

sh

th

til

wh

11 w |

wh

=h

thr

ph

f

ch tsh th th sh


far, farm, farmer, star, carpenter, her, sister, father, mother, better, fir, firm, firmer, bird, birthday, cur, curly, turn, return, hurt, work, world, word, worm, for, form, fork, corn, chorus, born.

hear, near, clear, nearly, dearly, cheer, cheery.___

chip, chop, cherry, chin, change, chair, chalk, child, children, shall, shelter, should, shoulder, thin, thick, thumb, thank, this, that, these, those, their, there.

wheel, wheat, when, what, which, whistle, whether, where, why. who, whose, whom, whole, three, throw, threw, through.

Philip, Persephone, nephew._

which, catch, watch, stretch, much, path, with, width, depth, rather, father, weather, whether, cash, dash, wish, swish.

black, blue, blew.

Double

Consonants.

hi

gl

H

I>1


glad, gladly, glove, glass.

flat, flag, flew, flour, flower.

plenty, please, pleasant, place, plank.

bi


er

dr

IV


pi

ti-


wi — 1


st

sp

sc


branch, branches, brown, bright, bring, cry, crying, cried, croak, crimson, creek, dry, drink, drain, draw, dress.


fresh, fruit, frog, frock, from, fright grew, green, grass, ground, great, proud, prince, princess, prickle, true, truth, truly, trick, tram, write, wrap, wrong, wrist, wren.

stand, stood, story, stories, stain, spend, spoil, spoilt, splitter, sparrow scamp, scatter, scar, Scotch.


sw st r

scr

spi


swing, sweet, swell, swallow, string, stretch, strive, strange, strong, scratch, scream, scramble, sc raj), splitter, splice, splinter.

INITIAL H.—have, has, had, 1 nippy, harrow, hail, hay, hair, hare, hark, harvest, hard, head, heaven, help, helped, heap, here, hear, heard, himself, high, holiday, honey, home, hoop, horn, horses, how, hurry, hour, honest.

Empire Month.

Live Pure, speak true, right wrong, Follow the King!    —Tennyson.

Before all lands in Fast or \\ est,

1 love my native land the best.

1 do love my country's good.

With a respect more tender,

More holy and profound,

Than mine own life.    —Shakespeare.

There are only two rules for good manners, one is “Always think of others,” the other is “ Never think of yourself."

Dr. Jowett.

A noble life is not a blaze Of sudden glory won.

But just an adding up of days In which good work is done.

To


climb steep hills


requires slow pace at first.

Shakespeare.


To    be memorized.

17i    •    riv

empire lime.

May Dav, 1st Mav.

«7    «    7    e


Empire Day,


24th Maw «


May month is Empire month.

May is the spring of the year in the Mother Country. The iirst of May is May Day or May-pole day.

On the ‘24th May, 18P). a lniby girl was born in England. She had fair hair, fair skin, and bine eyes. She was such a bright, happy, little child that her father and mother called her uMay Blossom.'1 Her real name was Princess Victoria.

sisters nor brothers,

Princess Victoria had no and her father died when she was young. Her mother was wise and kind. She helped Victoria to be one of the great queens of the world.

Queen Victoria was queen of the British Empire, and Empire Day is to remind us of her noble life and work.

Our King George is Queen Victoria's grandson.

Arbor lime.

What does lie plant who plants a tree? lie plants cool shade and tender rain.

And seeds and buds of days to be.

And years that fade and blush again;

He plants the glory of the year;

He plants the forests’ heritage—

The harvest of a coining age;

The joy that unborn eyes shall see—

These things he plants who plants a tree.

Some trees keep their green dresses on all the year. The gum trees and the pine trees hardly change at all.

My sister and I have

our swing under the

big pine tree. The

days are short now, so #/

play time is soon over.

Just near our verandah is a very old tree, the ivy clings to its trunk and makes a home for the sparrows. They chatter*, chatter, chatter as they go to rest. Perhaps they are saying “Thank you for the shelter on cold nights.”

