1930

ho««wilc’$ (inde

Containing Toilet Hints, Feeding and Care of Baby, Prize-Winning Cooking Recipes, etc., etc.

The whole of the proceeds of the sales of this publication will go to the HOBART :::    ::: PUBLIC HOSPITAL :::    :::

PRICE : ONE SHILLING

Published by S. F. Madden, Hobart, Tasmania COPYRIGHT

there’s no better

'tm


xr Sa U

** J9 $§


BUY FOR BYE-BYE

THAN

STRIDE'S

BEDDING

GOOD SLEEP MEANS GOOD HEALTH OUR BEDDING PRODUCES tsKh BOTH • ill

STRIDE'S \¥HOLESALE AND RETAIL BEDDING FACTORY, 154 LTVERPOOL-STREET, HOBART. ’PHONE: 4950.

COOKING WITHOUT LOOKING!

—to the minute. That’s how the “New World” cooks your meals. There’s no waiting and no waste of gas. You simply set the “Regulo” control dial by the cooking chart. Then you note the time the food will take to cook. And that’s all. It can’t burn. It can’t waste. The food is perfectly cooked, and never varies. You can leave the oven to itself meanwhile. It will cook just as well while you are out shopping. No other cooker has the advantages of the “New World.”

SEE ONE TO-DAY FOR YOURSELF AT THE GAS SHOWROOMS 59 COLLINS STREET

PREFACE

^ i t *

kJ


l wish to thank all the business people whose advertisements appear in this publication, as, by their co-operative support, they have made it possible for the whole of the net proceeds of sales or this work to be handed over to the Hobart Public Hospital.

1 he tried Cooking Recipes contained herein should find favour with the housewife, as a great number of them have won prizes.

S. E. MADDEN, Publisher.

TRAM TIME TABLE

From General Post Office to Cascades, Upper Macquarie Street, every 15 minutes from (¡.30 a.m. till noon, then every 10 minutes till 7.30 p.m., then every 15 minutes till 11.30 p.m. Sundays, ('very 15 minutes from 12.30 to 10 p.m.

From General Post Office to New Town, Moonah, and Glenorchy, every 10 minutes from 6.30 a.m. to 11 p.m., then 11.15, 11.35, and to Moonah only 11.55 p.m.; every 5 minutes to and from Risdon Road from 7.40 a.m. to 9.10 a.m.; every 5 minutes to Moonah from 11.55 a.m. to 7.35 p.m. Sundays to Glenorchy, 12.30, 12.50. 1.10 p.m., and every 10 minutes till 10 p.m. To Moonah every 5 minutes from 2.20 till 8 p.m.

From General Post Office to Lenah Valley every 20 minutes, at 15, 35, and 55 minutes past each hour from 6.35 a.m. to 11.15 p.m., then 11.30 p.m. Sundays, 1.35 p.m., and every 20 minutes till 9.55 p.m.

From General Post Office to Sandy Bay every 15 minutes from 6.45 a.m. till noon, then every 10 minutes till 7.30 p.m., and every 15 minutes till 11.30 p.m. To Lord Street everj 5 minutes between 11.55 a m. an 1 7.35 p.m. Sun days, 12.30, and every 15 minutes till 10 p.m.

From Liverpool and Elizabeth Streets to West Hobart, ('very 15 minutes from 6.30 a.m. till 7.30 a.m., every 10 minutes till 8 p.m., then every 15 minutes till 11.30 p.m. Sundays to West Hobart, 12.32 p.m., and every 15 minutes till 10.2 p.m.

From Liverpool and Elizabeth Streets to North Hobart, 6.55, 7.10, 7.25. 7.40, and 8 a.m., then every 10 minutes till 7.50 p.m., then 8.10, and every 15 minutes till 11.10 p.m. Sundays, 1.10 p.m., and every 15 minutes till 9.55 p.m.

From General Post Office to Proctor’s Road every 15 minutes at 10, 25, 40, and 55 minutes past, each hour, from 6.40 a.m. till 10.40 p.m., 11 p.m., and 11.15 /p.m. Sundays, 1.55, and every 3 5 minutes till 9.55 p.m.

