LANNING FAMILY DIETARY FOR ADEQUATE NUTRITION

WARTIME EDITION


Although this booklet sets out the details of an adequate diet at low cost it will be found to be very useful to every housewife in these days of food shortages. Moreover, the foods actually in short supply or rationed, and the foods which we knew would be rationed have been taken into account when preparing this booklet.

Scientists have proved that if the human body is to be healthy and fit, certain foods are essential and these must be provided in definite amounts, according to the age and the activity of the individual.

For a family consisting of people of different ages and of varying activity, it is necessary to have some general knowledge, not only of food in relation to health, but also what effect age and activity have on the choice of foods.

FOOD THE FAMILY SHOULD

HAVE

The food required by a family represents the sum total of the food requirements of each individual in the family. Any diet must contain foods which will :—

SUPPLY ENERGY for work and play each day. Bread, cereals, butter and other fats, sugars supply this.

ENSURE ADEQUATE GROWTH of children. Good quality protein foods, minerals and vitamins do this:— Milk, cheese, eggs, vegetables, fruit, wholegrain cereals supply these.

BUILD AND REPAIR THE BODY AND HELP PROVIDE RESISTANCE AGAINST DISEASE—

proteins, minerals and vitamins — or “protective” foods, as they are often called, do this:— Milk, cheese, meat, fish, eggs, vegetables, fruit, wholegrain cereals, butter supply these.

MILK :— One pint for each person every dav — more tor children up to six years if possible, and 14 pints for the pregnant woman and nursing mother. Milk food requirements can be made up in the following wavs :—

2 02s. dried whole milk is equal to 1 pint, or — 2 J ozs. cheese is equal to 1 pint of whole milk in food value.

If skimmed milk is available, this can be used in cookery. It is much cheaper than fresh milk and when used in a recipe which includes butter also, the skim milk then replaces whole milk. Dried whole milk reconstituted is slightly cheaper than whole fresh milk.* Tinned sweetened or unsweetened condensed milk is a substitute but not an economical one for fresh whole milk.

EGGS:— Each person is well fed if he has one egg every day. Children should have five each week and adults .‘1-4 or as many as the family budget will allow.

BUTTER:— 8 ozs. per person each week and additional fats in the form of beef, mutton, or pork fat to make up to 10 ozs. per adult.

MEAT:— One average serving of meat each day is sufficient. A ary your meat dishes and choose different kinds and different cuts every day — all have the same food value though some are more expensive. Liver, heart, and kidney are relatively cheap and have in addition to proteins, valuable minerals and vitamins. Liver or heart could with advantage be included in the diet once each week.

FISH:— May be served instead of meat once each week if it is available and is not too expensive.

PEAS, HARICOT, LIMA, OR BUTTER BEANS:—

Use one of these as a meat substitute savoury with cheese once each week for economy and variety.

★ At the time of writing the Pamphlet in April, 1943.

\

GREEN LEAFY VEGETABLES:— Spinach, silver beet, turnip tops, kale, Brussel sprouts, broccoli, cabbage and to a less extent lettuce, are valuable sources of vitamins (A and C) and iron. Other vegetables such as French beans and green peas, though not as rich in minerals and vitamins, contribute an appreciable amount of these factors and should be used when they are in season and their price low.

TOMATOES:— When price permits serve tomatoes each day. They contain valuable vitamin C. When they are too dear and citrus fruits are not procurable, serve extra green leafy vegetables, swedes or potatoes and cook them very carefully.

POTATOES:— Potatoes are of particular value because they are a good energy food. They are satisfying and are a good source of vitamin C. A large serving should be provided for each person every day. The vitamin C value is higher if the potatoes are baked, boiled, or steamed in their jackets.    *

ROOT VEGETABLES:— Other root vegetables, with the exception of swede turnips, are not as rich in vitamin C. Still they make an appreciable contribution of minerals and vitamins in the diet and because of the average low cost, should be used liberally.

CARROTS are an exception, for this vegetable is one of the richest sources of vitamin A and is well worth using frequently.

CITRUS FRUITS :— These are important for their vitamin C content and should be included whenever they are reasonable in price.

OTHER FRUITS :— Pawpaw too, is very rich in vitamin C, and in parts of the country where it is inexpensive, it may well replace citrus fruits or tomatoes. Other tropical fruits such as pineapples (rough skinned varieties are better), persimmons, mangoes, will also supply appreciable amounts of vitamin C.