48

Some trees are dressed in brown just now.

readv for the Winter's cold and rain. The trees «/

seem hare, but, if you stand under the branches, and look up at the sky, you will see the lovely pictures the slender twigs make with the buds in their Winter coats. Mother Nature is saying to the trees, "Halt! iiest! Spring will bring yon a message:    Come out and be free to do your

work again!”'

Post and Rail Fences at the Farm.

The men at the farm are chopping down trees to clear the ground. These they will cut up into logs to he carted away. Some are for posts and rails for the farmer, some are for firewood, and some are taken to the saw-mills to be made into planks for the carpenter.

One inch, 1"---—

Two inches, 2" „—-----

Three inches, 3" -

12 inches 1 foot. 3 feet I yard.

Heigh ho! with a steady swing And a steady blow on blow,

I'ntil with a shout and a mighty crash

To the ground the gum trees go.

,

In the bush behind the farm the splitters are making palings and shingles. AN hen made, the palings and shingles will be carted away and sold. The gum trees are a useful family.

In forest deep, where the torrents leap,

Is the shingle splitter's home.

Kendall.

If a man know a tree to love it he will understand much of men, and of birds, and beasts, and of all living things. And of greater things too, for in the branches is other fruit than the fruit of the tree. Just as the rainbow is set in the sky for a promise, so is fruit in a tree set there; and the leaves show how orderly is the Great Plan; and the branches show the strength of slender things, and of little things, so that man may know how Heaven has its roots in earth, and its crest in the clouds.

FromThe Charm of Gardens," by Dion Clayton Calthrop.

J f

-rl

/I ?!

v-.: WV**' ' -

M v f. . ..

O fell

v I

■ I, 'il

\ / -7

mJJjf

’21st. June.

The Shortest Day of the Year.

The big lain]) of the world shines for less time to-day, in our country, than on any day of the rear.

The fire that warms you, the gas that you burn, and everything else that helps to give you light and warmth are the gifts of the great I)av King.

I.    O

For the Children on Winter Evenings.

Make covers for your books. Cut

«/

a hook marker. Tell mother and father the stories you heard at school. Plav

t.    t

games with the little ones. Build up the Union .Jack. Draw the Australian Flag.

U


What ever is worth doing is worth doing well."

Federal Reader Fart I.

Dictionary.

“r •

_


(Aa)

about

across

again

air

all

almost

alone

along

aloud

ahvavs

among

another

answer

anv

«/

apple

April

are

arms

as

asked

August A usl ralia A ntumn awake

awav

C

(Bb)

baby

*/

babies

baker

ball

bail

bare

barn

beach

bear

beating

because

before

began

Bess

best

better

birds

birthday

blew

bloom

blossom

blue

boats

born

both

bough

bound

boy

t/

box

branch

branches

brace

bread

bright

brings

broad

brothei'

.brought

brown

build

busy

t/

but

butter

clean

clearing

clings

clouds

clorer

coat

cold

coo-ee

comes

coming

corn

corner

could

country

cover

covered

cows

cream

creep

crimson

crop

cross

cry

t-

crying


(Ce)

cake

calendar

called

captain

carpet

carry

t

cart

carted

catch

cattle

chain

chance

change

chase

chatter

cheer

cherries

cherry

child*

children

chopping

class

classes


curly

custom

(1 )d)

dance

danger

daintv

t

days

dear

December

deeds

de\y

did

die

died

(litter

disgrace

distress

done

down

drain

draw

< 1 ray

t/

dress

dresses

drew

drink

drove

during

(Ee)