ISSUED NOVEMBER, 1929.

"There is no Substitute”

You Always Get the

"Best for Less”

at

JOHNSTON & MILLER’S

Popular Murray Street Stores

HABERDASHERY ROBES, FROCKS COSTUMES and MILLINERY MEN’S and BOYS’ CLOTHING and MERCERY


HOUSEHOLD LINENS TOWELS SHEETINGS, ETC. CARPETS LINOLEUMS CURTAINS and BLINDS DRESS MATERIALS HOSIERY and GLOVES

Sole Agents


“Sure Wear“ Sheeting

CREDIT

SHOPPERS

PLEASE

note—


- WE ACCEPT - Particulars from

Credit Orders c““Ao“L

“As Your CASH Payment "    103-107 Collins

for Goods selected at our Store    Street

JOHNSTON & MILLER

Pty. Ltd.

“FOR VALUE AND SERVICE”

INDEX

I ram Ti me Table .    .    .

Weights an d M easures .

TOILET HINTS.

Acne.........

Baldness.......

Beauty Bath ......

Breathing Ex ercises .    .

Chilblains.......

Complexion......

Double Chin......

Eyes..........

Eyebrows.......

Eyelashes.......

Figure .........

Hair..........

Flome-made Cold Cream . Hollow Cheeks.....


Page

1

3

5

3

5

5

7

7

7

9


COGICING RECIPES.


1 1


Page

Soups..........15

Breakfast Dishes .    .

Meat Dishes F ish Dishes .

Poultry Dishes......24

Vegetable Dishes    .    . 23-26

Salads........26-27

Puddings and Sweets .    . 28

Scones . . . ......29

Biscuits........29

Savouries........30


anc


Entree .    . 17-19

... 21

... 23


Feeding and Care of Baby.......3 1-32


WEIGHTS AND MEASURES

4 1 easpoonfulsrr 1 tablespoonful liquid 4 Tablespoonfuls =: 1 wine glass.

2 W ine glasses= 1 gill, or half a cup.

2 Gills = I coffee cupful, or 16 tablespoonfuls. 2 Coffee cupfui3=r:l pint.

2 Pints” 1 quart.

4 Quarts“ l gallon.

2 7 ablespoonfuls — 1 ounce (liquid).

1 Tablespoonful of salt“ I ounce.

16 Ounces—1 pound, or 1 pint.

4 Coffee cupfuls“ l pound.

1 Quart of flour = 1 pound.

8 Eggs = 1 pound.

1    Pint of sugars 1 pound.

2    Coffee cupfuls of sugars 1 pound.

1 Coffee cupful = £ pound.

An ordinary tumblerfuls £ a pint.

25 Drops of liquids 1 teaspoon.

3

HOUSEWIVES — REMEMBER I

i o ensure Best Results from Cooking it is essential to use the BES 1 ingredients; therefore, purchase the BES I OP MEAT irom

NELSON FOSTER

(Successor to Walpole and Foster)

::    THE HIGH-CLASS BUTCHER

AND SMALLGOOD3 MANUFACTURER

t

Corner Elizabeth and Liverpool Streets

i elephone 5543

T.


!


we put the fact in ^

satis fa

Cut Down Your

Grocery Bill

Small leakages in your weekly expenditure soon eat a hole in your housekeeping' funds.

Shop here and cut down your grocery bill without sacrificing quality.

We buy in the Best markets and are satisfied with a small profit.

LESTER BROS.

FAMILY GROCERS 133 LIVERPOOL STREET ’Phone 3327

TAKE YOUR

I PRESCRIPTIONS

To

P. RYAN

DISPENSING CHEMIST 49 ELIZABETH ST. HOBART

'Phone 4l25 ? Accuracy and Purity of Drugs Our Chief

i

Consideration

TOILET HINTS

ACNE.