Berry fruits, particularly blackcurrants, and to a less extent gooseberries, raspberries and loganberries are also a good source of vitamin C. Where these fruits flourish and are inexpensive, they should be used liberally in the fresh, raw state or as syrups and preserves.

Bananas are a good all-round fruit. They are satisfying and they have a higher energy value than most fruits. They also contain vitamins A, BT and C. Many other fruits are relatively poor sources of minerals and vitamins, hut where the food budget permits thev may be included for variety.

DRIED FRUITS:— Dried apples and other available dried fruits, including vine fruits, are useful additions to the diet, but onlv when the price of the dried fruit is less than the price of the fresh article.

CEREALS AND BREAD:— Wholemeal bread has a higher vitamin Bt content than white bread. It is a good rule to use white and wholemeal bread in equal quantities — then use another wholegrain cereal in the day for extra minerals and vitamins. Oatmeal, pearl barley, pearled polished wheat, maize meal — all are available and provide variety.

SWEETS:— Sugar, honey, jam, syrup, sweets as needed to satisfy the appetite. For those engaged in work requiring much energy and muscular activity, sugar is a useful addition to the diet. But remember it contributes energy only and contains none of the essentials required for good nutrition. Sugar and sw'eets should never be taken before meals, for they tend to spoil the appetite for food the body needs.

TEA, COFFEE AND COCOA are the common beverages in use and all have stimulating properties. Tea and coffee, unless served with milk and sugar, have no nutritive properties.

Cocoa, on the other hand, provides extra energy in the form of traces of carbohydrate and fat, and it contains iron and vitamin A also. Prepared with milk it is a nourishing beverage for children.

Over-indulgence in the stimulating beverages (not pr^ pared with milk) and in food accessories such as condiments, pickles and sauces which make a negligible contribution to the diet in proportion to their cost, is extremely wasteful. ’The excessive use of condiments and the like often accompanies poor appreciation of food, and this is generally due to low standards of cookery.

;


When ordering, the housewife should purchase

CHILDREN

GIRLS

9-! 2

1-3

4-<>

7-9

10-12

13-15

months.

years.

years.

years.

years.

years.

10*

10*

10*

10*

7

i

1

4

8

8

8

8

as required

.

5

5

5

2

2

O

4

4

4

4

or

2

2

2

or

1

or

1

or

l

or

l-:*

for all

**1

1-1*

2-4

2-4

2-4

*

i-l

M

1

1

1

3

3

3

3

3

*

*-!

M

1

1

1

2 ozs.

2-4 ozs.

1/3 ib.

1/3 lb.

1 ,/3 lb.

1/3 lb.

i

¿-1/3

M

*-l

Mi

2

i

1

2

2-3

4

4

4 ozs.

4 ozs.

4-8 ozs.

*

*

è

2 ozs.

2-4 ozs.

H

*-i

Ì-Ì

1 oz.

3 ozs.

*

*-l

M

1-1


Milk (pints)    ..    ..

Butter (ounces)    ..    ..

Other fats ..    ..    ..

Eggs    ......

Citrus fruit    ..    ..

Tomatoes (lbs.)    ..    ..

Pawpaws (lbs.)    ..    ..

Swedes (lbs.)    ..    ..

Potatoes (lbs.)    ..    ..

Green and leafy vegetables (lbs.) Fresh fruit (pieces)    ..

Other vegetables (lbs.)    ..

Dried fruits—Apples,    Vine fruits

etc. (lbs.)    ..    ..

Meat, including fish (lbs.) ..

Bread, White n Wholemeal    ) lbs.    ..

Oatmeal

Wheatmeal    ) lbs.    ..

Flour and other cereals (lbs.)

Sugar, Golden Syrup,

Jam, etc. (lbs.)    ..

Further economy can be made by avoiding the practice of buying ready-cooked foods, such as cooked meats, fish and chips, pies and pastries. As a rule it is cheaper to cook at home. Cakes, biscuits and confectionery too, account for a considerable amount of the week’s budget in some homes, particularly where there are children. The money spent on these foods could be spent much more profitably on fruit or on vegetables.

The question then arises as to how much of these various foods is necessary to make up an adequate diet at a minimum cost. It is simplest to consider each type of food in turn and the minimum amount of it which should be allowed per week for each individual.

