A complete guide for the busy housewife: new and tempting dishes that save money and preserve the family’s health; diet suggestions for each month of the year.

Approved by The Health Publicity Council of Australia.

Modern, money-saving recipe suggestions for family cooking : a programme for health by the Preventative Dentistry Sub-Committee of the AUSTRALIAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION (Victorian Branch).

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R Y I T A

ENGLISH CRISPBREAD (A WESTON'S PRODUCT)

EAT FOR HEALTH

A conijilolo programme for health of both body and teeth

HThIS valuable little book contains the facts which everyone should * know about dental health and the ;prevention of dental disease. But more than this, it provides in a simple, easily followed pla?i, a programme of diet designed to ensure good health for the body as well as guarding the teeth. Compiled by a team of experts from the Preventative Dentistry Bub-Committee of the Australian Dental Board (Victorian Branch), it explains the causes of tooth decay and methods of elimination of such decay, the care which should be given to the teeth of both children and adidts, the manner by which food habits may be diverted from the injurious to the healthy, and which foods in themselves do good and which do harm. Actual daily menus, prepared with an eye to economy, are provided for every day of the year, and an assortment of recipes are added as a guide for the housewife who wishes to ensure that her family should eat not only for enjoyment but also to obtain the maximum nourishment necessary for health of both body and teeth.

' CONTENTS

4 Home Care Of The Mouth...... 20

14    Diversion Not Denial ......... 23

15    Why Do We Need An Egg A Day? 23 The importance Of Learning To

10 Chew . .    . .    ...... 23

lrz Care Of A Partial Denture...... 23

Food Rules For Good Health ....    25

18    Daily Menus Throughout The Year 32

19    Recipes For Health ..    ....    45


Basic Dental Facts .........

That Breakfast Meal .. .. ......

Sugar And Energy    ........

How To Gain And Maintain Your Child’s Co-operation    .

Suggestions For Children’s Parties Modern Methods Oi Cooking

Vegetables .............

Fluorides    ..............

A COLORGRAVURE PUBLICATION

What everyone should know about Dental Health and the prevention of Dental Disease.

Is this just another diet booklet?

NO II it were, there would be very little reason for its publication, for surely there is an abundance of attractive and reliable literature on this subject There would be still less reason for the close association of the dental profession with such a publication

This booklet presents the only dietary of its kind published with the express purpose of safeguarding, the teeth of the nation. As the story of dental decay unfolds in the succeeding paragraphs, the danger to the teeth presented by many foods will be explained, and ways for their elimination from the dietary outlined But, in the meantime, is this dietary correct and balanced by other than dental standards?

Yes. it is Those responsible for its compilation have taken great care to ensure that the accepted standards of nutrition are met. The reader need not be concerned about an adequate amount of Calories Vitamins. Proteins, Fats. Carbohydrates and Minerals All these factors have been worked out in great detail. The emphasis throughout this booklet will be on the dental significance of the dietary. The basic principles of nutrition have been met. and will henceforth be taken for granted.

And what about cost?

Well, it was drawn up to conform to the basic wage for a family of four, two adults and two children Housewives will find it eminently practical, and the household budget will not be overstrained to meet its cost Now to get down to facts Just what has diet to do with dental decay? To answer this question it will be necessary to give an outline of the basic proven facts of the decay process

1.    The outer surface of the crown of a tooth is covered with enamel.

2.    A cavity in a tooth commences with the dissolution of enamel by acids.

And where do these acids come from? Certain mouth bacteria are capable of fermenting certain food debris remaining about the teeth after eating.

What kind of food debris? Only refined Carbohydrate food debris is significant. In fact it may be said that ninety per cent, of dental decay comes from sugar, and ten per cent, from starch Sugar rots teeth.

This dietary reduces the average Australian consumption of sugar from 132 pounds per person per year to 30 pounds.

It is true that there are on the market many methods for preventing dental decay which have various degrees of success.

But, the most fundamental, and the one which offers by far the greatest degree of prevention against decay, is the drastic reduction in the consumption of sugar.

For most people, the only thing necessary for the prevention of most, if not all, new cavities forming in their teeth is an act of will power.

Cut out—or drastically reduce—the consumption of refined Carbohydrates in all their forms, and a vast array of laboratory and clinical evidence will assure you of freedom from further dental decay

What are the common articles of diet which must be eliminated?

1.    Sugar, brown or white.

2.    All chocolates, lollies and sweets.

3.    All sweetened cordial drinks.

4.    Biscuits, with few exceptions, especially the sugared variety

5.    All jams—other than those mentioned in this dietary made with little or no sugar

6    Practically all cakes, especially those made with much sugar and icing, etc.

7    Most proprietary breakfast foods.

But surely there must be other methods for preventing decay?

Yes there are, and later in this booklet they will be outlined and evaluated All of them are time consuming, some of them are costly, and none of them are nearly as efficient as is the drastic reduction in the consumption of sugar.

Proper tooth cleaning is most important, the application of sodium fluoride to the teeth offers

So

Swed


Healthful and golden as the bright morning sunshine! Pure Australian Honey for your family. The children love it!


good results, perhaps the addition of a very little sodium fluoride to the communal water supply may be an advisable procedure—but more of these things later.

for Radiant Health!


PASTEURISED — IRRADIATED

(Keeps indefinitely)

World-famous dretitians and nutritionists believe that certain natural wonder foods hold the key to healthier, longer, most youthful life. FOREMOST AMONG THESE IS POWDERED BREWERS' YEAST.

Make your food more nourishing:—

Add CENOVIS VEASX to your daily diet for radiant health — energy — quick zest.

CENOVIS YEAST contains 17 NATOItAL vitamins (7 times more potent than synthetic vitamins), 16 amino acids and 14 essential minerals, and is practically free from sugar, starch and fat.

CENOVIS YEAST provides a powerful intake in a palatable form of the complete vitamin B group.

CENOVIS YEAST—vitamin content is guaranteed.

CENOVIS YEAST ensures perfect digestion & full nutrition, contains no drugs & can be classified as a highly vitaminised natural food. Overdosing is NOT possible.

The irradiation of CENOVIS YEAST makes it rich in vitamin D & therefore of the utmost value to pre-natal & post-natal diets.

CENOVIS YEAST is an excellent tonic for ' children. Taken daily it strengthens their constitution and builds up resistance against illness. CENOVIS YEAST is also obtainable in tablet form.    .

HOW & WHEN TO TAKE CENOVIS YEAST.

CENOVIS YEAST can be taken by both children & adults at any time — can be mixed with water, milk, tomato or fruit juices, or added to food — is an excellent pick-you-up drink between meals and may be taken before retiring. Vitamin B cannot be stored in the body and should be obtained daily if vigorous, abundant health is to be maintained Such a marked pick-up in health is noticed after taking ' CENOVIS YE.YST 3 or 4 times daily for 2 weeks that most people look to yeast as a food and continue to use it daily.

OBTAINABLE FROM CHEMISTS or direct from

CENOVIS YEAST HEALTH SERVICE

6 ELIZABETH ST., MELB. Cent. 7598-9

CONSULT CENOVIS YEAST FREE HEALTH ADVISORY SERVICE. SPECIALISTS IN VITAMIN THERAPY.

“FOR LIFE TAKE YOUR DAILY YEAST“


This fact remains The drastic reduction in the consumption of sugar is the easiest to achieve, the least costly—and the most efficient way at present known to dental science for the prevention ol dental decay.

But perhaps this conception of the cause ol dental decay is not what you have heard or read about Perhaps you are familiar with what dentists call the Structural Theory of Dental Decay Briefly this theory would suggest that a perfectly formed tooth in the mouth of a child is far less susceptible if not immune, to decay than one less perfectly formed. To this end expectant mothers have consumed large quantities of calcium and certain Vitamins, and fed large quantities of these substances to theii children during the formative stages of their children’s teeth Unhappily, immunity to dental decay has not followed such a procedure. Those who advocate the acid destruction theory of dental decay do not decry the desirability for perfectly formed teeth and jaws—far from it; for many reasons they strongly advocate it. In fact, under the same conditions of environment, a tooth less structurally sound will experience far greater destruction by decay than one perfectly formed

But it is said most emphatically, that no matter how well formed a tooth may be, if sugary and starchy food debris be left about the teeth then certain mouth bacteria will produce acids of sufficient concentration to decalcify the enamel, and initiate a cavity

Does pregnancy influence dental decay?

And whilst on the subject of current fallacies in our knowledge of dental decay, let us talk for a moment about pregnancy and dental decay It has often been said that expectant mothers experience an increased susceptibility to dental decay, attributable to their pregnancy Whilst it is not denied that certain changes may take place in the soft tissues, or gums, in the mouths of expectant mothers and possibly transient, innocent tumours appear, it is not true that any increased incidence of dental decay is attributed directly to the pregnancy

It has been suggested that the needs of the developing child for Calcium and other salts is met by withdrawing these salts from the teeth of the mother, and so rendering them “soft’' and more susceptible to decay.

WHICH TOOTHPASTE GETS TEETH WHITER

than any other toothpaste?

Miss Joyce Ferguson, Sydney Secretary, gave us her smile for these pictures.


Only Pepsodent contains Irium to get rid of

RUN THE TIP OF YOUR TONGUE OVER YOUR TEETH.

Feel that slimy film ! Film builds continuously on everyone’s teeth, clouding natural whiteness, assisting decay. Only Pepsodent contains Irium, the scientific cleansing agent which removes film. Pepsodent does not contain harsh abrasives often found in ordinary toothpaste. That’s why Pepsodent gets teeth whiter than any other toothpaste.

This is not so. It has been proved scientifically that Calcium salts cannot be withdrawn from enamel into the circulating blood. A careful physician will ensure that an expectant mother takes an adequate amount of Calcium for her own needs, and the needs of the child. However, should this not be so, the unborn child may call upon the Calcium salts from the bones of the mother—but not her teeth.

That some mothers do seem to have more decay during pregnancy than otherwise, may be explained firstly by the fact that usually more regular and thorough dental attention is sought at this time, and cavities previously formed are detected. Secondly, most physicians and dentists insist at this time on the elimination from the mouth of all teeth which may be a possible source of infection, and so some teeth may be lost. Thirdly, expectant mothers often develop a craze for certain foodstuffs, often this craze is for sweets and sweetened foods, which are eaten usually between meals. And finally, expectant mothers in the press of events with so many extra things to think of and do, often pay less attention to the care of the mouth than was their habit previously. It may be said that pregnancy is not responsible for an increased incidence of dental decay in the teeth of the expectant mother.

Are the child’s foundation teeth importa.nt?

And while mentioning the child’s teeth, let us have a few words to say regarding the importance of the foundation dentition. The foundation teeth of the child, twenty in number, are usually known as the deciduous teeth, the milk teeth, the baby teeth, and so on. Because they do not remain in the mouth normally beyond the tenth to twelfth year most people greatly underestimate their importance and significance.

They are in fact the foundation teeth. Upon their healthy stay in the mouth will depend to a tremendous degree the susceptibility of their successors, the permanent teeth, not only to decay but to other forms of dental diseases.

For example, the too early loss of the foundation teeth—usually caused by decay—is regarded by many specialists to be the prime cause of crowding and displacement in the permanent teeth, so very common amongst Australian people. With crowding and displacement comes costly and lengthy specialist treatment for its correction, much greater incidence of decay, and in later life, far greater susceptibility to pyorrhoea It is of vital importance to see that the foundation teeth be safeguarded from the ravages of dental disease. If decay does intervene then these teeth must be adequately filled, and should a foundation tooth have to be lost, the space in the child’s mouth so created must be maintained to avoid later crowding.

To ensure the health of your child's teeth, periodical visits to the dentist are most important. Children who can show a perfect set of teeth, like those of the little boy at right, will have no fear of such occasions.

tgare ifnte and money utrtf>

SO EASY

TO GIVE KIDDIES THEIR MILK IN THIS LUSCIOUS, NOURISHING DESSERT !

Mellah

1 pkt. Chocolate Mellah, 1 pt. Milk, 2 bananas

1.    Make Chocolate Mellah according to directions. Cool.

2.    Pour into serving dish and as it firms, swirl the surface boldly with a spoon.

3.    At serving time arrange banana rings in the swirled Mellah.

The premature loss of a foundation tooth may be considered to be a far more tragic and costly loss than the loss of a permanent tooth— that is, if the permanent teeth are to be adequately safeguarded.

Licorice Confections

The manufacture of Licorice requires enormous plant and heavy machinery and it cannot be produced in the home. It is a job for the specialist in a specialising factory

Many confections can be made and packed within an hour. Licorice, however, is produced in a process extending over several davs.

Here is the Story of the “NIGGER BOY” Process—

Carefully selected. raw material is melted into a syrup and filtered through specially fine strainers into huge steam boiling and mixing kettles of a half ton capacity. Under high steam pressure the licorice syrup is kept boiling for several hours, until this refining process produces a ■ smooth, black tasty paste. This licorice paste, while hot, is deposited into cooling moulds and left to mature for 24 hours, after which it is placed in an enormous cylindrical machine. Being subjected to high pressure, it is extruded through appropriate dies into the desired shapes and sizes. The licorice thus extruded is then placed in a drying chamber to remove excess moisture before being packed.

Not only are “Nigger Boy” licorice sticks tasty confections, but they also have a high nutritive food value.


Made in the Modern Hygiene Licorice Refinery of

NATIONAL LICORICE Company

46-56 HAWTHORN RD„ CAdLFIELD, S.E.7, ViC.


But, if parents teach correct food habits early in life, will these habits remain, or will it be a constant battle to prevent the consumption of sugar?