The ugly spots or pimples which frequently appear on the face—especially of young people—is a disease of the skin glands, and when it takes the form of what is called “iblackheads” detracts considerably from the beauty of the skin. It is a common practice to force “blackheads” out by pressure of the fingers, but this is not only painful but leaves a swelling which sometimes develops into a hard and permanent lump. An excellent lotion for getting rid of these things is made as follows:—Flowers of sulphur, one teaspoonful: rose-water, one pint; glycerine, one teaspoonful. But when the specks are obstinate the following will be found effective:—Liquid ammonia, 20 drops; ether, 1 drachm; Pears’ Soap, 1 ounce; methylated spirit, 20 grams; water, 10 grams. Bathe affected places, then rub in a little of the mixture, afterwards wash off with hot water. Persons subject to acne should avoid tea and coffee, and use cocoa or warm milk instead. They should not eat pastry, sauces, cheese, or any highly-seasoned dishes, but eat freely of fruit, tomatoes, and well-cooked green vegetables. At night, the face should be washed in hot water and steamed well, afterwards rubbing a little eau de cologne into the skin.

BALDNESS.

There are many vaunted specifics for the prevention and cure of baldness; but none loss harmful or likelier to afford general satisfaction than the following cheap and simple application:—Whisk up the yolk of one fresh egg, and mix therewith an equal quantity of the squeezed and strained juice of chopped and uncooked Spanish onions. Add thereto as much crude cod-liver oil in quantity as the two foregoing ingredients make together, and then whisk the whole for fully five minutes. The resulting ointment may be perfumed to mask its rather disagreeable odour, placed in a tight receptacle, and a little rubbed into the scalp patiently every night, after first bathing the part well with warm water. This application will not, of course, be efficacious, if what are commonly called the hair “roots” are decayed from natural causes; nor, for the matter of that, will anything else.

BEAUTY BATH.

A beauty bath, of especial benefit to those who suffer from a dull, sallow skin, is ordered as follows:—If possible use rain-water of comfortable temperature for this bath, or, failing that, warm water from the tap, softened with borax. Then bring into use a specially prepared bath lotion made as follows:—Four ounces of rose water, to which must be added one ounce of glycerine, a teaspoonful of powdered borax, one ounce of alcohol, one ounce of tincture of benzoin. Before being used this mixture should be allowed to stand about a week, being occasionally shaken to secure the proper mingling of the ingredients. At the end of that time two ounces of rose water should •be added.

BREATHING EXERCISES.

The disagreeable “colds” which affect young and old alike during the winter months would be almost unheard of if everyone indulged in a regular course of breathing exercises. Ten minutes at a time, in the morning, and once during the day, either out of doors or before an open window, devoted to correct breathing should, in a very short time, work a wonderful change for the better in an anaemic person. A girl or woman before commencing to exercise should loosen the corset and all belts and bands that are at all tight; the window must be wide open, if the exercise is performed indoors, and the patient essaying the deep breathing “cure” must stand facing it and take deep 'breaths.    These must be drawn    in    slowly and    steadily through

the nose, until    the chest rises and    the    lungs feel    as full as they

can comfortably be. The breath should be held for at least two seconds, and then forcibly expelled through the mouth. After the lungs have been completely emptied, a few seconds’ pause should be allowed before the process is repeated.    Very delicate girls may    find    this exercise    rather exhausting

at first, and should be allowed to lie down in    the early stages of the “cure,”

say, upon a rug on the grass in summer, or on the floor in winter, before the open window, with a rug pushed up to the door to prevent draught. Very weakly people, especially those whose hearts are at all affected, should fill the lungs by short breaths at the beginning, and as the lungs gain strength by the exercise the breathing can be lengthened without fatigue.

FOR

FROCKS COATS COSTUMES EVENING FROCKS FUR COATS CHOKERS JUMPER SUITS And CARDIGANS

Wallace Bros.

Pty. Ltd.

71 ELIZABETH ST.

HIGHTONE

I 18 LIVERPOOL ST.

"THE BON MARCHE” ?

MERCANTILE

Doll Hospital

o

MUTUAL

B. C. CLARK I

o

INSURANCE

77 |

co„

ELIZABETH STREET

HOBART !

(Opposite Charles Davis |

Ltd.) |

A PURELY AUSTRALIAN COMPANY

Transacts all Classes of

FANCY GOODS

Insurance (except Life)

TOYS f

at Lowest Current Rates

and •

NOVELTY STORE *

Office:

105 MACQUARIE ST.

1 elephone 4946 i

HOBART

G

TOILET HINTS—Continued HOLLOW CHEEKS.