It is obvious that if money permits, more of certain foods such as eggs and meat would be provided and rather less bread and dripping. The

COST ADEQUATE DIETS

the following quantities for each week’s supply.

GIRLS

WOMEN

BOYS.

MEN.

I *'.-20 years.

Mod.

Active.

Very

Active.

Pregnant

Nursing.

13-15

years.

16-20 years.

Mod.

Active.

Very

Active.

7

2-7

2-7

ID*

10*

7

i

2-7

2-7

8

8

8

8

8

8

s

8

8

2

»>

2

5

5

*>

2

2

2

*

4

4

O

2

o

2

2

o

or

or

or

or

or

or

or

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2-4

2-4

3-5

2-4

2-4

3-5

3-5

3-5

3-5

1

1

1

1

I

1

l

1

1

3

3

3

. 3

3

3

3

3

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

l

1

1/3 lb.

1/3 lb.

1/3 lb.

1/3 lb.

1/3 lb.

1/3 lb.

1/3 lb.

1/3 !b.

1/3 lb.

2

2

2

2

o

2

2*

2*

‘31

4

4

4-6

4

4

6-8

6-8

6-8

6-8

*

*

2

*

i

2

2

2

2

H

*-l

i-i

*-2

*-!

M

M

M

2-1

1-1*

l-n

1-1*

l-U

l-l*

l-l*

1-11

l-l*

l-l*

dietary set out provides the maximum food values, taking everything into account, for the minimum amount of money.

The above table is designed to make it possible to calculate the quantities of food eaten by each member of the family so that the adequacy of any particular diet may be determined. It provides a simple standard for comparison purposes. Alternatively, the family diet for a whole week may be judged from the food purchases made in any week.

The list also serves as a guide for the planning of meals. As an illustration of the system used, a day’s diet for a family consisting of an active man engaged in strenuous work, a woman responsible for the housework and care of the three children — a boy aged 14, a girl aged 12 and a boy aged 8 years is given. Food is allowed for as follows:—

(Continued on Page 10)

(With the exception of the hot savoury, breakfast may be taken as a standard meal.)

(See Page 9)

DAY

BREAKFAST

LUNCH (carried)

DINNER

MONDAY

Potato cakes with chopped bacon. (Mashed potato, seasoning, a little melted fat, chopped bacon. Mould into cakes and bake in oven or fry in hot bacon fat).

SANDWICHES :

White bread — cold meat (from Sunday). Wholemeal bread — cheese. Raw vegetables or

Fruit

Tea (adults)

Milk (children)

Pea soup.

Braised steak with vegetables.

Jacket potatoes.

Spinach.

Creamy Barley (Caramel). Tea (adults).

Milk (children).

TUESDAY

French Toast

(1-2 eggs beaten, added to 1 cup milk, seasoned with salt anu pepper. Dip slices of bread in mixture and fry in hot bacon fat till brown on both sides).

Wholemeal bread. Cheese sandwiches.

W hire bread — egg and parsley sandwiches. Raw vegetables.

Raisins.

or

Fresh fruit.

Tea (adults).

Milk (children).

Cream spinach soup. Corned beef.

Parsley sauce.

Mashed carrots and parsnip. Steamed potatoes.

Stewed dried apples.

Sweet dumplings.

Tea (adults).

Milk (children).

WEDNESDAY

Girdle cakes with syrup. (Less sweet than pikelets. Use wholemeal flour).

White bread —

Corned beef sandwiches. Wholemeal bread —

Peanut butter sandwiches. Raw vegetables, or

Tomato or fresh fruit.

Tea (adults).

Milk (children).

Vegetable soup.

Liver and vegetable casserole or stew. Steamed potatoes.

Cabbage.

Steamed raisin or sultana suet pudding with sweet white sauce.

THURSDAY

Bacon and fried bread or

Fried bread and gravy from

White bread —

Cheese and grated apple sandwiches.

Wholemeal bread —

Pea soup.

Cottage pie.

Steamed pumpkin.

or silver beet.

Fresh fruit. Tea (adults). Milk (children).

FRIDAY

French Toast.

White bread —

Cheese and chutney. Wholemeal bread — Date or Sultana sandwiches.

Raw vegetables, or Fresh fruit.

Tea (adults).

Milk (children).

Pumpkin soup.

•Baked or grilled mince patties (fresh meat).

Baked jacket potatoes.

Carrots in white sauce.

Baked cottage pudding.

Jam sauce.