It has been shown repeatedly that a child brought up to regard sugar as a menace to hi: teeth, served attractive, appetising foods that do not contain sugar, will not develop an urge for sugar. And, when in the company of children not so instructed and trained, will resist the temptation to succumb to sugar. Perhaps, as you read this, and think of your own dependence on sugar you will think this childtraining to be only an idealistic dream. .

That is not so. There is abundant proof that correct food habits, taught early enough and consistently with full explanation, not forgetting acceptable substitutes, will remain, and will safeguard the teeth of the child against the appalling onslaughts of dental decay.

Unfortunately, dependent as we are upon modern civilised dietary, it is virtually impossible to eliminate sugar. What we must aim at is the drastic reduction in its intake And because these drastic reductions may vary in some families from an almost total elimination to the denial of only an occasional sweet—the results will, of course, vary also. In those mouths which are denied the least sugar, some cavities will occur

Here we come to what may be called repair dentistry in the mouth of the child.

The repair of a decayed tooth is not the prevention of decay—but, in a more limited sense, is the prevention of what otherwise might certainly be the loss of the tooth. As such it is a most necessary adjunct to any plan for prevention But, unhappily in the past, we have thought of prevention only in terms of repair. Even dentists and governments have thought of prevention in the same terms.

We must now regard repair dentistry as a necessary adjunct to what may be an incomplete adherence to the fundamental principles of prevention. See your dentist twice a year remains good advice, but on an unrestricted refined Carbohydrate dietary, this will not adequately prevent the loss of teeth, as many thousands of dental patients will testify.

It is possible you know of someone who eats any amount of sugar and sweetened foods, who

Scientific Facts About Teeth and Gums

DENTISTS will tell you the surprising fact that more teeth are lost through gum trouble than decay. Just by keeping your teeth white you won’t keep them safe . . . because teeth are only as safe as the gums they grow in.

That’s why you should use a toothpaste especially designed to care for gums as well as teeth. Gibbs S.R. gives you this extra care — it’s the only leading toothpaste that contains Sodium Ricinoleate which is often used in the treatment of gum troubles.

Gibbs S.R. gives whiteness and protection. By using Gibbs S.R. straight after every meal you ensure sparkling white teeth in firm healthy gums.

Apart from its distinct medical advantage Gibbs S.R. is an ideal toothpaste — it has a rich foam, a smooth texture and a clean refreshing flavour.    .

Remember — see your dentist twice a year . . . use Gibbs S.R. regularly.

pays no attention to the home care of the mouth, and yet has little or no dental decay. The dental profession is aware of these cases, too. In fact they are estimated to number about five per cent, of the population, and recent advances in the prevention of decay have centred around a careful examination of iust what goes on in the mouths of these people, to make them exempt from the decay which is so characteristic of our modern times.

It has been found, for example, that an organism known as lacto-bacillus, found in millions per cubic centimeter of saliva in a person highly susceptible to decay, is absent from the mouths of this small percentage of the population who have the good fortune to be practically immune to the ravages of dental decay.

Just what inhibits the growth and multiplication of these organisms is the subject of a great deal of research. At the present moment the dental profession cannot give a complete and satisfying answer to this five per cent, decay immunity. But they can say with certainty that, as the refined Carbohydrates are cut out of the diet, these lacto-bacilli organisms fall in number, and the incidence of new cavities also.

And what does the future hold for the prevention of this scourge of civilisation?

The most attractive line of research being pursued at the moment is an endeavor to add to refined sugars some harmless, tasteless substance which will prevent the organisms in the mouth causing the fermentation of sugars and the production of acids.

Certain substances have been tried, with varying degrees of success, but the time is not yet ripe for a wholesale adoption of any of these “enzyme inhibitors” as they are called.

When this substance has been discovered, its addition to refined sugars will make them dentally harmless and then not even an act of will power will be necessary for the prevention of dental decay.

This discovery, when it comes, may well rank with the major medical discoveries of the world —the discovery of the circulation of the blood, of X-rays, of radium, of insulin, of penicillin.

But for the present—bearing in mind all the other aids toward the prevention of decay—the drastic reduction in the consumption of refined Carbohydrates offers by far the best results in the battle to prevent dental decay.

Let your hand hesitate as you add that spoonful of suga r to your tea. Remember, sugar rots teeth, it ruins appetite, it is not necessary for energy, it contains no minerals, no protein, no fats, no roughage and no vitamins.

Nutritionists are frequently stressing that the first meal of the day is truly a break fast, and should bear an adequate relationship to the nutritional needs of the day.

So often breakfast consists of a plate of some proprietary pre-cooked cereal, heavily sugared, with milk added, toast and marmalade, with coffee or tea

Let us examine this meal for a moment. Most packets of proprietary breakfast foods have the words “malt and sugar added” on their labels The very nature of the food demands much additional sugar, and when moistened with milk and later saliva, such cereals assume a sticky, clinging mass, difficult to remove from the teeth and productive of dental decay.

Quite apart from the nutritional inadequacy of this breakfast meal, it is a positive hazard to dental health.

The menus set out in this booklet supply f variety of acceptable breakfast meals. Most housewives do not provide a sufficiently varied breakfast diet for their families.

The following is offered as an ideal breakfast The juice of an orange poured over a coarsely grated apple Follow this by one or two poached eggs on wholegrain, buttered toast. Then a beverage to taste, which for the child shouldalways be a glass of milk. If a cereal is eaten choose the most wholegrain product available.

A few minutes before porridge or other similar cereals are cooked, add chopped dates, raisins, or sultanas. The last few minutes’ cooking time will release sufficient sweetness from the dried fruits to render the addition of sugar unnecessary.

A sliced banana will also add appeal to this dish.

Cereals are an excellent way of increasing the child’s milk consumption and the cereal saturated two or three times will help greatly in this respect.

Make breakfast your break fast. Make sure it is a meal nutritionally adequate for yom needs. Eliminate the dentally dangerous foods from your breakfast table.

■■ w


Breakfast, such as that shown below, should bear an adequate relationship to the nutritional needs of the day.

Sugar has often been stressed as a source of energy—and it has been implied that sufficient energy for our daily needs cannot be achieved without abundant sugar.

Carbohydrates generally are the principal source of energy in the average diet. But, in fact, one unit of Fat contains at least twice the energy content of one unit of Carbohydrates. Proteins may also contribute to energy. There are many unrefined Carbohydrates included in the dietary supplied in this booklet to safeguard its energy value, and a figure of 2500 Calories per day and higher has been achieved on one quarter the usual intake of sugar.

Sugar requires abundant Vitamin B for its complete conversion to energy, and a diet rich in sugar and low in Vitamin B—as most dietaries are—results in the intermediate breakdown products of Carbohydrates accumulating in the tissues. Such a faulty diet results in lethargy tiredness, lack of sustained interest.

Remember: Adequate energy has been assured in this dietary, with very little sugar intake.

Excessive sugar consumption, without a great deal of Vitamin B. may have a harmful effect.

HINTS ON HOW TO RESTRICT THE USE OF SUGAR AND FLOUR

Substitute dried fruits, figs, dates, prunes, sultanas, raisins for sugar as sweetening agents.

Substitute wholemeal for white flour always.

Eliminate sugar in jellies. Use pure fruit juice, water and gelatine instead.

Eliminate sugar and white flour in pastry. Wholemeal flour makes excellent pastry.

FACTS ABOUT SUGAR

Sugar rots teeth.

Sugar ruins appetite.

Sugar is not necessary for energy.

Sugar does not contain Minerals which are necessary to build bones and good teeth.

Sugar does not contain Protein, which builds muscle and tissue.

Sugar does not contain Fats which keep us warm.

Sugar does not contain Roughage which keeps the bowels regular.

Sugar does not contain Vitamins, but it increases the need for them.

Cut down sugar—it is not necessary. It is nothing more than a modern habit-forming fad

Below are shown a tew of the many substitutes for sugar. Salads made of raw fruit require no sweetening, and their juices make healthful drinks. Dried fruits, added to dishes such as porridge, are excellent sugar substitutes.

child’s co-operation

From earliest feeding days, immediately after baby has been weaned, the addition of sugar to the child’s food must be kept to an absolute minimum. Sugar is an acquired taste, and every effort must be made to prevent the development of a “sweet tooth.”

Until the child is capable of understanding a reasoned explanation of why he should not eat sugar, parental prohibition of sugar, in all its forms, is necessary.

As soon as the child is able to understand the damage to his teeth and to his health which sugar will cause, give him the reasoned explanation and rely on his good sense to carry it out. In this respect, it is an object lesson for him to see other children with aching, abscessed teeth; or in the case of a pretty little girl, to see a friend with a front tooth missing because of decay. Such visual aids reinforce the value of the explanation of what sugar will do to teeth.

Do not underestimate your child in this respect; appeal to his sense of values; place him upon his initiative. Tell him that he may have sugar, eat sweets, cakes and biscuits, but that he cannot have his own teeth as well. Ask him which he would prefer, his own teeth, free from decay, pain and disfigurement, or some sweets?

Do not overlook acceptable substitutes. Do not create in the child some sense of being peculiar and different from other children Instead of cakes and biscuits, substitute a piece of fresh fruit; instead of lollies and chocolates all manner of nuts and dried fruits; instead oi the usual cordial drinks, fresh fruit juices.

And finally, if your child’s teeth are important to you as a parent, you will forgo some sugar yourself—to set an example.

A FEW PRACTICAL HINTS

Remember children eat well at meals when hungry, therefore, do not give them any snacks between meals.

Restrict your child to three meals daily A piece of fruit, or a glass of milk should be his only “play lunch."

Do not fuss over children at meal-time.

Do not worry if the child eats less one day— he will make up for it tomorrow.

Some children like milk better when taken through a straw.

Raw peanuts roasted in a slow oven for about ten minutes are cheap and very popular. Nuts in the shell are also appreciated, as the children enjoy cracking them.

Ice cream is better made at home without the addition of sugar.

Drinks of pure fruit juice are relished by all children Milk drinks, if served as milk shakes or cocoa in colored glasses or mugs and with drinking straws, are popular with most.

As children grow a little older, give them a buffet meal. They love to choose for themselves.

It is up to you to cultivate the “right food” habits—your child will then not develop the wrong ones. Remember to serve appetisingly.

It is often helpful to encourage children who are not fond of milk by letting them drink it through a straw.

SUGG

children’s parties

There is no need for the children’s party to be the occasion where your careful control of your child’s diet breaks down

Not only is it true that "no party need end with a tummy ache,’’ but also that "no party need endanger children’s teeth.”

Let the decorations be lavish, not the food, and remember the attractiveness of color in your display

Sandwiches should be made from wholemeal bread, liberally buttered and filled with Vege-mite or Marmite, peanut butter, chopped dates or raisins cheese and lettuce, or meat

Wholemeal oread and butter, cut in the shape of fingers, and served with sticks of cheese or slices of apple or banana are attractively appetising

Children's beverages should be milk, colored if desired, 01 pure fruit juices unsweetened Avoid proprietary soft drinks and cordials

The birthday cake should be made of wholemeal flour with the minimum of sugai and decorated — not with icing — but with variously colored whipped cream, using the variety of designs usually reserved for icing sugar.

Sweet and iced biscuits should not be served, but wholegrain biscuits make a suitable base for brightly colored and attractive savories

The ice cream should be home made without sugar; and. served with a slice of pineapple with a halved banana standing in the middle or with a cherry on the top, it is most attractive Bananas, split and rolled in flour and breadcrumbs, with a pinch of salt and a squeeze of lemon juice, may be baked in an oven with a little water Serve with a boiled custard to which a few sultanas have been added foi sweetening. Use no sugar.

Instead of sweets and lollies serve minced raisins, figs, sultanas prunes, peanuts—in fact any mixture of dried fruits and nuts—moistened with lemon or orange juice and rolled into balls in grated coconut or minced nuts.

Fruit salads, made from ripe fruit just before serving, require no sweetening.

Sugarless jellies may be made from gelatine and pure fruit juices. Such jellies poured into a halved orange peel or rock melon are very colorful, and have an irresistible appeal

#

These illustrations show how attractive the foods suggested on this page can look. Below are halved melons with sugarless jelly filling the scooped out middies.

MODERN METHODS OF COOKING

In a balanced diet we require Protein, Fat. Carbohydrate, Vitamins, Minerals, Roughage and Water. Vegetables provide all these factors We do not, as a rule, rely solely upon vegetables for Protein or Fats, as more direct sources are available from other foods. The selection of vegetables requires some care in order to give us a meal which satisfies all the known requirements. Potatoes are in a group which possesses 20 per cent, of their bulk in Carbohydrate while asparagus and lettuce contain only 5 per cent. Dried beans are rich in Calcium and Phosphorus. All green or yellow vegetables have a high Vitamin A content; citrus fruits and tomatoes Vitamin C.

Pressure cookers are now an accepted and almost universal aid to cooking.

Most housewives are convinced of their value Women have proved pressure cookers add palat-ability and attractiveness to food, save space on the stove, eliminate a number of saucepans; reduce fuel costs, and save cooking time.

But perhaps housewives do not realise that foods cooked this way retain more nutritive value than those prepared in the old fashioned “open kettle’’ method.

For example, Minerals, vital to health, are usually soluble in water, and are largely dissolved out and poured away by older cooking methods Pressure cookers, using minimum water, retain the maximum possible amount of Minerals in cooked vegetables.

Vitamin C, a most valuable constituent of many vegetables, may be partially destroyed in cooking. In a stainless steel saucepan, as much as thirty-four per cent, may be lost. In pressure cooker .only nine to ten per cent, for certain vegetables is destroyed.

Observe the following rules to retain the maxi mum nutritive values when cooking vegetables:—

1.    Use a pressure cooker.

2.    Use the correct amount of water. Recipes

will indicate the amount necessary.

3.    Time cooking period carefully. Do not overcook

4.    Serve immediately vegetables are cooked.

Overcooking and delay in serving will destroy

further the Vitamin C content.