A good plan when the cheeks become noticeably hollow is to wet them with cold water, and while wet rub with a soft curly towel round and round in the sunken places very deeply, so as to affect the muscles beneath the skin. It will bring fresh blood to feed the muscles, and will strengthen and render them firmer. This simple attention will often cause the sunken cheeks to fill out.

CHILBLAINS

Chilblains are very troublesome in winter to many people, and when on the hands are unsightly. The following solution, if adopted in the earlier stages, will generally effect a permanent cure: Put three grains of sulphate of copper to an ounce of water, while equal parts of soap, liniment, and belladonna will help to allay the irritation. Another efficacious and simple remedy is this: Take a piece of alum, about the size of a walnut, and molt it in a pint of hot water. Soak the hands in the liquid before going to bed for ten or twelve minutes, after which they should be covered with gloves without grease of any kind. In the morning the hands should be soaked in a solution made of half a pint of rose water, three drachms of sulphuric acid, and the same quantity of myrrh.

DOUBLE CHIN.

There are three corrective courses open to one threatened with the undesirable adiposity known as “double chin.” The first is massage, which in this instance consists in gently pinching and kneading the flesh by holding it firmly and rolling in the fingers, and then smoothing it back. This treatment must be steadily persevered in if it' is to be beneficial. A second method is directed to reducing the amount of flesh beneath the chin by means of bands of plaster to keep the superfluous flesh in position. These bandages should be worn every night, and although they are by no means comfortable, constitute a reliable remedy. The bandage must be placed under the chin, and passed over the ears by the crown of the head. It is always advisable to have an additional strap passed from the outer edge of the bandage to the back of the head. They may be made of the ordinary bandaging strips or of a good elastic. In the latter case care has to be taken that they are not drawn too tight, so as to interfere with the circulation. The third, and perhaps the most certain remedy for “double chin,” is a regular course of exercises. Begin by throwing the head backwards and upwards, at the same time keeping the lower jaw thrust out. The teeth should then be clenched, anti the muscles of the throat drawn upward and relaxed, and then drawn up again. Turning the head from side to side to the fullest angle of which it is capable should be the next exercise. If these exerciss are indulged in for about ten minutes a day there would be a very marked improvement in the condition of the chin in the course of a few weeks.

HOME-MADE COLD CREAM.

This will be found reliable, and preferable to the unknown admixtures which are sometimes advertised under pretentious appellations. One ounce of good white wax, half an ounce spermaceti. Dissolve very gradually by placing, immersed in two ounces of olive oil. in a basin near the fire. Cool upon amalgamation. Stir in three drops otto of rose, or orange-flower water to perfume it, and put away in a close-lidded pot or jar for use. It is an admirable emollient, quite free from irritating properties.

COLOURS AND COMPLEXIONS.

Blue is unsuited to the brunette, because its orange reflection intensifies a dark complexion; but a blue veil will diminish the effect of bright light on the hue of any skin, just as blue spectacles preserve the eyes from the sunshine.    •

THE COMPLEXION.

Cleanliness has more than all else to do with promoting and keeping a clear complexion. Frequent and regular lavation, with the avoidance of all injurious soaps, is the prime essential. Sound and refreshing sleep has a very beneficial effect upon the complexion. The habit of falling asleep at a few moments’ notice is one to be encouraged in the interests of health—a more important consideration even than colouring, though inextricably bound up with it. After unusual fatigue, the face of even a young woman has a drawn and tired look which ages it palpably. A quarter of an hour’s sound sleep re-

FOR ALL TOILET AND NURSERY REQUIREMENTS

— USE —

JOHNSON’S BABY POWDER

THE MOST SOOTHING AND REFRESHING TALCUM POWDER ON THE MARKET PER TIN 1/6 PER TIN

Wh olesale from . . .

McVILLY & LITTLE

PTY. LTD.