• (Minced steak, breadcrumbs, seasoning and liquid ; mould into patties and bake, grill or iry).

DAY

BREAKFAST

MIDDAY MEAL

EVENING MEAL

SATURDAY

Mince and vegetables on toast.

Savoury :

Cereal, cheese and onion. (? cups cereal cooked in boiling salted water — add ¿-lb. lightly fried onions and ¿-lb. or more grated cheese. Serve with parsley. Tomato may be added also.).

Raw vegetable.

Bread

Butter.

Jam.

Fresh fruit.

Tea (adults).

Milk (children).

Irish Stew —

(with onions, carrots, potatoes).

Spinach stalks with white sauce.

Rhubarb pic.

.Custard sauce.

SUNDAY

Scrambled eggs on toast.

Roast leg mutton.

„ pumpkin.

„ potatoes.

Buttered cabbage.

Cornflour date or sultana mould.

(N.B. Cold meat for lunches on Monday.)

Haricot bean or dried peas savoury with cheese. Bread, butter, jam.

Fresh fruit.

Tea (adults).

Milk (children).

NOTE

Every attempt has been made to include only those foods which are known to be readily available however it may be necessary to arrange for substitutes for any temporary shortages.

HEALS

MEASURE

FATHER

MOTHER

BOY 14

GIRL 12

BOY 8

BREAKFAST:

Oatmeal Porridge

Cup (8 fluid ounces)

H

1

n

1

1

Milk (fresh whole)

fluid ounces

3

3

3

3

3

Brown sugar, or Golden Syrup (on porridge)

teaspoon

2

1

2

1

1

Potato Cakes

(with chopped bacon)

each 1, 3 cup

2

1

2

1

1

Gravy

cup

i

i

i

i

Bread or Toast

slice (1 ounce)

2

1

2

1

1

Butter

level teaspoon

2

2

2

2

2

Golden Syrup or Jam

level tablespoon

2

1

2

1

1

Milk for tea (fresh whole)

fluid ounces

2

1

______

- -

Cocoa (made with whole dried milk)

cup

1

1

1

Sugar

teaspoon

2

1

1

1

1

LUNCH:

(when cut and carried) :

Sandwiches, 1 round1 consisting of :—

Wholemeal bread Butter

AND

hilling :— .

Cold meat

2 thin slices

2 level teaspoons (1/3 oz.)

Round

2

1

/

1

1

Cheese

Round

1

1

2

1

2

* Lettuce leaves

leaves whole

2-3

2-3

2-3

2-3

2

Raw carrot or raw1 Swede

1 oz.

1 oz.

1 oz.

1 oz.

1 oz.

1 oz.

t Tomatoes (in season)

medium size

1

1

1

1

1

OR

or

or

or

or

or

Fruit (in season)

pieces

1

1

1

1

1

Milk for tea

fluid ounces

2

1

Sugar

level teaspoon

2

1

Milk for children

fluid ounces

— '

6

!

6

6

MEALS

MEASURE

......

FATHER

| MOTHER

BOY 14

| GIRL 12

BOY 8

DINNER:

Braised steak (1-lb. meat). WITH

1-lb. vegetables

(onions, carrots, swedes)

• -portion of

whole

i

1/6

i

.............

16

1/6

Potatoes

cooked in jackets

small (about 4 to 1-lb.)

2

1

2

1

1

Silver Beet

cup

i

i

i

i

Cereal milk pudding with raisins or sultanas (1-pt. milk, £ cup cereal, 4 ozs. raisins)

cup

i

i

i

i

i

Milk for children

fluid ounces

— 1

6

6

6

Tea

cups

2

1

Milk for tea

fluid ounces

2

1

Sugar

teaspoonfuls

2

1

~ i

II

Thus :— 4 ozs. dried milk, 24 ozs. cheese and 3 pints fresh milk are equal to 6 pints for the family. The division could be made as follows:

FRESH MILK — 3 PINTS :

Porridge for all — 3 ozs. each ..    ..    15 ozs.

Tea for adults during day...... 9 ozs.

Milk for children (lunch) G ozs. each..    18 ozs.

Milk for children (supper, or

afternoon) G ozs. each ..    .    18    ozs.

Total    ..    60    ozs.

DRIED MILK — 2 PINTS :

Cocoa for children (breakfast) ..    ..    20 ozs.

Milk for cooking, soups, sauces,

puddings, etc.........20    ozs.