Always use the correct amount of water in your pressure cooker. The recipe will indicate exact requirements.


Above: Time cooking period carefully; do not overcook. Below: Serve immediately the vegetables are cooked.

Popular press reports have given much publicity to Fluorine during the past few years. What can be expected from this element as far as the teeth are concerned?

Fluorine in the pure state is a gas, but because it is so active it is never found free in nature. It combines readily with other substances to form Fluorides

Fluorides may be present in the water supply of certain districts in minute quantities. It has been found that if too great a concentration is present there may be disfigurements of the enamel of the teeth, resulting in a condition known as ‘mottled enamel.” Mottled teeth are rough, pitted and marked with brown stains Even though these teeth are so disfigured and stained, yet they are less susceptible to dental decay than the teeth of people born and bred in an area where Fluorides are absent from the water supply. Investigations have shown that when Fluorides are present in a concentration of one part per million there is lessened dental decay, and no noticeable disfigurement Most of the water supplies in Australia are Fluoride free

At the present time, in the United States of America, controlled studies are in progress in a number of cities to determine whether the addi tion of small amounts of Fluoride to the water supply will be as beneficial as naturally occurring Fluoride water It will be some years before the final results of these tests are published. Interested scientific bodies in Australia are watching these experiments with great interest.

The beneficial results of Fluorides in drinking water led dental scientists to the discovery that solutions of Fluoride applied to the teeth of thousands of children resulted in a decrease of dental decay on an average of 40 per cent., when compared with a similar number of children with untreated teeth. Such applications help prevent new decay in children, but once decay has started Fluorides do not appear to have any effect

In suitable cases the following treatment is instituted Four separate applications are given at intervals of a few days. First the dentist cleans the teeth, and then applies the solution. This series of applications is carried out at the ages of 3, 7, 10 and 13 years to protect each group of teeth as they erupt, i.e., sixteen visits to the dentist are needed

It must be realised that Fluoride treatment in any form is a partial preventive. Worthwhile results can only be expected if sugary foods are restricted and correct teeth cleaning is always employed immediately after eating a meal.

Fluorides play an important part in the prevention of dental decay. The illustrations below show the type of machine used for introducing Fluorides into the water supply, and a dentist applying Fluorine solution to a child's teeth.

.ARE

of the mouth

For tooth-brushing to be effective:—

1.    Food debris must be removed immediately after eating It has been shown that acid, capable of etching a tooth, forms a few minutes after eating sugary foods. Tooth cleaning must be practised before this acid forms.

2.    It must be done thoroughly. Casual brushing for appearance sake just round the front teeth is a waste of time and effort, and only gives a false sense of security.

3.    The toothbrush recommended by most dental authorities should have a small, straight head of two or three rows of medium stiff bristles. It should be kept clean and discarded when the tufts lose their original shape.

Decay begins in three main areas:—

1.    On the grinding surfaces.

2.    Between teeth.

3.    Along the gum margins.

These three areas, therefore, should receive special attention.

CLEAN YOUR TEETH TO A PLAN

1.    Clean one surface of only two teeth at a time.

2.    Commence with your upper molars on the left side

3.    Place the bristles of the brush at right angles to the teeth, with one row of bristles against the gums and two rows against the teeth.

4.    Vibrate the brush so that the bristles pass in between the teeth.

5.    With some of the bristles in between the teeth, rotate the brush in small circles.

Now move forward two teeth nearer to the centre of the mouth, and so right acioss the cheek and lip surfaces of all the upper teeth.

Then apply the brush in the same methodical manner to the tongue surfaces of the uppei teeth    .

Finally, the grinding surfaces may be cleaned by punching the bristles up into the grooves and pits on these surfaces.

Then carry out exactly the same careful and methodical cleaning of the lower teeth.

Finally, take a mouthful of water, close the lips, and using the cheeks as a pump, force the water vigorously between the teeth. Spit out and repeat.

CLEANING CHILDREN S TEETH

The Primary, or Foundation teeth, should be cleaned from the age of two years by the parent. A child of even six or seven years cannot clean his teeth properly without supervision The pre-school child, after his teeth have been cleaned for him, will no doubt want to try, too. Even if he just chews the brush at first it is good for him to feel he is doing a part himself, for tooth-brushing should be cultivated as a habit. It is important to choose a small brush for a child, and provide a stool so that he can reach up to the wash basin.

The avoidance of refined sugary and starchy foods, combined with efficient tooth cleansing, will help to prevent decay.

But tooth cleaning, without dietary control, can only lessen dental decay.

DETERGENT FOODS AND RINSING

The thorough home care of the mouth as outlined above is the ideal method of tooth preservation.

Where this procedure may not be carried out, two principles are a great help in ridding the mouth of food debris.

1.    Always finish the meal with a detergent food, such as—

A piece of carrot.

A few stalks of celery.

Crisp, whole, lettuce leaves.

A crisp, firm apple.

A pear.

These detergent foods will help to carry the softer, sticky foods away from the teeth.

2.    Take a mouthful of water, close the lips, use the cheeks as a pump, and vigorously force the water between the teeth, spit out and repeat.

These methods are only a second best to careful tooth brushing. They should be used in conjunction with brushing—or, by themselves where circumstances make brushing impossible.

1. Brush, right angles to outer cheek surface, molar teeth, one row of bristles on gum, two rows on teeth. (When brushing molar teeth, the jaw should be half closed and the cheeks relaxed to permit the brush to reach the far surfaces.)

CLEAN YOUR TEETH REGULARLY
TO THIS STEP-BY-STEP PLAN

2. Vibrate the brush, bristles to pass


This action causes between the teeth.

Now, with some bristles in between teeth, rotate the brush in small circles. This cleans in between the teeth, the outer surface, and massages the gum.

Move forward two teeth and repeat the’ procedure Continue around cheek and lip surfaces of the teeth..'

Clean grinding surfaces by punching the bristles vertically into the grooves and the pits.


Now clean tongue surfaces in the some meticulous manner, two teeth at a time. This action is shown on teeth in lower arch.

6. Repeat the whole procedure in lower orch.


In a narrow arch it may be necessary to use only the brush tip to clean tongue surface of incisor teeth.

How to brush where tooth has been lost.

Correct and incorrect application of the brush. Notice in the incorrect diagram that the bristles of the brush ere on the tooth but do not cover the gum margin.

Correct and incorrect application of brush to cheek surfaces and molar teeth. The correct diagram shows the bristles of the brush passing in between the teeth.


*

mmm

LEARNING TO CHEW The best rusk is an oven-baked finger of wholemeal bread

Diversion not denial is the rule for a successful programme of dental decay prevention with children. The child here is being offered an attractively rosy apple to take his attention from the sweetmeat he was about to devour, and so to divert his interest.


DIVERSION NOT DENIAL

So much of the success of this programme of caries (tooth decay) prevention depends upon the early establishment of good food habits.

In this respect, remember that diversion of food habits away from sugar, to dentally harmless and more beneficial foods, is much to be preferred to unreasoned denial.

The child denied sugar will surely eat the forbidden food whenever opportunity presents. The child diverted to other attractive foods will prefer them to sugar.

Remember diversion is better than Denial.

WHY DO WE NEED AN EGG A DAY?

Eggs are very rich sources of certain body building materials—Protein. Vitamins A and D and Mineral salts. They contain Fats for energy, Calcium and Phosphorus for bone and teeth development. Vitamins A, B. B2 and D; and, perhaps most important of all, are very rich in Iron. This fact renders an egg per day essential to a woman during pregnancy as the drain on her Iron reserves is severe; particularly in the latter months of pregnancy when the infant lays in a store of Iron to tide it over the period during which its only food source is milk. Milk, it should be remembered, contains no Iron.

THE IMPORTANCE OF LEARNING TO CHEW

From the time the front teeth erupt, a baby should be taught and encouraged to use them. It is only by chewing vigorously that correct growth and development of the dental arches and their surrounding tissues can be effected. Correct chewing habits on the correct foods are strongly advised in assisting prevention of dental decay. Foods which have a coarse or fibrous quality are admirable in this regard.

One of the first foods introduced to the baby to encourage chewing is the rusk The tendency today is to buy these rusks, a practice which is

expensive and generally not advisable as they are sweetened by the addition of a sugar preparation. The best rusks for the child are oven-baked fingers of wholemeal bread, with a smear of butter on them. Chop bones are also very useful and are well received by baby, particularly if a little meat is left adhering to the bone. Young children must be supervised when eating a rusk as they may bite off too much and consequently choke.

A PARTIAL DENTURE

Take special care if a partial denture is worn. Food will collect between the denture and the natural teeth after eating. If food is not carefully removed from both denture and teeth, decay will result and the gums will become inflamed. Correctly designed metal clasps on the dentures do not injure the other teeth, but food allowed to remain on them will definitely cause decay.

ICE BLOCKS

These can be made simply by saving juice from fruit stewed without sugar. (Always use ripe fruit if possible.) Add saccharine (V4 grain = 1 heaped teaspoonful of sugar) if fruit is not ripe. Color with vegetable colorings and place in ice-tray of refrigerator.

Chopped fresh fruit may be added for interest.

Type of Food


FOODS AND THEIR VALUE

Value

To

build up

new

t i s

sue irr

the

young, and to

re-

pair

the wear

and

tear

of tissue

in

both

young

and

old.

Heat and energy.


Source


MILH

EGGS

)0


KIDNEY MEAT LIVER

DRIED BEANS DRIED PEAS

o&fose

o<>c0o °01°o °cP

OO °J?cP


(Starch and Sugar)

Fots


Heat and energy.


WHOLEMEAL BREAD

PORRIDGE

MILK

NUTS


Vitamins


LIVER VEGETABLES    BUTTER

To ensure bodily health, and assist resistance to disease.

To build ar.d maintain teeih and bones, and to keep blood pure.

To replace that lost from the body by e x c r e tion, through the skin as p e r s piration, and from lungs as water vapor.

food

rules

FOR GOOD HEALTH

A well-balanced diet is necessary for the health of the whole body, including the gums and the teeth. In fact, disturbed states of general health, due to dietary deficiencies, are often first seen in the soft tissues of the mouth.

The chief constituents of food are Carbohydrates, Proteins, Fats, Minerals, Vitamins and Water.

THE ROLE OF CARBOHYDRATES

These are represented by sugar and starch. Starch consists of complex sugar groups, which in the process of digestion are broken down into their simple components.

Carbohydrates are the main source of energy for the body. Australians generally consume far too much sugar and white flour. Drastic reduction in the consumption of these highly refined products is most desirable since their use displaces other essential nutrients. The tempo of modern life, together with its increasing mechanisation and decreasing physical activity, has increased the need for nutrients and at the same time decreased the need for energy foods. These factors must be considered together with the fact that many modern methods of food processing have markedly decreased the nutrient value of the natural products.

In the suggested diet charts in this booklet, it will be noted that wholemeal flour is recommended in place of white flour. This is because in the refining process, with consequent removal of the bran and germ of the wheat, one half of the Calcium is lost, together with four-fifths of the Iron. In the milling process most of the Vitamin content is also lost.

Excessive amounts of fermentable Carbohydrates (sugars» cause dental decay. The diets recommended reduce these to the minimum, at the same time ensuring that nutritional requirements are met.

WHY DO WE EAT MEAT?

The main function of Protein is to build up new tissue in the growing child and to repair the wear and tear of tissue in both young and old. Protein is available from two sources, animal and vegetable. Of these two the Protein requiring the least effort on the part of the body to effect repair on new tissue is that of animal origin In effect we require less animal than vegetable Protein to achieve the same result.

The best Proteins are obtained from milk, eggs and glandular tissue such as kidney and liver, but meat, fish and cheese are also rich in animal Protein.

The following are good substitutes for meat: —

1.    Cheese—in sandwiches or melted on toast or in savories. It may be grated over salads in summer, and served with spaghetti or cauliflower in winter.

2.    Eggs, served in any form.

3.    Dried peas and beans—most beneficial when milk is used at the same meal.

4.    Fish. Cheap fish has just as much food value as the dearer varieties. Flavorings can be used to improve the taste of such fish as barracouta, salmon and mullet.

The cheaper cuts of meat have just as high a Protein value and are just as tasty if cooked more slowly to make them more tender.

Some races, e.g., the Eskimos, who live principally on a flesh diet, have excellent teeth, yet when they live in contact with civilisation and have access to refined Carbohydrates, their teeth rapidly deteriorate.

WHAT IS THE VALUE OF FAT?

Fats, like Carbohydrates, are essentially energy producing foods; in fact, weight for weight, they have two and a quarter times the energy value of Carbohydrates and Protein. Fat in excess of requirements may retard digestion of other foods and also be stored in the body as fatty tissue, leading to overweight.

In addition to meat, such foods as milk, cheese and nuts also contribute Fat to the diet.

WHAT ARE THE VITAMINS?

Vitamins are complex chemical substances which are essential for the maintenance of health. Without them we do not remain healthy, children do not grow, and repair of body tissue is handicapped.

Vitamins occur as fat or water-soluble substances. some susceptible to heat, others to oxidation—which simply means they are readily destroyed. In order to preserve, or at least to keep their loss to a minimum, the directions given in this booklet for cooking should be carefully observed.

It may be stated that, in. general, the more refined a food becomes, the more processes it has to pass through before it is acceptable to our advertisement-cultivated, twentieth century palates, the less Vitamin remains in the final product, unless it is artificially added at a later date. Perhaps the most outstanding examples of this are seen in those products which result from the refining and processing of Carbohydrate foods Cane sugar, when pronounced fit for human consumption, contains neither Vitamins nor Minerals, while white flour products retain only a very small fraction of their Vitamin and Mineral content.