each

early

Faster

easy

t

egg el st1

emblem

emu

eyening

eyervone

e yery tiling

e\ery where «

faces

tails

fair

fallen

family

€>

farm

farmer

fast

fat

father

February

feet

few

tight

filled

girl

harrow

tine

give

harvest

tire

glad

has

firewood

God

have

first

golden

hav

t

flag

good-bye

havst-acl

t

flat

got

head

flew

grain

heap

flour

great

hear

flower

green

heard

follow

greetings

help

foot

grew

helped

forest

grind

here

fork

ground

herself

forty (401

grow

himself

found

grown

holiday

«/

four (4)

grumbling

holy

f

free

guide

home

fresh

gum

hoop

fro

from

(Hh)

hope

horn

Friday

horses

frock

had

house

fruit

hail

ho w

(Gg)

hand

happy

happily 1 1

hurry

(li)

games

hard

garden

hardly

t/

inch

gate

hark

\es


* J ao k d anuary

jolly

joy

juicy

jump

d une

just


(Kk)

keep

kept

kindly

kindness

king

knew

know


insects

ivy

(LI)

land

lane

last

later

-

leaves

Mav

t

near

let

mean

needle

letters

meeting

never

life

merry

t

new

lifted

message

next

lines

might

noble

light

milk

nobodv •

little

milking

nodding

live

miller

noise

lived

mine

none

loaf

mistress

north

loiter

Mondav

t/

nothing

longer

month

November

looked

more

now

lost

morning

loved

mother

(Oo)

lovely

mould

loval

€/

mouth

()ctol>er

move

once

(Mm)

mow

one

much

open

made

must

other

maid

my

•>

oval

maiden

mvself

«/

oyer

mail

make

(Nn)

(pp)

making

mate

narrow

paddock

March

native

pail

master

nature

pair


paling

passed

past

peach

peaches

people

perhaps

pet

Fete

pict lire

jiine

pins

pint

pipe

piping-

plank

plate

play

played

please

pleasant

plenty

pluck

pretty

promise

pure

push

put

(Qq)

ride

seeds

soak

riding

send

soft

quart

ring

sense

soil

quickly

ripe

September

sold

quiet

ripen

service

some

quietly

rise

shade

something

quite

river

shall

sometimes

(Kr)

roots

sheaves

soon

round

sheep

southern

race

rose

shelter

sown

rail

roval

V

ship

sparrow

railway

shine

speak

rain

(Ss)

shingle

spied

raining

shoot

splinter

rake

sack

short

splitter

rare

safe

should

sprang

rather

said

shout

spread

ray

sailor

shower

spring-

ravs

saint

silent

stand

read

Saturday

t/

silently

#/

stain

ready

saw

since

star

real

sawmills

sing-

step

reap

say

sister

still

remember

saying

skip

stocking

remind

says

sleep

stand

respect

scatter

slender

stooks

return

school

slip

story-

requires

sea

smoke

strange

right

season

snail

stretch

rich

secret

snake

strip

stripper

stick

sugar

Summer

sun

sunny

sunburnt

Sunday

t,*

sweet

swing

swish

tail

take

taken

tall

talk

teacher

tell

than

thank

thank-you

that

their

Tuesdar

m

(Ww) I

them

turn

wait

there

twelve (1.2)

want

they

t

two (2)

think

twigs

war

this

was

through

(Uu)

watch

Thursday

water

uncle

till

under

way

weak

times

underneath

tiny

weather

to

union

Wednesday

t

1

until

to-day

week

together

upon

well

toil

use

went

too

used

were

took

useful

western

tossing-

uses

what

town

(Vv)

wheat

train

wheel

tree

yanish

when

tried

vast

where

trouble

yerandah

whether

true

very

which

truly

t/

vice

while

try

visit

white

year '- 'h>w you

you r

> •


who

whole

why

will

wind

Winter

wise

wish

with

without

won

wonder

word

work

world

would

write

writer

wrong


Deakin

University


Library


Presented by:

Dolley Family

• •'s» X

1

low beautiful is the rain !

A Iter the dust and heat,

In the broad and dusty street, I n the narrow lane,

How beautiful is the rain !    —

39