Total    ..    40    ozs.

CHEESE — 2j ozs. (equivalent to 1 pint Milk)

Divided thus : Father, f oz.; mother, § oz.; boy 14, | oz.; the other two children § oz. each.

Hence each child receives the equivalent of approximately 1J pints of milk each day.

BUTTER — Assuming that 8 ozs. butter per head is purchased each week, the daily allowance of an ounce and 1/7 should be used by each person on bread, vegetables, etc. Any fat required for cooking should be from another source, such as clarified dripping. It is essential that each person should have his fair share of the ration. Meats, vegetables and all other foods are apportioned in a like manner.

On pages 7 and 8 (centre spread) are shown the details for a minimum cost dietary for one week. Current prices1 have been used and quantities necessary given.

It is important to realise that when planning for a minimum cost dietary, selection may be rather limited at times, and that variety and interest in the meals may suffer. But with careful thought and planning, good results are possible.

* April, 1943

Aim to use the amounts of foods suggested and plan meals some days in advance. This practice facilitates ordering and marketing. Serve seasonable foods for they are cheaper and better, and plan to have foods which are less substantial in warmer weather, e.g. a steamed suet pudding is welcome in winter time, but not at the height of summer — gelatin puddings, milk puddings and stewed fruits are more suitable. Similarly, soup to precede the main course at dinner in winter is desirable, but not essential — in summer it may be omitted.

Fatty or fried foods take a long time to digest. These should be well spaced amongst, other foods which digest readily. This is of special importance when there are young children in the family — so make it a rule not to use the frying pan more than once or twice each week. Anyway, potato cakes, rissoles, etc., are just as attractive when baked. It is poor planning to serve a pie, pastry or a steamed suet pudding with a roast or baked dinner. By doing this you serve too many foods which take a long time to digest.

Flavour, colour and texture of the food are most important considerations if meals are to be appetising. Natural food flavours, well blended, help to make meals interesting. If the foods are fresh, properly prepared and cooked with the necessary seasoning, there should be little need for the use of prepared condiments and sauces. Natural food colours when used to advantage encourage the appetite. An unharmonious blend of colour will have the opposite effect, e.g. tomato and beetroot do not blend, but tomato and grated carrot provide a pleasing note of colour when served against a background of lettuce.

When planning the meals, commence with the main meal of the day and after the meat has been decided upon, then decide on the vegetables to follow and soup (if served). Finally choose the pudding or sweet. Next, the breakfast, and last of all plan the lunch. In the luncheon menu, an attempt should be made to use the necessary foods not already included in the other two meals.


In the foregoing menu plans, it is assumed that the father and children take packed lunches. It will be observed that in the lunch, the raw green or root vegetables and raw fruit (the day’s ration) is included. The sandwich fillings are chosen with special reference

to the other meals and frequently the cheese allowance is used. Milk for the children is carried in bottles and in winter time this could be replaced by soup (using the milk and any vegetables).

W here the money allowed for the food budget is limited, the hot dish for breakfast may be omitted. If this is done, then raisins or dates (if procurable) should be added to the porridge to make it more substantial. Also serve an extra pint of milk per day (dried or fresh whole milk). Conversely, if more money is available for food, spend the additional on increased quantities of milk, vegetables and fruits. The quantities of meat suggested are ample for adequate nutrition, but more expensive cuts might be purchased.

At the time of compiling the lists, tinned tomatoes were unobtainable and when fresh tomatoes are over 6d. per lb. they must be omitted from the plans. Oranges at 2d. each should be given to infants and young children as a source of vitamin C. If oranges are not available, however, then tomato juice or the juice squeezed from grated raw swede turnip — 2-3 ozs. for each child every da}'—will supply the child’s requirement of vitamin C. For other members of the family, extra greens, sw'edes (raw for lunch) and potatoes should be included and the cookery methods carefully controlled.

As it is assumed that the man and the children take lunches from Mondays to Fridays (inclusive) no allowance has been made for the housewife. Observation has led us to suppose that many housewives take little pains to provide an adequate mid-day meal for themselves. Frequently the meal consists of tea, bread, butter and jam. Bearing this in mind, as well as the fuel problems and other practical considerations, no special dishes are suggested. In order to obtain the benefit of the balanced diet planned for the family, the housewife should prepare a fifth cut lunch for her own consumption. Hot soup (left over from the previous evening) could of course be added in winter time or in place of one round of sandwiches.