These foods are the result of a belief, formed in early dietetic research, that the calorific value of foods was all important. Since this original concept we have come to realise that eating Carbohydrates without Vitamins or Minerals is a dangerous practice. Contrary to popular belief, white flour and cane sugar are not superior products. It is true that they represent a pinnacle and triumph of modern ingenuity, but dietetically speaking they emphasise Calories only; the vital factors referred to previously have been carefully milled out of the final product. These two foods cannot maintain life in laboratory animals, so how can they be expected to maintain human life?

A number of the Vitamins are necessary for oral health. Vitamins A, C and D are necessary for the development of the teeth; while Vitamins A. B and C deficiencies are reflected by changes in the soft tissues of the mouth. Scurvy, for example, prevalent on board ship years ago when supplies of fresh vegetables and fruit ran short, gave rise to bleeding, painful gums and loosening of the teeth.

As with the Minerals, there is no evidence that extra supplies of Vitamins above the daily requirements of a well-balanced diet will ensure freedom from decay.

WHY DO WE NEED MINERALS?

Minerals are just as essential for the growth and well-being of an individual as Vitamins, Proteins or Calories. It is important to realise here that neither Fats nor Carbohydrates supply minerals; our best sources of Minerals are Proteins and vegetables.

While many Minerals are required in only minute doses, which are readily available in a normal diet, the more common ones are sometimes the hardest to acquire in sufficient quantity, particularly if such foods as milk and vegetables are not included in the diet in sufficient quantities—this applies particularly to the growing child. Calcium and Phosphorus are essential for the proper formation of teeth, but the excessive intake of these Minerals above normal requirements will not render teeth immune to decay.__

WHY DO WE DRINK WATER?

Water is such a commonplace item in our diet that we are prone to overlook its vital value. Without a proper fluid intake the body rapidly

BANANAS

Natures Perfect Fruit-Food

vigorous health


Bananas

with

custard or

The Banana is the one fruit-food which alone will sustain life.

Use Bananas in salads and for cooking.

junket . . . the quickest and tastiest dessert.

BANANA JIM FULL OF VIM


Ripe Bananas build and tone the system.

Three Bananas and a glass of Milk make the perfect light meal.

Fry Bananas in the pan with chops, sausages or fish.

For valuable free recipe booklet write to Box 1123, G.P.O., Melbourne


The BANANA is a VALUED PROTECTIVE FOOD . . . guards your health.

Bananas for mothers & children

Slice Bananas into the morning cereal — delicious and highly nutritious.

“Serve Bancmas every day In a new and dainty way”

Invaluable for nursing mothers, children, athletes and people of all ages.

Bananas tor all the lamil.v

Breakfast should be a real break fast. Make it nutritious, adequate, attractive and appetising.

BALANCED MEALS FOR HEALTH

It is important that breakfast, the first meal of the day, should be nutritious and satisfying. Fresh fruit, in season, should always be included in the menu, and children should be encouraged to drink as much milk as possible. For the main dish serve grilled tomatoes on toast, bacon or eggs either boiled, poached or scrambled.

School lunches may be made attractive and palatable with a little care and imagination. Always cut sandwiches from wholemeal bread, use butter liberally and introduce some fresh salad item such as grated lettuce or carrot. Peanut butter, sultanas, cheese, tomato, chopped nuts or egg make nutritious fillings.

Dinner, the main meal of the day, should always include a protein rich food such as fish or meat. Make sure that fresh vegetables, either cooked or in salad form, figure prominently on the menu. Fresh or stewed fruit served with egg custard or ice cream will provide a nourishing and easily prepared dessert.

Pictured above are the ingredients for a nourishing and balanced lunch for the schoolgoing child.

Rich in vitamins the dinner pictured here features fresh salad served with the main meat dish.


Marmite

serve


ere simple and easy to prepare when you keep a pot of MARMITE handyand houi the children loti» its tnntty flavour!


TASTY PICNIC SANDWICHES


MID-MORNING SNACKS


MARMITE

VEGETABLE EXTRACT


ENERGY-RICH SCHOOL LUNCHES


for healthy oui-door appetilies are made in a twinkling with tasty economical MARMITE!


for the busy housewife are much more nourishing when you make them with appetising, vitamin-rich H-ARM IT El


A S an aid to speedy, patient recovery there is nothing to equal vitamin-rich MARMITE! Specified by Army Medical Units in thousands of cases of malnutrition, tliis highly concentrated vegetable extract stimulates the appetite, acts beneficially on


the nervous system and provides much needed nourishment in a readily-assimilated form. Equally valuable to elderly folk and the very young, MARM11E can he served as a tempting bouillon by adding hot water . . . or spread on bread and butter.


shows signs of deterioration, most distressing symptoms ensue and in extreme cases death may be the result.

Water is most necessary to life, and children should be encouraged from an early age to drink plenty of water.


Water is necessary to replace that lost from the body by excretion, through the skin as perspiration and from the lungs as water vapor The amount required varies owing to the influence of many factors, e.g., humidity and work. However, thirst usually serves as an adequate guide to the amount to be consumed. The exceptions, of course, are sick persons and infants.

The drinking of heavily sweetened tea has become an Australian institution—not only at meal times but also at mid-morning and midafternoon “breaks.” This is a definite dental hazard. Cocoa and proprietary drinks with a chocolate base are often consumed last thing at night, without cleaning the teeth or rinsing the mouth before retiring. Such habits should be caretully watched to safeguard the teeth.

For children, water and milk are ideal beverages. Prohibition of sweetened drinks is essential to enable them to retain a full complement of teeth.

THE VALUE OF MILK TO CHILDREN

The importance of milk must be stressed, for in it are found Protein, Fat, Carbohydrate. Vitamins A and B, Calcium and Phosphorus, in a form easily digested. One pint daily given to a five-year-old child supplies 75 per cent, of his required Vitamin B2, 70 per cent, of his Calcium, 38 per cent, of his Protein, 35 per cent, of his Vitamins A and Bl, and 25 per cent, of his Calories.

Children from three to thirteen years of age require two pints of milk daily to ensure full growth and development.

CONCLUSION

All of these nutrients, Carbohydrates, Fats, Minerals, and Vitamins have been carefully balanced in the dietaries in this booklet. It must be explained, however, that they have been designed to meet the normal requirements of average individuals. They are not meant to take the place of special diets prescribed by physicians for special cases. They are meant to safeguard the general health, and especially the dental health, of the average Australian.


These foods should occur daily in the diet: —

MILK

One pint for adults.

Two pints for children.

Cheese if possible.

FRUITS

One serve of tomatoes, or citrus fruits, or their juices.

Other raw fruit, canned or dried, one serving.

VEGETABLES

Potatoes, at least one daily.

A green or yellow vegetable every day.

At least one other vegetable.

CEREALS

One wholegrain cereal, if possible with some wheat germ added.

Whole wheat bread; four to six slices.

PROTEIN FOODS

Meat or fish once a day.

Liver or kidney twice weekly.

Eggs, preferably one daily.

FATS

Butter, at least eight ounces a week.

For children, cod-liver oil, one or two teaspoons daily, particularly during winter.


-    - - - -_-ri==-- r-

SUNDAY

Breakfast

Dinner

Tea

.

Sliced Bananas .

1 1 2

Shoulder Mutton

. 2 slices

Cheese.....

. .. 2 slices

Sultanas . .

1 dessert-

Roast Potato . . .

. 2 pieces

Lettuce.....

... 2 leaves

spoon

Beans ........

. 2 table-

Pineapple . .. .

... 4 slice

Baked Flaked Oat-

spoons

Grated Carrot

. .. 1V2 table-

meal (cold) ..

1 oz.

Silver Beet.....

. 14 table-

spoons

Milk . ..

2 3 cup

spoons

Bread ......

. .. 24 slices

Grilled Tomato ..

2

Pineapple.....

. 2 slices

Butter

on Toast......

14 slices

Milk Drink.....

. 1 glass

Vegemite .. . .

.. Vs teaspoon

Milk ........

1 glass

Milk .....

. .. 1 glass

Carrot........

2 oz.

Supper

4 O'clock

Pear .

4

Milk Drink......

. 1 glass

Calories for

the day, 2472

MONDAY

Breakfast

Sandwich Lunch

Dinner

Stewed Peaches .

. 2

Wholemeal Bread

6

slices

Sausages (grilled) .

3

Wheatgerm . .. .

. 1 dessert-

Butter

Salad (lettuce, po-

spoon

Cold Mutton . . .

1

slice

tato, tomato.

Grilled Bacon . . .

. 2 rashers

Dates (minced) ..

1

table-

beetroot, cucum-

on Toast.....

. 2 slices

spoon

ber)

Milk .....

. 1 glass

Milk Drink .

1

glass

Watermelon

Pear.........

. %

Apple..........

1

(sliced) ......

Milk ......

6 ozs.

1 glass

Supper

Home Lunch

4 O'clock

Pear .......

Vs

Cold Mutton . . .

Salad.........

Milk Drink......

1

glass

Calories for the

day, 2569

TUESDAY

Breakfast

Santlicich Lunch

Dinner

Stewed Apple .. .

. 14

Wholemeal Bread .

6

slices

Steak (minced cas-

Wheatgerm . .. .

. 1 dessert-

Butter

serole) ..

4

ozs.

spoon

Brains..........

1

set

Potato (mashed) . .

2

table-

Poached Egg

1

Honey

1

dspn.

spoons

on Toast......

. 2 slices

and Grated Carrot

1

dspn.

Cabbage (raw) . ..

1

table-

Milk..........

, 1 glass

Milk Drink......

1

glass

spoon

Pear..........

, %

Tomato........

1

small

Apple Tart < short

crust) ........

5

ozs.

Milk ........

1

glass

Supper

Home Lunch

4 O'clock

Peach .......

1

Brains on Toast ,

Milk Drink .. ..

1

glass

Calories for the

day, 2505

Breakfast

Sandwich Lunch

Dinner

Grilled Cheese . .

. 2 slices

Wholemeal Bread

6 slices

Baked Rabbit .

. .. 1 leg

on Toast.....

. 1 slice

Butter

Baked Potato .

... 2 pieces

Toast.........

. 1 % slices

Egg ........

1

Beans .......

... 2 table-

Butter

Vegemite.....

Vz teaspoon

Silver Beet .. .

spoons

. .. lVz table-

Vegemite

and Carrot .. ..

1 dessert-

Milk ........

. 1 glass

spoon

Junket . ,

spoons

Carrot ......

. 1 oz.

Lettuce ......

% head

. .. 1V2 cups

Milk Drink......

1 glass

and Apricots

... 4 halves

Carrot .......

y2

Milk

. .. 1 glass

Home Lunch

Supper

Poached Egg on

4 O'clock

Sultana Grapes

1 bunch

Toast

Milk Drink......

1 glass

Calories for

the day. 2474

THURSDAY

Breakfast

Santhcich Lunch

Dinner

Stewed Apricots .

3

Wholemeal Bread

6

slices

Bacon (grilled) . .

lVz rashers

Lamb’s Fry • • ..

2

slices

Butter

Salad (lettuce, po-

and Bacon .. ..

IV2 rashers

Cheese........

2

slices

tato, tomato, beet-

Toast ........

2

slices

Honey ........

1

dessert-

root, carrot) , .

Butter

spoon

Loganberries .. ..

Va CUP

Milk .........

1

glass

and Grated Carrot

t

dessert-

in Jelly......

V2 cup

Lettuce........

2

leaves

spoon

Custard ......

V2 cup

Milk Drink......

1

glass

Milk .......

1 glass

Tomato ......

1

Supper

Home Lunch

4 O'clock

Sultana Grapes

1 bunch

Spaghetti on Toast

Milk Drink......

Ì

glass

Calories for the

day, 2518

FRIDAY

Breakfast

Santlwich Lunch

Dinner

Stewed Prunes . ..

6

Wholemeal Bread

6

slices

Fish or Meat Ris-

Boiled Egg .....

1

Butter

soles . .

2

Toast .......

2

slices

Tomato

1

Potatoes (fried chip)

1 large

Butter

Peanut Butter and

potato

Milk..........

1

glass

Sultanas .. .

1

dessert-

Silver Beet

1 tablespoon

Plum..........

1

spoon

Tomato Sliced Raw'

1

Lettuce ......

y4

Fresh Bananas .

iy2

Milk Drink......

1

glass

with Ice Cream

Small serve

Tomato ......

1

small

Milk

1 glass

Slipper

Home Lunch

4 O’clock

Apricot

1

Whitebait on Toast

Milk Drink......

1

glass

Calories tor the

day, 2590

SATURDAY

Breakfast

Sliced Fresh

Dinner

Grilled Chops . . ..

iy2

Tea

Sw'eetcorn on Cob .

IV2 table-

Peaches

IV2

Jacket Potato ,. ..

1

spoons

Milk .

y2 cup

Beans .. ..

iy2 table-

or on Toast .. ..

1 slice

Grilled Sausages .

2

spoons

Bread ........

2 slices

and Tomato ..

1

Tomato (sliced raw)

1

Butter

Toast .....

2 slices

Lemon Blancmange

1 serve

Cheese...... ..

1 slice

Peanut Butter .. ..

1 dessert-

Milk Drink

1 glass

Apple .........

1

spoon

Celerv .....

y> stalk

Milk ........

1 glass

Milk .........

Apricot........

1 glass 1

4 O'cloi'k

Milk Drink . .

1 glass

Supper

Apricot . . . . Calories for the

1

day. 2487

SUNDAY

ISrcuUfust

Oinncr

Tea

Tomatoes Grilled

i y2

Roast Beef . . ..

.. 2 slices

Cold Beef ... .

2 slices

with Cheese . ..

1 slice

Roast Potato ..

.. 2 pieces

Salad (lettuce, to-

on Toast .....

1 slice

Roast Parsnip . .

. . 1

mato, potato, rad-

Toast ........