123 LIVERPOOL. STREET

AND ALL RETAILERS THROUGHOUT THE STATE

THE BOOKSHELF j ARTHUR JONES

LIBRARY

/


READ THE LATEST BOOKS AT A MINIMUM COST

TERMS

TOWN:

3    G    12

rnth.s. mths. mths. One Book ..    7/6    12/6    21/0

Two Books    10/0    17/6    20/0

Three Books    12/6    21/0    27/6

Four Books    15/0    25/0    12/0

COUNTRY:

Two Books    7/6    12/6    21/0

Four Books    10/0    17/6    20/0

Six Books..    12/6    21/0    37/6

DEPOSIT SYSTEM:

Ik>es not apply to Country Subscript ions.

2/6 per annum and id. per hook per week

Special Subscriptions Arranged Rail and other I* reight Concessions

W. E. FULLER

99 COLLINS STREET HOBART


w 55 ELIZABETH • ^ 'r.    STREET


HOBART


v '*»/>

For-


F irst-Class Tail oring and

Up-to-date

Mercery

Style, Fit, and w orkmanship Guaranteed

JOB CLEAVES CUTTER

“We Fit the Hard to Fit’


moves this and replaces it by the soft commingling of white and pale pink, which is tlie characteristic of the finest blonde complexions, or the rose and olive of the brunette.

Much can be done to improve a poor complexion by plenty of exercise and hygienic living, as here and elsewhere insisted upon. Beyond this, steaming has a surprisingly good effect upon some sallow, thick-looking skins. Hold the face for a while over water as hot as it can be borne without scalding, keeping the eyes closed and the steam in with a son of tent formed with a bath towel. Renew the hot water occasionally. Then wash with soap and douche the face with cold soft water. The hot water opens the pores of the skin, the soap cleanses it. and the cold closes the pores and stimulates the skin to healthy action. It also braces it against the sun, the east wind, or frost. Some people rub in a little can de cologne to finish the process, but this is not necessary.

To remove the painful smarting which results from exposure to tin* sun, especially in sea air, the following preparation is of value:—An ounce of soap dissolved in three ounces of orange-flower water, mixed with one and a half ounces of orris root dissolved in four ounces of spirits of wine. Let all stand for a day or two, pour it. off the sediment, and pour a little into lukewarm soft water to bathe the face, particularly after exposure to the sun and wind. “Tan” can be removed from the face by the application of a little peroxide of hydrogen, diluted with water. Have it mixed by a chemist, and on no account made too strong. For “freckles” some recommend the application of buttermilk, and it can do no harm.

A serviceable complexion wash ifor use after exposure may be thus prepared: Peel a large cucumber or two, cut in slices, place in a double boiler closely covered, and cook slowly—without water—until soft. Put the pieces in a fine linen bag, and squeeze until all juice has been extracted; add to the juice one-fourth rectified spirits of wine (or whisky will do) and one-third elder-flower water. Shake well, pour into small bottles, and seal. The lotion may be applied several times a day at first, and less frequently when the skin has become clearer. Shake well before using.

The skin in winter is liable to become dry, tough, and red. For the hands, which generally suffer even more in frosty weather, an excellent plan is to rub a mixture of glycerine and rose water into them when half dry, and finish the drying process thoroughly afterwards. This will keep the hands soft and white in the bitterest weather, if gloves be constantly worn out of doors and an old pair used for sleeping purposes.

Sitting too closely over the fire, especially when fresh from a walk in the cold, is most injurious to the complexion, making the skin harsh and dry and encouraging premature wrinkles. To retain one’s youthful appearance, the skin must be kept firm and elastic, and anything which helps to induce an unnatural dryness destroys the elasticity.

Complexion in connection with diet. Diet has a great effect upon the complexion. Simple food, as varied as possible, and cooked to perfection, is good for both health and looks. Simple dishes eaten with relish, and digested merrily, not sadly, bring brightness to the eyes and freshness to the cheeks. Most of us eat too much meat and not enough vegetables and fruit. Fresh water-cress is a specially good blood purifier. It should be eaten at breakfast and each meal during the day whenever obtainable, with plenty of salt. See also that it is thoroughly well washed. Not only does water-cress give a clear complexion, but it also produces a fresh, bright colour, as it has the peculiar faculty of absorbing iron from the water in which it grows.