THE WEEK’S FOOD BUDGET.

(For family of five, consisting of an active man, a woman doing house work,

a boy of 14, a girl of !2 ar.J a boy of ".)

COST £ s. d.

FOOD STUFF.

WEEKLY AMOUNT.

RATE.

Fresh whole milk

21 pis. (:> pts. per day)

4d. pt. .

7 0

Dried whole milk

l;‘ lbs. (making 14 pts.)

1,3A for 12 ozs. .

8 14

Cheese

1 A Iks.

1 ,/i> lb. .

2 1A

Butter

2 A lbs.

1 /» lb. .

4 4 A

Dripping

1 lb.

Gld.lb. .

G4

Suet

A lb.

Gd. lb. .

3

Eggs

i dozen

2 4 dozen .

2 4

Steak (chuck)

1 lb.

lOd. lb. .

10

Corn beef (not roiled)

2A lbs.

7d. lb. .

1 Ó4

Liver

1 (about 1 4 lbs.)

8d. each .

8

Steak (chuck minced)

1 lb.

lOd. lb. .

10

Leg chops

1 lb.

ltd. tb. .

9

Mutton (leg)

2A lbs.

9d. lb. .

1 n>4

Bacon

A lb.

1/9 lb. ' .

H»4

Potatoes

15 lbs.

5 lbs. 1/- .

3 C

Cabbage

2A lbs. (Med.)

1/6 each .

1 0

Pumpkin

4 lbs.

2Ad. lb. .

10

Spinach

1 bunch (buy A bunch

2 x in week) '

1/- bunch (large) .

1 0

Swedes

3 lbs.

4d. lb. .

1 0

Carrots

3 lbs. (2 bunches)

Gd. bunch .

1 0

Parsnips

4 lb.

f>d. lb. .

2A

Onions

14 lbs.

3d.lb. .

4 4

Tomatoes

4 lbs.

Gd. lb. .

2 0

Rhubarb

1 bunch

lOd. bunch .

10

Apples

5

lAd. each .

74

Bananas

5

1 Ad.each .

74

Dried apples

4 lb.

1/4 lb. .

8

Sultanas

1 lb.

1/- lb. .

1 0

Haricot Beans

1 lb.

7d.lb. .

54

Split Peas

4 lb.

5d.lb. .

2i

Cornflour

6 ozs.

7d.lb. .

3

Barley

1 lb.

4d. lb. .

4

Oatmeal

3 lbs.

4d.lb. .

1 0

Flour

24 lbs. •>

Wholemeal Flour

4 lb. /

2Ad.lb. .

74

Bread, white

12 lbs. (6 x 2 lb. loaves)

GAd. loaf \

„ Wholemeal

12 lbs. ( „ „ )

GAd. loaf /

6 G

Jam

3 lb.

1/- for 1A lbs. .

6

Golden syrup

1 lb.

9Ad. for 2 lbs. .

4A

Sugar

3 lbs.

4Ad.lb. .

1 li

Tea

4 1b.

3/4 lb. .

10

Cocoa

4 lb.

1/10 lb. .

54

Sundries :

Baking powder, salt,

pepper, etc.

4

£2 14    7

FOOD IS A WEAPON OF VICTORY ...USE IT TO THE BEST ADVANTAGE

This pamphlet has been compiled under the supervision of the Nutrition Committee of the National Health and Medical

Research Council.

.    Issued by

The Commonwealth Department of Health Canberra

1

When lettuces are not home-grown and are expensive in the market, the food value is low in proportion to the expenditure made. Therefore omit the lettuce, but do not neglect to pack at least an ounce of either raw carrot or swede each day.

t Tomatoes are better value than any of the fruits except citrus and semi-tropical fruits as mentioned in previous discussions.

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PORRIDGE — half a pound of oatmeal is allowed for each person per week and an extra quarter pound for the father and the older boy, that is, lbs., plus ¿lb., a total of 3 lbs. Each day one-seventh of this amount would be used, that is, about 7 ounces or 1J cupfuls, of dry, uncooked oatmeal. The total cooked volume will then be divided as follows :— the father and older boy each receive one-fourth part, while the mother and the other two children each receive one-sixth part.

MILK — assuming that the budget permits a fair milk allowance, the equivalent of 6 pints, and that three pints of fresh milk are purchased each day, then 3 pints should be allowed for as whole dried milk and/or cheese.