, 1 slice

Peas ......

.. 2 table-

ish, beetroot» .

Butter

spoons

Fresh Pineapple ..

lx2 slices

Vegemite......

, V2 teaspoon

Fruit Salad . . ..

.. 1 cup

Custard........

% cup

Milk..........

1 glass

Top Milk . . ..

. . 13 cup

Milk .......

1 glass

Apple..........

. y2

Milk Drink . . . .

.. 1 glass

Supper

Grapes........

1 bunch

4 O'clock

Milk Drink .. ..

.. 1 glass

Calories for the

day, 2481

MONDAY

fireakiust

Santlicicli

Lunch

Dinner

Stewed Quinces . .

,. lb.

Wholemeal

Bread .

6

slices

Macaroni Cheese

IV2 table-

Wheatgerm . .

. 1 dessert-

Butter

Potato ( mashed) ..

spoons

spoon

Cold Beef

1

slice

lv2 table-

Scrambled Egg . . with Tomato . .

1

Tomato

1

spoons

; %

Milk Drink

1

glass

Tomato .......

1

on Toast.....

. 1 slice

Grapes . .

1

bunch

Prunes .......

10

Milk.........

Apple .......

. 1 glass

. V2

and Custard . .. Milk ......

12 cup 1 glass

Supper

Home Lunch

Cold Beef Garden Salad

4 O'clock

Milk Drink

1

glass

Apple..........

Calories for the

V2

day, 2571

TUESDAY

iSreakfttsi

Rolled Oats, Poi

ridge.......

Honey.......

Milk    .

Fried Vegetables on Toast

Milk    ...

Pear    •

Home Lunch

Cold Black Pudding Salad


. 1 oz.

. 1 dessertspoon . 2/3 cup . % lb.

. 1 slice . 1 glass . %


Sontlwit'll Lunch

Wholemeal Bread . 6 slices Butter

Blackpudding .    .. 3 slices

and Lettuce ... 2 leaves

Cheese .....1 slice

and Apple .. .. %

Milk Drink...... 1 glass

Tomato ...... 1 small


Oinncr

Baked Rabbit .. . . 1 leg and Bacon ..    .1    rasher

Baked Jacket Potato 1 Carrots and Parsley 2 tablespoons

Custard........ 1    serve

with Raisins ... 1 dessertspoon

Milk......... 1    glass


Supper

Apple......... Vs.

Calories for the day, 2615


Breakfast

Sandwich Lunch

Dinner

Flaked Oatmeal

Wholemeal Bread .

6

slices

Grilled Sausages .

2

•uncooked) ..

.. 1 oz.

Butter

Salad (lettuce, po-

Bananas ......

.. 1V2

Scrambled Egg

1

tato, tomato, beet-

Milk........

.. 2/3 cup

and Parsley .. ..

root, carrot)

Mince........

.. IV2 tbspns.

Sultanas ......

1

dessert-

Bananas ........

IV2

on Toast .. ..

.. 2 slices

spoon

and Junket .. ..

1 cup

Butter ......

Milk Drink......

1

glass

Grapes........

v2 bunch

Vegemite .. ..

.. % teaspoon

Apple ......

1

Milk ........

1 glass

Milk .....

Apple ......

.. 1 glass

.. V2

Supper

Home Lunch

4 O'clods

Grapes ......

1 bunch

Scrambled Eggs,

Toast

Milk Drink......

1

glass

Calories lor the

day, 2503

THURSDAY

Breakfast

Sandwich

Lunch

Dinner

Lamb’s Fry.....

2 slices

Wholewheat

Bis-

Co ned Beef ..

2 slices

and Bacon ,. ..

1 rasher

cuits . .

6

Boiled Potatoes ..

1 large

Raw Tomato .. ..

%

Butter

Carrots .

lVs table-

Toast ........

2 slices

Tomato . . .

1

small

spoons

Butter

Lettuce .. .

%

Silver Beet ..

IQ table-

Honey........

1 dessert-

Cheese .. .

2

slices

spoons

spoon

Milk . . .

1

glass

Stewed Quinces .

1

Milk ........

1 glass

Grapes . . .

1

bunch

Custard .....

P cup

Quince ........

Vo

Milk ......

1 glass

Home Lunch

Supper

4 O'clock

Pear

1/y

Salad

Milk Drink

1

glass

Calories lor the

day. 2477

FRIDAY

Breakfast

Wheatnuts (cooked)

1 oz.

Sandwich

Wholemeal

Lunch

Bread

6 slices

Dinner

Cold Corned Beef

2 slices

Milk . Poached Egg

2/3 cup 1

Butter

Cheese

2 slices

or Steamed Fish . Mashed Potatoes

2 fillets 2 tbspns.

on Toast

1 slice

Dates

1 dspn.

Grated Cabbage.Raw 1 tbspn

with Raw Tomato

v>

Chopped Nuts . ..

1 teaspn.

Tomato, Raw

1

Milk..........

1 glass

Lettuce

14

Fruit Mince Tart

Apple . . . ..

\L

Milk Drink

1 glass

(wholemeal) . .

1 serve

Apple

1

Top Milk . . . .

1/3 cup

Home Lunch

Sandwiches as Sandwich Lunch.

4 O'clock

Milk Drink

1 glass

Milk

Supper

Apple

Calories for the

1 glass

l/2

day. 2681

SATURDAY

Breakfast

Dinner

Tea

Stewed Pears

. . IV2

Steak (minced top-

Baked Beans .. ..

2 tbspns.

Kidneys .. ..

. . 2

side) . ..

14 lb.

with Parsley .. ..

on Toast . . .

. 1 slice

Raw Cabbage .

IV2 tbspns.

on Toast ..

IV2 slices

Toast ....

.. 2 slices

Raw Tomato

1

Stewed Rhubarb

2 stalks

Butter

Boiled Potato in

and Custard ....

V2 cup

Peanut Butter .

. . 1 dspn

Jacket

1

Milk .....

1 glass

Milk .......

.. 1 glass

Baked Queen Cus-

Carrot......

I'

tard

Milk Drink .....

1 glass

Supper

Grapes .....

4 O'clock

14 lb.

Apple ......

Vi

Milk Drink

1 glass

Calories tor the

day, 2070

SDN1IAY

Breakfast

Dinner

Tea

Wheat Porridge

1

oz.

Shoulder Mutton

2 slices

Potato Soup .

1 cup

Milk .

3

ozs.

Roast Potato .. .

. 2 pieces

Macaroni Cheese

2’2 tbspns.

Fried Apple Rings

1

small

Cauliflower.....

. 1V2 tbspn.

Toast

1 slice

in Bacon......

1

oz.

Peas ......

. 1 tbspn.

Carrot

1

Toast ........

1

slice

Rhubarb.......

. 3 tbspns.

Wholemeal Scones

4

Butter

Pastry .....

. 1 slice

Butter

Milk

1

glass

Custard .....

. 1/2 cup

Milk ......

1 glass

Apple..........

]/i

Milk Drink.....

. 1 glass

Supper

Applp . . .

1L

4 O'clock

Milk Drink . . .

1 glass

Calories for the

day. 2676


MONDAY

Breakfast

Santlwiclt Lunch

Wheat Porridge

1 oz.

Wholemeal Bread .

6

slices

Milk .

.. 3 ozs.

Mutton .

1

lge. slice

Grilled Cheese .

. . 1 oz.

Egg • • ■

1

on Toast ..

.. 1 slice

Dates Mashed . .

1

oz

Toast .....

. . 1 slice

Apple .....

1

Butter

Milk Drink .....

1

glass

Vegemite

Milk .....

.. 1 glass

Apple . ..

Dome Lunch

4 O'clock

Mutton Fritters

Milk Drink . .

1

glass


Dinner

3 tbspns.

1

1'2 tbspns. 2 tbspns. 1V2 pears 1 cup

1 glass


Shepherd’s Pie . . Jacket Potato . . Spinach    .. .

Cauliflower .. . Stewed Pears .. .

Junket .....

Milk    .....

Supper

Apple    . . u2

Calories for the day. 2619

TUESDAY

Sandwich Lunch


Wholemeal Bread 6    slices

Apple and Vegemite V% apple Apple    . .. Vi apple-

and Celery .. .. ’4 stalk

Banana ...... 1

Apple     1

Milk Drink ..... 1    glass


Dinner

Corned Beef .. .. 2 slices Boiled Potato    1

Carrot    1 tbspn.

Cabbage (shredded) 1 tbspn Steamed Date Pudding    1 serve

Top Milk.....’4 cup

Milk ...... 1 glass


Dome Lunch

Toasted Banana Sandwiches


4 O'clock

Milk Drink    1 glass


Supper

Pear    M>


Breakfast

Sandwich Lunch

Dinner

Oatmeal Porridge

1 oz.

Wholemeal Bread .

6 slices

Casserole Rabbit .

1 leg

Milk . ..

3 ozs.

Corned Beef . . ..

1 slice

and Bacon .. ..

1 oz.

Scrambled Egg .

1

Cheese .. ..

V2 oz.

Potato ......

1

and Parsley on

and Pear .....

!4 pear

Cauliflower .. ..

TV? tbspns.

Toast........

1 slice

Peanut Butter . ..

1 teaspn.

Sauce .....

1 tbspn.

Milk..........

1 glass

and Dates .. ..

1 dspn.

Baked Custard ..

lu2 cups

Pear..........

y2

Pear ......

1

and Sultanas .

1 dspn.

Milk Drink......

1 glass

Milk ......

1 glass

Supper

Home Lunch

4 O'clock

Pear ......

■/2

Brains on Toast

Milk Drink......

1 glass

Calories for the

day, 2734

THURSDAY

Breakfast

Sandwich Lunch

Dinner

Wheat Porridge ..

1 oz.

Wholemeal Bread .

6 slices

Tomato Soup .. ..

1 cup

Milk ..

3 ozs.

Spaghetti and

Stewed Steak .. . .

L lb

Brains . .

1 set

Tomato . . ..

1 tbspn.

Boiled Potato

1

and Parsley Sauce

Banana .. ..

1

Carrots and Mint

2 tbsnns.

on Toast . .

1 slice

Rabbit and Parsley

Vs leg

Silver Beet

1 tbspn

Milk

1 glass

%

Orange ......

1

Sliced Orange . .. Custard ......

IV,

Apple .....

Milk Drink......

1 glass

11 cup

Milk ......

1 glass

Home Lunch

Supper

Cauliflower and Cheese in Sauce

4 O'clock

Apple

1/,

on Toast

Milk Drink......

1 glass

Calories for the

day, 2664

FRIDAY

Breakfast

Sandwich Lunch

Dinner

Wheat Porridge

1 oz.

Wholemeal Bread .

6 slices

Liver and Gravy

3 slices

Milk . .

.. 3 ozs

Cheese .. ..

V2 oz.

or Grilled Fish

Vi lb.

Fried Banana .

.. 1

and Apple .. ..

Vi apple

Mashed Potato . . .

2 tbspns.

and Bacon ..

.. 1 oz

Dates ......

1 dspn.

Boiled Celery

2 stalks

Toast . ..

.. 2 slices

and Nuts......

1 teaspn.

Apple and Rhubarb

Butter

Beans ........

IV2 dspns.

Tart (wholemeal

Peanut Butter .

.. 1 dspn.

Pear .......

1

paste)........

7 ozs.

Milk . . . .

.. 1 glass

Milk Drink......

1 glass

Milk .......

1 glass

Carrot . ..

.. v4

Supper

Home lAinch

4 O'clock

Apple ...

l/{?

Beans on Toast

Milk Drink......

1 glass

Calories tor the

day. 2590

SATURDAY

Breakfast

Dinner

Tea

Oatmeal Porridge

1 oz.

Grilled Steak .

.. 14 lb.

Tripe.......

• • • 1 tbspn.

Milk ........

3 ozs.

Boiled Potato .

.. 1

Onions.....

.. M

Sausage .......

1

Pumpkin .

.. 2 pieces

Bacon.....

.. 1 oz.

Toast ........

2 slices

Cream of Rice

.. 2 tbspns.

Potato .....

.. 1

Butter

Sultanas.....

.. 1 dspn.

Parsley

White Sauce .

Vegemite

Cplery .. ..

.. 2 tbspns.

Milk ........

1 glass

Milk Drink

1 glass

Bread . Fresh Orange .

.. 2 slices . . . 1

Celery.......

Vi stalk

Milk

■ . . 1 glass

4 O'clock

Supper

Pear

l/o

Milk Drink .

1 glass

Calories for

the day. 2590

SUNDAY
MONDAY

Breakfast



Sandwich Lunch

Wholemeal Bread 6 slices Cold Beef    .. 1 slice

Banana ...... 1

Cheese    .. .. 1 slice

and Apple .. .. %

Apple    ..    .. 1

Milk Drink ...    .1    glass


Oinner


Vegetable Soup ... 1 cup Oxtail    ..    ..    14 tail

Boiled Potatoes    ..    1

Carrots    ... 2 tbspns.

Stewed Prunes .10

Rycena ......1    tbspn.

Milk .......1    glass


Supper

Apple ....... ’2

Calories for the day, 2572


Home Lunch

Cold Beef Potatoes (boiled in iacket)


4 O'clock

Milk Drink .....1 glass


TUESDAY

Breakfast

Oatmeal Porridge 1 oz.


Raisins

Milk ........ 1 glass

Fresh Pear...... 1


Milk    •    3 ozs.

Kidneys    •    2

and Parsley

on Toast .....1 slice

Milk .......1 glass

Orange .......V2


Santlwicli Lunch

Wholemeal Bread . 6    slices

Brains    1    set

and Nuts

Wholewheat wafers 2 Vegemite

Orange ...... 1

Milk Drink .....1    glass


Dinner

Oxtail Soup.....1 cup

Sheep’s Tongue 1 Parsley Sauce Steamed Potato 1 Cabbage. Silver Beet 2 tbspns. Macaroni Custard . Da cups


Breakfast

Oinner

Tea

Wheatnuts

1 oz.