EYES.

An eminent writer has remarked, “Most children are born with light eyes, but a great many of them exchange them for dark eyes as soon as they realise their mistake.” The relative beauty of light or dark eyes is. however, as in every case of individual beauty, merely a matter of taste. Beauty must be “in the eye of the beholder” as well as in the eye that is looked upon. Time was when novelists made the dark-eyed girl “as dark of soul as were her orbs,” while all the virtues were ascribed to the blue-eyed maidens. Thackeray tried to upset this theory by giving his dark-eyed heroines depth of soul and making the blue-eyed damsels treacherous. Be that as it may, the beauty of the eye is not so much a matter of colour as of shape, size, and expression, and the cleanness of the white surrounding the iris. Still, colour is an important factor in the attractiveness of the eye and has to be counted with. Brightness, soulfulness, sympathy, are the leading qualities.

Announcement !

T. H. CAPRON

Cordially invites yen to view everything that is

new in—

DAYTIME FROCKS

SUITS and

ENSEMBLES

TAILORED COATS


EVENING FROCKS RRIDAL WEAR HOSIERY

Showing in the Up-to-date Showroom

93 LIVERPOOL STREET

' I he Spot for Women Who Care” Spoking, 3d. Yard. Same Day Service

♦    X

HOBART’S QUALITY | GROCER    j

W. j. RENNIE j

‘‘Wellington House’ f I 45 LIVERPOOL STREET j

Importer of all Best Brands of • Special Lines from all parts of ?

the World.    i


I ry Our Special Line    of    ?

COFFEE. F reshly Ground    |

and Roasted on the    •

Premises.    ?


A gent for Hanslow’s Bottled Cream and George Farmers Ball arat Bacon and Hams.


We Specialise in

Morning and Afternoon Teas

Pay a Visit when in I own

H. DOWDING

PASTRYCOOK CONFECTIONER. ETC.

105

LIVERPOOL STREET


I elephone 5996


T elephone 3217


C ontractor to all Government Institutions

«

i


To keep the eyes clear and bright they should not be subjected to unnecessary strain. Nothing can be more injurious to the eyes than to strain the sight by reading or working in an uncertain light. Never read in a doubtful light, and always have the light falling upon the book from behind. Do not expose the eyes to the glare of strong sunlight unduly, or to that of brilliantly-illuminated places of assembly; and be careful to protect them from injury by dust and other foreign substances. “Mind your eye” is good homely counsel. Some people suffer from a constant inflammation of the eyes, which not only causes them much discomfort, but seriously detracts from the beauty of the organs of vision. The most efficacious eye-wash in a case like this is a mixture of borax and camphor-water—not spirits of camphor. The proportions should be ten grains of borax to an ounce of camphor water. Always, in making the toilet, carefully bathe the eyes. When the eyes are weak no better or more harmless lotion can be found with which to bathe them than diluted cold tea.

THE EYEBROWS.

The eyebrows can be trained to almost any shape by the exercise of patience and care. When the growth is too thick and bushy, they can be trained with the tips of the fingers to grow in the desired shape. Dip the finger-tips into a little rose-oil before manipulating. When the line is uneven the offending hairs may be removed with a pair of small tweezers, or treated by electrolysis. If the eyebrows are too thin, clip them neatly and cautiously with sharp curved scissors and rub into them a little good cream or vaseline at night. This will in a. short time appreciably improve the growth.

THE EYELASHES.

The longer, thicker, yet silkier the lashes the greater beauty will they lend to the eyes. Clipping the eyelashes once in every two or three months is very beneficial to them. It should, however, be done with extreme care, a pair of curved scissors being used. The tinting or colouration of the eyelashes is all very well, for stage effect: otherwise it is best left alone. Nature provides lashes of the right hue for all eyes; the owners have only to keep them in trim, not try to change their hue.

THE FIGURE.