Roast Topside Beef

3 slices

Spaghetti, Cheese,

baked in oven

Roast Potato

2 pieces

Tomato Sauce

3

tbspns.

moistened with

Roast Parsnip . . .

2 pieces

Toast . .

1

slice

milk

3 ozs.

Sprouts .. ..

5

Cold Minced Tart

1

slice

and crude molas-

Baked Apple .. ..

1

Milk

1

glass

ses

1 . teaspn.

Custard .....

1 3 cup

Toast

1 slice

Milk Drink .....

1 glass

Butter

Dates (minced)

1 dspn

Supper

Milk ......

Celery .......

1 glass M stalk

4 O'clock

Apple ......

Milk Drink .....

1 glass

Calories for the

day, 3077

Supper

Home Lunch

Oxtail on toast


Apple.......... ts

Breakfast

Sandwich Lunch

Dinner

Wheat Porridge .

. 1 oz.

Wholemeal ’Bread

6 slices

Vegetable Milk

Milk .. .

. 3 ozs.

Scrambled Egg . ..

1

Soup .

1 cup

Fried Potato .. .

. 1

and Parsley . ..

Stuffed Flank Steak

% lb.

and Parsley

Carrot .. ..

l/0

Jacket Potato . . . .

2 pieces

Toast .......

. 2 slices

and Honey .. ..

1 teaspn.

Marrow .. ..

2 pieces

Butter

Sheep’s Tongue ..

%

Dried Stewed

Vegemite

Orange ......

1

Apricots......

6

Milk .......

. 1 glass

Milk Drink......

1 glass

Custard

Orange .......

y0

Milk ........

1 glass

Sumter

Home Lunch

4 O'clock

Pear .......

Vo

Scrambled Egg

Milk Drink......

1 glass

Calories for the

day, 2737

THURSDAY

Brettkfast

Wheat Porridge .

. 1

oz.

Milk .. .

. 3

ozs.

Fried Brains ..

. . 1

set

and Parsley Toast.........

. 2

slices

Butter

Marmalade.....

. 1

dspn

Milk ........

. 1

glass

Pear ......

. Vo

Home Lunch

Lamb’s Fry


Oinnor


Pea Soup......l cup

Irish Stew......yt lb.

Mashed Potato ... 1 Cauliflower    .... 2 tbspns.

Apple Pie    3 tbspns.

(wholemeal crust) 1 slice Milk    ...... l glass

Supper

Pear ....... y2


Sandwich Lunch


Wholemeal Bread 6 slices Liver and Vegemite 2 slices

Dates .    .....1 dspn.

Stuffed Steak .. .. V8 lb. (minced)

Pear    ......1

Milk Drink...... l glass


4 O'clock

Milk Drink...... 1 glass


Calories for the day, 2786


FRIDAY

Breakfast

Oatmeal Porridge .    1 oz.

Milk.........3    ozs.

Cheese ......1    oz.

on Toast......2    slices

Milk..........1    glass

Apple.......... y2


Home i^unch

As Sandwich Lunch—toasted


Santlicieh Lunch

Wholemeal Bread 6 slices Cheese    . .. 1 oz.

and Sultanas .. 1 dspn

Apple .....!4

and Celery .. .. % stalk Peanut Butter ... 1 teaspn. and Dates .... 1 teaspn.

Apple    ...... l

Milk Drink...... 1 glass

4 O'clock

Milk Drink...... 1 glass


Dinner

Tomato Soup    .    1 cup

Fish or Beef    Rolls    % lb

Potato Chips    .    .    . .    1 large

Spinach .....2 tbspns.

Hot Banana    ..    ..    1

Custard......l cup

Milk .......l glass

Supper

Apple ........ y2

Calories for the day, 2535


SATURDAY

Breakfast

Wheatnut Wafers . 6 Butter

Peanut Butter ...    1 tbspn.

Sultanas......1    dspn.

Milk .........1    glass

Orange........y2


Ditiner


Steak and Kidney 4 ozs.

Pie..........1 slice

pastry

Boiled Jacket

Potato........ 1

Carrot .    .... .. 5    sticks

Rhubarb .. ......3    tbspns

Junket........1    cup


Tea


Potato Soup .. ..    1 cup

Saveloys .....3

Tomato Sauce

Silver Beet ... 1 tbspn. Potato    . .    l

Bread and Butter

Apple Slice...... 1 slice

Milk    ......l glass

Supper

Apple .....y.


SUNDAY

Breakfast

Baked Wheatnuts Sliced Banana Sultanas • ■ ■ Milk . . . Toast .. .. Peanut Butter .. ..

Honey .........

Milk .........

1 oz.

1

1    dspn 3 ozs.

2    slices 1 dspn 1 dspn 1 glass

Dinner

Roast Beet . • Roast Potato Broad Beans Apricot . Pie . ..

Custard .. Milk Drink ..

.... 2 slices ... 2 pieces . .. IV2 tbspns. . ... 4 apricots

pastry .. .. 1/3 cup

.. .. 1 glass

Tea

Scrambled

Wholemeal

Celery

Wholemeal

Butter

Cheese .

Milk ..

Egg -Toast .

Bread

1

1    slice

2    sticks 2 slices

1 slice 1 glass

Pear.........

%

Supper

V2

Apple

4 O'clock

Milk Drink .

.. .. 1 glass

Calories

lor the

day. 2600

MONDAY

Breakfast

Oatmeal Porridge

Milk ......

Boiled Egg......

Tna st ......

1    oz.

3 ozs 1

2    slices

Sandwich Lunch

Wholemeal Bread Cold Beef . .. Carrot .. .. and Honey

6 slices 1 slice 1

Dinner

Cold Beef......

Cold Potato Salad

Raw Cabbage Beetroot .. . Stewed Prunes .. . Creamed Rice . .. Milk .. -.

2 slices 1 potato & lettuce & dressing 1V2 tbspns.

1    small 10

2    tbspns.

1 glass

Butter

Vegemite .

Milk .......

Pear .......

1 glass

%

Apple ......

and Celery

Celery .....

Milk Drink .....

1

1 stalk 1 glass

Supper

Home Lunch

Cold Beef. Salad

4 O'clock

Milk Drink .....

1 glass

Apple

Calories tor the

y2

day. 2503

TUESDAY

Breakfast

Oatmeal Porridge . 1 oz.

Milk    ... 3 ozs.

Fried Banana    ....    1

and Bacon    ..    ..    1    oz.

Toast    .....1    slice

Butter    „

Date Spread    ..    ..    1    dessert

spoon

Milk    .....1    glass

Orange    ■ ■ • Va

Home Lunch

Toasted Sandwiches


Scimftuicfi Lunch

Wholemeal Bread

6 slices

Cheese . •

1 slice

and Lettuce

2 leaves

Dates

IV2 teaspn.

and Peanut But

ter .....

IV2 teaspn.

Cheese ■ •

and Marmite .

y2 slice

Pear . , •

1

Milk Drink

1 glass

4 O'clock

Milk Drink

1 glass


Dinner

Braised Rabbit ..

1 leg

Mashed Potato ..

2 tbspns.

Cauliflower .. ..

IV2 tbspn,

Raw Cabbage .. ..

1 tbspn.

Baked Pears .. ..

iy2

with Ginger

Celery ......

1 stalk

Milk

1 glass

Supper

Pear

*2

Calories lor the

day, 2637


Breakfast

Sandwich Lunch

Dinner

Wheatgerm . ..

1

tbspn.

Wholemeal Bread

6 slices

Mince Meat . .

3 tbspns.

Stewed Rhubarb

4

tbspns

Brains .....

1 set

Boiled Potato

1 tbspn.

Poached Egg . ..

1

and Nuts .

Broad Beans

1 tbspn.

and Parsley

Bananas .......

2

Raw Cabbage

1 tbspn.

on Toast......

2

slices

Carrot ......

l/2

Orange Juice

Jelly

1 cup

Milk ........

1

glass

Milk Drink......

1 glass

Boiled Custard

1/3 cup

Orange ........

Vs

Milk . ..

1 glass

Supper

Home Lunch

Pear . ..

%

Cauliflower au

4 O'clock

Gratin

Milk Drink .....

1 glass

Calories for

the

day, 2510

THURSDAY

Breakfast

Sandwich Lunch

Dinner

Wheat Porridge .

1

oz.

Wholemeal Bread .

6 slices

Boiled Mutton

2 slices

Milk ........

3

ozs.

Minced Lamb’s Fry

Parsley Sauce

1 tbspn

Sausage ........

2

and Bacon .....

2 tbspns.

Boiled Potato

1

Bacon ..........

%

oz.

Sultanas

Parsnip

1 tbspn.

Parsley

Apple ......

1

Carrot

%

Milk .........

1

glass

Milk Drjnk......

1 glass

Raw Cabbage

1 tbspn.

Celery ........

%

stalk

Baked Raisin

Cus-

*

tard . .

1 cup

Milk . ..

1 glass

Home Lunch

Supper

Lamb’s Fry and

4 O'clock

Apple .

y2

Bacon

Milk Drink......

1 glass

Calories for

the

day, 2584


FRIDAY

Dinner

Smoked Blue Cod 2 pieces Mashed Potato .    . 1 tbspn.

Marrow    . . .    2 rings

Silver Beet    . 1 tbspn.

Celery    . . 1 stalk

Minced Fruit Slice . 1 slice Milk ....... 1 glass

Supper

Pear .......y2


Calories for the day, 2624


Breakfast    Sandwich Lunch

Baked Wheatnuts .    V2 oz.    Wholemeal Bread    6    slices

Stewed Pears    .. ..    1    Mutton .    1    slice

Sultanas........ 1 dspn.    Raisins and Nuts    1    tbspn.

Toast.......... 1 slice    Peanut Butter and

Butter    Honey . .    1 tbspn

Cheese........V2 slice    Carrot ...... 14

Milk..........1 glass    Milk Drink...... 1    glass

Orange........V2

Home Lunch    4 O'clock

Grilled Chop    Milk Drink...... 1 glass

SATURDAY

Breakfast

Dinner

Tea

Wheat Porridge

Milk .......

Kidney.......

Bacon.........

Parsley

Toast.......

Milk.........

Pear.........

. 1 oz.

. 3 ozs. • . 2

. 1 oz.

. 2 slices . 1 glass

Vo

Egg . . and Spinach . Omelette Bread .. .. Butter

Vegemite......

Milk Drink .. .. Carrot .....

. ■ 2 eggs .. 1 bunch

.. 2 slices

.. 1 glass .. 14

Steak and Kidney Pudding . . Mashed Potato Carrot Rings Baked Date Pudding .. .

Raw Apple......

Milk Drink......

% lb.

2 ozs.

2 tbspns 2 tbspns.

1 serve 1

1 glass

Supper

4 O'clock

Apple

%

Milk Drink .. ..

.. 1 glass

Calories for the

day, 2537

SUNDAY

Breakfast

Wlieatnut Wafers, Butter

Stewed Prunes . .. Toast and Vegemite

Milk..........

Orange ........

6

10

1 glass

D

Dinner

Roast Spring Lamb Roast Potato .. Roast Parsnips .. Green Peas .

Sago Plum Pud-ing .......

Milk Drink......

2 slices 2 pieces 2 pieces ID tablespoons

2 tablespoons 1 glass

Tea

Cold Egg Salad . . Beetroot . .. Carrot . .. • Pineapple

Orange D. Banana Peas

Potato Salad . Bread ■ • • Butter. Cheese . .. Milk ■ •

1 egg 3 rings

D

1 slice

D

1 tablespoon

1    tablespoon

2    slices 2 slices 1 glass

4 O'clock

Milk Drink......

1 glass

Supper

Pineapple

Calories for the

1 slice day. 2335

TUESDAY

Breakfast

Wlieatgerm ..

.. 1

dessert

Stewed Cherries

.. 3

spoon

table

Milk

.. 3

spoons

ozs.

Scrambled Egg .

.. 1

with Tomato ..

.. Vi

!

and Parsley on Toast .

.. 1

slice

Milk

.. 1

glass

Carrot

. . Va

Home Lunch

Toasted Banana

Sandwiches


Sandwich Lunch


1 slice day, 2574


Wholemeal Bread 6 slices Cheese & Vegemite 1 tbspn. Banana ...    •■ 1 ,

Raisins and Nuts .. 1 tbspn.

Cherries........ 14 lb.

Milk Drink...... 1 glass


4 O'clock

Milk Drink...... 1 glass


Oinner

Sheeps Tongues .. 1 Parsley Sauce .... 1 tbspn. Mashed Potatoes . . 2 tbspns.

Green Peas .....ID tbspns.

Silver Beet    .    ID tbspns.

Shredded Cabbage . 1 dspn. Bread and Butter Custard ..    .    ID cups

with Sultanas .. 1 dspn Milk ........ 1 glass


Supper

Pineapple .

Calories for the


% lb

Break Hast

Sandteich Lunch

Dinner

Flaked Oatmeal

. 1 oz.

Wholemeal Bread .

6

slices

Grilled Steak or

Sultanas......

.. 1 dessert-

Beans and Tomato

Sausages ..

Milk . . ..

spoon

Sauce ......

IV?. dessert-

Garden Salad

. . 3 ozs.

spoons

Cherry Slice .. ..

Toast.......

. 2 slices

Peanut Butter . . ..

1

tbspn.

Butter

and Parsley

Ice Cream......

Vegemite

Cold Black

Raw Sliced Tomato 1

Pudding .....

2

ozs.

Milk .......

Milk

. 1 glass

Orange ......

1

Lettuce

2 leaves

Milk Drink......

1

glass

Supper

Cherries •

1 Some Lunch

4 O'clock

Baked Beans on

Toast

Milk Drink .....

1

glass

Calories lor the


3 tablespoons 1 small serve 1 glass

day, 2503

THURSDAY

Breakfast

Sandwich Lunch

Dinner

Baked Flaked

Wholemeal Bread

6 slices

Mince Meat .. ..

2

table-

Oatmeal (cold)

1 oz.

Cold Sausage

1

spoons

Sliced Banana . ..

1

Carrot and Marmite

1 table-

Jacket Potato .. ..

1

Currants .. ..

1 dessert-

spoon

French Beans .. ..

2

table-

Milk .. ..

spoon

Sultana .......

IV2 dessert-

spoons

3 ozs.

spoons

Stewed Plums .. ..

5

Poached Egg . ..

1

Lettuce ......

%

Junket ......

1

cup

and Bacon .. ..

1 oz.

Milk Drink......

1 glass

Milk .......

1

glass

Milk . ..

1 glass

Carrot .

V2

Supper

Home Lunch

4 O'clock

Cherries

Grilled Black Pudding on Toast

Milk Drink......

1 glass

Calories for the

day. 2530

FRIDAY

Breakfast

Sandwich Lunch

Dinner

Wheatgerm .

1 dessert-

Wholemeal. Bread

6 slices

Fried Fish......

2

fillets

Stewed Prunes .

spoon

Tomato . .

2

Fried Potatoes ....

2

table-

10

Peanut Butter

spoons

stalks

table-

Milk

3 ozs.

Orange ......

1

Celery .. .. French Beans .. ..

2

2

Grilled Tomato .

2

Milk Drink .. .. ..

1 glass

and Cheese .. Toast . ..

1    oz.

2    slices

Bananas .......

1

spoons

Milk ......

1 glass

in Jellv........

1

cup

glass

Carrot

Milk ........

1

Borne Lunch

Supper

4 O'clock

Peach .

1

Grilled Tomatoes

Milk Drink

1 glass

Calories for the

day, 2450

SATED lì AY

MONDAY

Breakfast

Baked Wheatnuts . 1 oz.


Sandwich Lunch

Wholemeal Bread, 6 slices Peanut Butter and


Dinner

Cold Lamb .

... 2 slices

Potato Salad ..

. .. 1 potato

Tomato ...

and lettuce

. .. 1 tomato

Pineapple . . .

and dress' ing

, .. 2 slices

and Junket .

. .. 1 cup

Milk

. . . 1 glass

Supper

Pineapple

1 slice

Calories for

the day. 2673



Home Lunch

Omelette Savoury


Date,    1 tbspn.

Lamb    .... 1 slice

Egg & Lettuce .. . .

Carrot ......D

Milk Drink...... 1 glass


4 O'clock

Milk Drink...... 1 glass


% slice 1 slice

1 cup 1 small serve 1 glass


Breakfast

Sliced    Pineapple . 2 slices

Milk    ......3 ozs.

Boiled    Egg...... 1

Toast ......3 slices

Butter

Vegemite

Milk .......1 glass

Pineapple....... y2 slice

Dinner

Kidneys    .... 2

Mashed Potato . .. lh> tablespoons

French Beans .... 2 tablespoons

Celery........iy2 table

spoons

Loganberries ..    .    2 table

spoons

Baked in Custard 1 cup

Milk Drink ...    1 glass

4 O'clock

Milk Drink...... 1 glass

Tea

Pineapple .'. ..

and Cheese .. Garden Salad Fruit Salad . .. Ice Cream .. ..

Milk ......

Supper

Peach ..    i

Calories for the day, 2314

THE GROWING CHILD - YOUR CHILD

The below-par child, often through no fault of his own, is a burden to himself, his parents and his teacher . . . The food needs of the growing child have heen clearly defined hy Medical Science, most important of all is “Natural Vitamins” in abundance . . . Seventy-five per cent, of our children will show marked physical, mental and scholastic improvement when given two dessertspoonfuls of PRO-VITA WEAT-HARTS daily . . . WEAT-HARTS offer what the growing child needs — Rich Natural \ itamins.

VITAMIN CONTENT OF PRO-VITA WEAT-HARTS

VITAMIN B1 (not less than 290 units per ounce). Aids digestion, promotes growth, prevents lack of stamina and chronic fatigue.

VITAMIN B2 (not 1 ess than 180 units per ounce). Promotes health of the eves, keeps the skin clear and healthy, aids circulation and tones np muscles and tissues.

NICOTINIC ACI1) (not less than 190 units per ounce). Keeps tissue responses normal and healthy, aids blood count, helps liver, kidneys, muscle and brain.


CHOLINE (not less than 50 mgs. per ounce). INOSITOL (not less than 20 mgs. per ounce). Tones up the gall ¡»ladder, regulates the flow of hile, aids Vitamin absorption, keeps intestines clean and helps kidney function.

VITAMIN E (not less than 10 mgs. per ounce). Promotes hea ltliy arteries, helps maintain oxygen balance and circulation. Helps heart function, increases exercise tolerance and prevents premature ageing—a valuable natural tonic.


PRO-VITA WEAT-HARTS are produced under scientific control from 100 per cent, pure, fresh V heat Germ which is stabilised by an exclusive time-tested process to retain the full quota of essential and much needed nutrients . . . Stabilisation prevents harmful storage deterioration which occurs in many commercial Wheat Germ preparations. The vitamin content is quoted on the label.

“The Family Vitamin Concentrate

8oz. packets, 1/3 each — II lb. cartons, 3/6

From all Chemists and Leading Stores

V15


“One Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Ton of Cure’


Above: Appetising and inviting, Celery and Fish Pie. Below: Celery Soup, a welcome dish on a winter's day.

How can we best make the budget spin out? Money seems to buy less each w7eek. One can be careful, but not stinting on health giving foods, i.e., milk, fruit, vegetables, eggs, butter, cheese. With fruit and vegetables, use those with the highest content of Vitamins and Mineral Salts more frequently than others A good idea is a housekeeping book: rule a column for each type of article—meat, vegetables and fruit, groceries, bread, milk and miscellaneous (covering mending, cleaning, insurance, fuel, etc.)

Use exactly the right ingredients when preparing meals: sometimes one can do with just a fraction under. Eliminate waste as much as possible. Often left-overs can be put into next day’s meals

CELERY AND FISH PIE

1 head young celery 1 oz. butter

Vt pint milk    *

Pepper and salt

Vi lb cooked flaked fish

1 oz. flour

w\ pint celery liquid Bread crumbs

Remove the leaves from the celery (they car. be used for flavoring soup) Cut celery into V2 in pieces, wash and cook in very little water until tender Strain and put into a buttered pie-dish Make a white sauce by melting the butter mix flour to a smooth paste, add milk and celery liquid also seasoning, cook 3 minutes. Cover celery with half the sauce, add flaked fish and cover fish with remainder of sauce. Sprinkle thickly with breadcrumbs Dot with butter and bake until crumbs are brown CELERY SOUP

l/2 or 1 head celery, according to needs H teaspoon salt Shake of pepper

I dessertspoon butter or margarine 1 pint cold water

1 pint milk, with 1 dessertspoon of sago soaked in it.

(a)    Chop vegetables very finely Put on in cold water and salt and simmer % hour. Add milk, butter (or margarine) and pepper and simmer gentlv till sago clears (about y4 hour)

(b)    Use foundation stock of boiled bones, etc. with slight onion flavor; add V2 head of chopped celery and simmer V2 hour.

MACARONI

Made from the Best Hard Wheat
VEGETARÍAN BROTH

3 ozs. Rinoldi Spaghetti

1    level dessertspoon Marmite or Vegemite

Salt and pepper

2    quarts water Chopped parsley

Dice vegetables (with the exception of the peas and spaghetti) and place all in water and boil gently for 1 hour. Add peas and Spaghetti in small pieces and cook for a further 30 minutes. Flavor with Marmite or Vegemite and serve sprinkled with parsley

1 carrot 1 parsnip 1 white turnip 1 white onion 3 sticks celery V2 lb. green peas


MACARONI MYSTERY SAVOURY

i/2 lb. Rinoldi Macaroni 2 ozs. butter 1 onion, finely chopped i/4 lb. lean bacon rashers cut into lin. squares

Cook and drain Macaroni. Heat butter in a large pan and fry onion and bacon. Add tomatoes, sauces and flavorings. Pour this mixture over the hot macaroni in the serving dish. Sprinkle with grated cheese and garnish with grilled bacon rolls, tomatoes and parsley


i/2 lb. tomatoes—sliced

1    tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

2    tablespoons tomato sauce

Salt and pepper


MACARONI and CHEESE CUTLETS

4 ozs Rinoldi Macaroni

2    ozs. butter

3    ozs. flour i/4 pint milk

3 ozs. grated cheese Pepper and salt to taste Egg and breadcrumbs Frying fat


4 or 5 tomatoes 2 ozs. breadcrumbs Seasoning


MACARONI and TOMATO PIE

1 lb. cold meat 3 ozs. Rinoldi Macaroni

1    tablespoon butter

2    tablespoons stock

Boil the Macaroni in salted water. Cut the meat small and slice the tomatoes. Butter a pie-dish. Put in alternate layers of Rinoldi Macaroni, meat, and tomatoes, with seasoning between. Add a very little water or stock. Sprinkle breadcrumbs over the top and put bits of butter over them Bake 34 hour.

For Rinoldi Recipe Book enclose 3d. stamp and write to

THOS. REYNOLDS PTY. LTD.

12 Aberdeen Road, Prahran, Vic.

Put the Macaroni into boiling salted water and cook gently until just tender. Strain the Water from the Macaroni and save it for the sauce; chop the Macaroni Melt the butter in a saucepan, add the flour and cook together, stirring well one minute. Add the milk and about half pint of Macaroni water, little at a time, stirring well. Cook the sauce well and keep ft very thick. Add Macaroni and Cheese and pepper to the sauce. Mix and turn out on a floured board. Shape into cutlets, egg and crumb and fry in hot fat; drain well on paper.


CELERY FOR SANDWICHES

These fresh, crisp, crunchy salads are nutritious, refreshing and appetising for school and office lunches.

(a) Chopped, cooked chicken, or potted meat, diced celery, giated onion, salt and mayonnaise

<b> Chopped celery and grated cheese.

(c) Chopped celery, apple, nuts and salad dressing.

(di Chopped celery and grated carrot.

MINCE DUMPLINGS

Make a dumpling mixture with self-raising flour (rub in dripping, mix to stiff dough). Put seasoning desired into mince meat. Mix equal portions of meat and dough well, form into balls and boil in stock or water.

MACARONI CHEESE

I    pint milk

II    lb. cheese

1    tablespoon flour

2    tablespoons breadcrumbs 1 teaspoon mustard

'■2 oz butter U lb. macaroni Cayenne pepper and salt

Break macaroni and drop slowly into boiling, salted water Boil till tender (about 30 minutes) Strain off water, add milk and boil slowly for 20 minutes    Moisten flour with a little cold

water, add to macaroni, and cook two minutes Add half the grated cheese, mustard, cayenne pepper and salt Grease a piedish, sprinkle with breadcrumbs put in layer of macaroni, sprinkle with cheese and continue till all is used Sprinkle with breadcrumbs and scatter buttei in small pieces Put in oven, or under griller and brown slightly

MOCK GOOSE

1 lb. liver '•> lb. onions

1    apple

2    lbs. potatoes

x/*i teaspoon powdered sage Salt and pepper

Pee) potatoes, chop onion and apple. Cut liver and potatoes in thick slices. Put all ingredients in a casserole, sprinkling the season ing between each layer. Add y2 pint cold water Bake in a moderate oven for 2 hours.

Two savory and delicious luncheon dishes for the family. Above: Mince Dumplings, made from leftover meat. Below: A general favorite with all. Macaroni Cheese.


You Heed


You Heed

an EGG


You Heed an EGG


You Need


You Heed


You Heed


You Need

an EGG

a day! à


You Nee


You Need

am dfin

an cub

a day! a


SAVORY DISHES

BRAISED MUTTON CHOPS 4 mutton chops 1 onion 4 potatoes Salt and pepper

Put a piece oi butter or dripping in a saucepan. melt, then add potatoes and onions, cut into small pieces; add salt and pepper. Cook until browned Clear a place in centre of saucepan in which to put, one by one, yom chops. When all browned both sides, make a bed of vegetables with chops on top Add a cup of cold water and cook for 35 minutes Shake saucepan occasionally

CHEESE SAVORY

A popular savory for both children and adults. For children use a mild cheese; for adults, a sharp tasty one.

Grate cheese fairly finely, about 1 ounce cheese for a full slice of bread. Beat in one egg to 5-6 ounces of cheese, season to taste, and spread on dry, thin, wholemeal bread.

Place in hot oven for about ten minutes till slightly browned on top and serve hot. Delicious alone or with a salad.

LAMB CUTLETS AND BANANAS 4 lamb cutlets 3 bananas 1 oz. butter

Sprig of mint or mint sauce Salt and pepper 1 teaspoon flour

Lightly flour the cutlets, rub them over with melted butter and grill them. Peel and cut the bananas in four, lengthwise, and fry them in butter just enough to heat them through. Bananas must not be over-ripe or unripe. Put the cutlets on a hot dish, surround them with the bananas and serve with mint sauce.


PUREST

INGREDIEiNTS


Make


BERRY’S


JELLY

CRYSTALS

BEST


SPINACH OMELETTE

Spinach 2 eggs Shortening

1 dessertspoon boiling water Salt and pepper to taste

Beat eggs, milk salt and pepper very well add boiling water and pour immediately into hot, melted shortening (butter, fat or lard) Cook quickly, moving pan to prevent sticking Cook topside under griller, adding any flavorings just before omelette cooks (in this case Spinach to be added)

Must be served and eaten hot. Pan should be medium size, very clean and dry. and flat


for your child.

Laboratory controlled Hygienically packed Sure to Set


READ THE FULL, AMAZING STORY

OF WHAT YOU CAN ACHIEVE WITH A NAMCO PRESSURE COOKER

A Namco Pressure Cooker reduces cooking hours to minutes . . . You can cook practically anything and everything in a Namco . . . from a fullroastdinner to marmalade and cake.


16-pint “Conjuror”


CAKE BAKING

You can "bake" cakes perfectly in all Namco's except the "Wizard." and the "Conner" By using low, top-of-the range heat the fuel costs practically nothing as compared with ordinary oven baking First, remove rubber sealing ring from lid and cover cooker Heat Namco Put the mixture in a cake tin place in the Namco and cover with lid Reduce heat to low and bake Now the pressure cooker is servina as a miniature oven, and the even heat radiated from the thick, cast walls of the Namco bakes perfectly in the minimum time

ROASTING

Even the toughest joint becomes tender and succulent in a Namco, while shrinkage is far less than in oven baking The roast is browned in fat, in the open cooker then pressure cooked at 12 minutes a pound Crisp the roast in the oven while making gravy from the tull-flavoured juices in the cooker So simple — so delicious1 ,

7-pintMagician"

JAM MAKING

The thrifty ones make a double saving with Namco jam First it's far cheaper than bought jam second, the fuel cost for Namco jam is much less than for ordinary home-made jam Here's how — fruit and water into the Namco (never more than half full) pressure cook 5 to. 15 minutes, depending on the fruit. Cool the cooker, add a cup of .sugar for every cup of cooked pulp Boil until a spoonful of jam "jells" on a plate (about 10 minutes) Methods vary slightly, but complete directions for most fruits are in the recipe books which accompany every Namco pressure cooker

PRESERVING

The sensational Namco 16-pint Cooker-Canner brings home-preserving within the reach of every housewife The process is fast, safe and simple, while the outlay is small. Remember, too, that the Cooker-Canner is perfect for simple pressure cooking in quantity As an instance of the advantages of the Namco Cooker-Canner bottled carrots are perfectly preserved after only 30 minutes pressure cocking Old methods require hours As a Namco operates at a temperature well above boilmg pbint, the purity and safety of food processed in the Cooker-Canner is assured

SEND FOR RECIPES

Fill in the coupon and send it to Namco, 187 Flinders Lane, Melbourne. Or simply send your name and address if you don't wish to cut your book. Recipes and pressure cooker advice will start coming to you through the mail

FIVE MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM!

Not illustrated is the Namco 7-pint "Wizard"—a popular lightweight version of the famed "Magician." Complete with all standard Namco accessories, and a thick recipe book, the "Wizard" is priced low enough for any budget

NAMCO

PRESSURE COOKER

To NAMCO

187 FLINDERS LANE MELBOURNE, VIC.

Please record my name and address, and send me all future recipes and pressure cooker information.

NAME_____________________________________

ADDRESS_______________________________________


STATE


11-pint “Kitchenerafter

16-pintCooker- Canner

OVERSEAS CORPORATION (AUST. ) LTD. MELBOURNE, SYDNEY, BRISBANE, ADELAIDE, PERTH.

LITTLE POTATO PIE

2 cups mashed potato 1 dessertspoon minced onion 1 dessertspoon chopped parsley Two-thirds cup minced left-over meat 1 cup gravy or stock 1 small onion (or onion salt)

1 cup peas or carrots (if you have some on hand) Salt and pepper

Combine the minced cold meat with small onion peas or carrots, and stock or gravy. Taste for seasoning. Put in saucepan with a lid and simmer gently 20 minutes. Half fill small Pyrex, or individual, moulds with mixture and top with mashed potato into which is whipped minced onion and parsley. Sprinkle with cheese if liked, or merely brush with milk, and bake in moderate oven until potato is crusty.

PAN-FRIED BANANAS

When frying fish, bacon or eggs, place three or four peeled bananas in pan. In a few minutes they are cooked. Serve sizzling hot.

Or try this way. Pan-friend bananas are delicious with fish, poultry, all meats, cheese and vegetables. Peel bananas, fry slowly in fat until tender (easily pierced with a fork), turning them to brown evenly. Sprinkle slightly with salt and serve hot.

When using bananas as a vegetable, cook when firm (i.e., green tipped).

POACHED EGG ON SPINACH

Heat left-over spinach, or cook fresh spinach or silver beet. Poach egg lightly, and place on top. Add a little mayonnaise.

VEAL SQUARES Veal cut into thin squares Whites of two eggs Breadcrumbs

Herbs Pepper and salt

Mix breadcrumbs with herbs, pepper and salt Beat whites of eggs, dip slices of veal in them, then roll in breadcrumbs. Fry in melted butter or dripping for about ten minutes.

DESSERTS

APPLE SAGO

2 ripe apples (Jonathans cook very well o?

Golden Delicious)

1 tablespoon sago

A few raisins or sultanas

Butter

*4 cup water

May De cooked in oven or pressure cooker.

Slice apples (leave skin on if pink coloring i; liked), add water, sago and either pressure cook 5-7 minutes or bake in oven for 20 minutes to half an hour. Dot with butter.

Two simply prepared savory dishes, planned for economy. Above: Serve Little Potato Pie piping hot from the oven. Below: Veal Squares in breadcrumbs, flavored with herbs.

WHY

YOU

NEED

ORANGES !

Because their abundant juice is the most reliable and satisfactory source of VITAMIN C, which becomes deficient in the system through WORRY, OVEREXERTION or FAULTY DIET.

Oranges, taken daily in juice or whole form, RESTORE the body's depleted reserve of Vitamin C, PREVENT the onset of serious internal conditions and INCREASE resistance to infection and fatigue.

The ideal balance of fruit sugar and citric acid in orange juice makes it, in addition, a pleasing, refreshing tonic. Orange peel is even richer in VITAMIN C than the juice or flesh, and thus has a double value in marmalades, puddings, cakes and sa lads.

&

Our orange recipe book gives 250 appetising and attractive ways of using oranges in the kitchen—copies post-free on application to

FEDERAL CITRUS COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA 422 Collins Street, Melbourne

More and more housewives every day are using ETA Table Margarine. They’ve discovered that it's a delicious spread for bread and splendid for cooking.


You, too, will like El A Margarine’s line fresh flavour, its smoothness and spreadability, its dependable nutritional value . . . and its economy.

Every pound of ETA Table Margarine is uniformly fortified with VITAMIN A.

A NUTRITIOUS SPREAD FOR BREAD


BAKED CUSTARD (Sugarless)

2 eggs 2 cups milk

2 saccharine tablets (li grain)

Pinch salt

Beat eggs into warm milk, dissolve saccharine in a little hot, but not boiling, water, add pinch of salt, and a few raisins if desired. Sprinkle with nutmeg' oi desiccated coconut (unsweetened) Dot with butter. Stand in cold water and bake in a cool oven for an hour.

May be made in pressure cooker in 4 minutes

FLUFFY CUSTARD

2 eggs

2 saccharine (14 gr.) tablets ]/2 teaspoon vanilla 1 cup milk

Heat milk and add crushed and dissolved saccharine tablets. Separate the egg whites from yolks, pour hot milk on to slightly beaten yolks and cook in a double boiler until thickened, stirring all the time. Remove from heat. Whisk the egg whites until very stiff and stir them with vanilla into the custard Serve at once

ICE CREAM

An Ice Cream recipe for those who live ir the country where cream and eggs are readih available 1 pint cream

5 saccharine tablets, \4 gr. l7olk of one egg Whites of 2 or 3 eggs (Use other volks for a custard)

Pinch salt

Beat cream until fluffy Beat egg yolk lightly and dissolve crushed saccharine tablets in it Beat whites of eggs until very stiff Stir in lightly and quickly with the cream Add coloring to cream if desired Place in refrigerator and freeze Does not need re-beating.

MINCE TART

V-i lb. mixed currants, sultanas, seeded raisins l/-2 teaspoon spice    \4 teaspoon nutmeg

'a teaspoon ginger 1 teaspoon cinnamon Vi green apple grated 1 oz. margarine or butter 1 dessertspoon lemon juice Brandy (if wished) 1 tablespoon

Make mincemeat by melting margarine and combining it with other ingredients thoroughly.

Make pastry or use confectioner’s flaky pastry. Either fill a large tart or make small pies. (This makes about 1 dozen deep patty tins.)

Bake in hot oven, decreasing heat when pastry rises. Mincemeat may be stored if not all needed at once.

Desserts can be both attractive and dieteticaily sound. Above: Delicious Ice Cream, made at home without sugar. Below: Mince Tart, packed full of dried fruit goodness.

SALADS

A garden salad followed by a fruit salad provides a fresh, tasty and health-giving meal in the summer Salads are also attractive with grills in the winter. Raw fruits and vegetables are much better than cooked ones, when served in this way.

GARDEN SALADS

Use fresh, crisp lettuce leaves as containers for grated carrot, chopped apple and celery, cold potato and mint, diced beetroot, left-over peas and beans, sliced banana, grated cauliflower, sliced oranges, tomato, cucumber, pears and hard-boiled eggs Water-cress may be used to vary the greens. Use whatever dressing you fancy, and don’t forget to add parsley liberally as it is rich in iron. Sultanas, raisins and grated nuts make these salads more attractive and a favorite with the children. Cheese should be grated, or cut in sticks, and served with the salads, particularly when they form the main course of a child’s meal

BANANA AND TOMATO SALAD 6 lettuce leaves 2 tomatoes 2 to 3 ripe bananas Salad dressing

Arrange the lettuce on a platter. Place on each leaf a thick slice of peeled tomato and on this sliced bananas Cover with salad dressing.

MISCELLANEOUS

PEANUT BUTTER SCONES 2V2 cups self-raising flour 1 tablespoon peanut butter

1    tablespoon shortening % cup milk

Rub shortening and peanut butter lightly, but well, into the dry ingredients and mix to a light dough with milk. (All the milk may not be needed.) Knead lightly, cut into small scones, brush with milk and bake in hot oven about 15 to 20 minutes

FRUIT AND NUT FUDGE (Sugarless Sweet)

2    ozs. Copha

8 saccharine tablets (14 grain)

14 lb. desiccated coconut 2 whites of eggs (optional)

A few drops of vanilla or lemon essence 8 ozs. mixed chopped nuts, sultanas, raisins, dates

Mix dry ingredients and pour melted (not boiling) Copha over and mix well. Place on greaseproof paper tray and press mixture to a flat sheet an inch thick. When cold and set cut to required lengths.

APRICOT JAM (Sugarless)

4 lb. apricots 2 cups water

14 oz. gelatine to each Vi pint pulp

4    saccharine tablets (14 grain) or more if liked

Cook apricots in water till tender. Take from the heat, add saccharine and gelatine and stir till dissolved.

The jam does not keep long, so it is wise to make in small quantities and store in small jars RASPBERRY JAM 2 lbs. raspberries 6 tablespoons boiling water 16 tablets saccharine (14 grain)

14 oz. gelatine to each 14 pint of pulp

Soak gelatine in boiling water for 'a few minutes Crush saccharine tablets to a powder and dissolve in a dessertspoon of hot water. Take raspberries from heat. Stir in saccharine and gelatine and bottle Seal while hot YUM YUMS (Sugarless Sweet)

1    heaped dessertspoon cocoa

2    ozs. desiccated coconut 1 egg (not essential)

A little vanilla or lemon essence

5    ozs. Copha butter, melted

8 x 14 grain saccharine tablets (crushed)

Mix together, saccharine, cocoa, coconut, egg and essence Melt Copha and stir thoroughly into dry ingredients Allow to stand for five minutes, form into long rolls, about half an inch in diameter, cut into inch lengths, and immediately roll in coconut, cocoa, minced peanuts. These harden as they cool. May be placed in the refrigerator.

JAFFLES

The recipes are endless for sandwiches made with a Jaffle iron.

Grated Apple—uncooked.

Cooked Apple.

Dried fruits and lemon juice and a little coconut Bananas.

Tomatoes.

Minced left-over meats and vegetables with gravy.

Eggs.

OVEN TEMPERATURES

SLOW OVEN.—Will just tint flour in 5 minutes—250 deg. to 300 deg. F.

MODERATE.—Turns flour golden brown in 5 minutes—350 deg. to 375 deg. F.

HOT.—Will turn flour deep brown in 5 minutes—400 deg. to 450 deg. F. and over.

VERY HOT.—Turns flour dark brown in less than 5 minutes—475 deg. F. and over.

food

9 Pulverises meat and vegetables for babies' diets, invalid foods, tube feedings, etc., completely eliminating tedious sieving.

9 Grinds coffee.

9 Crushes fruit.

• Pulverises fruit for jam —saving hours of cooking.

9 Makes peanut butter, meat spreads, etc.

9 Makes mint sauce, mayonnaise, top dressings, etc., in SECONDS.

9 Liquefies FRESH fruit and vegetables for delicious, nourishing drinks and soups.

9 Grinds and mixes meat and vegetables for savoury patties, omelettes, etc.

• Makes cocktails.

9 Prepares breadcrumbs.

• Chops nuts.

9 Makes shampoo from odd scraps of soap.

9 Makes a wide variety of cakes, scones, sweets, drink«, etc.

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Manufactured by Semak Electrics Pty. Ltd., 147 Chapel St., St. Kilda, Victoria

Wholly set up and printed in Australia for the Publishers, Colorgravure Publications (The Herald & Weekly Times Ltd.), 44-74 Flinders St., Melb., by Herald Gravure Pty. Ltd., 30 Flinders St., Melb.