One ought to make the best of one’s figure. Not by tight-lacing to malform the waist, but by exercise and hygienic living to cultivate symmetry, grace, and correct deportment. Angularity is often as much a matter of habit as of actual physical structure; adiposity, the outgrowth of idleness, “scragginess,” the penalty of neglect. The figure to be clothed should be clothed according to its attributes and contours; not concealed by an imitation of some other person’s habiliments, that other person being, very likely, built on totally differing lines. The tall figure ought not, as a rule, to be dressed in white or very light raiment, or further elongated by towering headgear. Light-coloured, loose clothing will, however, tone down excessive thinness to the eye. The well-proportioned of good average height may wear any material of hues not out of harmony with their complexion, almost any patterns; but the full figure looks best in dark or subdued shades, while striping in the design for the buxom ought to be narrow, and managed in the draping to give length of line up and down, not width-wise. The tall can appropriately have a horizontal trimming and pattern scheme; the dumpy should don the longest and plainest skirts they can carry, eschewing large patterns and criss-cross lines. Short sleeves will not do for the “skinny” and angular, nor will low-cut bodices; but square bodices can be made to cover concavities of collar-bone without advertising their utility in this respect. Waist gatherings may be adjusted to supply a seeming fulness to the frail by the clever costumier, while fold arrangements across the chest can be expertly managed to “suit all figures.” When the feet and ankles are not handsome the skirts may be worn long enough to render the fact unobtrusive, and so on.

THE HAIR.

Rubbing the hair down with a clean silk handkerchief every day, after brushing, has a wonderfully brightening effect. But to keep the hair glossy and bright, it should be well brushed every night with long even strokes of

PALFREYMAN’S THE CORNER

FOR ALL ROUND GOOD VALUE IN

DRAPERY and CLOTHING

AIM STRAIGHT !

THEY GO—

EVERYBODY KNOWS WHERE

LADIES! .

ALWAYS LOOK YOUR BEST !

Advice on all matters appertaining to the Hair and Toilet are given freely at the

“LAVENDER”
TOILET SALON

(Mrs. Sturges, Proprietress)

ELIZABETH STREET, HOBART (opposite G.P.O.) Also at 88b GEORGE STREET, LAUNCESTON

Absolutely the Latest and Smartest in LADIES EIAIR

TRIMMING

Marcel and Water Waving a Speciality

Shampoos, Manicure, Scalp, and Lace Massage

’PHONE 5 734 FOR AN APPOINTMENT

the brush and a strengthening lotion frictioned into it occasionally. An ounce of cantharides mixed with six ounces of castor oil, scented with eau de cologne and rubbed into the roots, is good both for the growth and appearance of the hair. One thing to be remembered about the hair is that it appreciates the air and sunshine as much as do the flowers. In most cases the natural oil of the hair becomes insufficient for its needs in middle life, and it is well to rub into the scalp a little pure olive oil. or to brush the hair twice weekly with a brush dipped in brilliantine. Washing the hair in soda will make it brittle, although it produces a “fluffiness” which many like, and helps the hair to dry easily. Borax has the same good effects without being injurious. The hair should be brushed thoroughly night and morning, not a few hasty whisks of the brush, but long, even strokes, with a firm bristled brush. Whale-bone brushes are good, and brushing continued with one for the space of five minutes will work wonders. Metallic brushes should be avoided. The hair cannot grow at all if the ends are split, and therefore a monthly singeing is advisable. To accomplish this, the hair should be divided into strands, each about the size of the little finger, and twisted hard. Hold the lower end of the strand in the left hand, and pass the partly-closed right hand to the roots, thereby exposing all the unruly ends. With a lighted taper these can be easily singed. 1 do not advise the cutting of the hair, but if it is done, the ends should be cauterised; if not the hair literally ‘“bleeds,” and vitality escapes. There is a system of circulation in each tube of hair, quite similar to that of the human body, and there is no part of the body which responds more gratefully to any attention or care.

Regular Shampooing, once every three weeks or a month, is advisable for the hair. An excellent and inexpensive shampoo can be prepared at home in the following way:—Shave about a pound and a half of pure soap into a quart of hot water, add to it a large teaspoonful of powdered borax and a pint of bay rum. Rub this well into the roots of the hair with gentle friction, rinse out all the soap with warm water, and after it is quite dry, rub a very little rose oil into the roots. This treatment will give the hair a beautiful silky appearance.

Another good hair wash, which may be given with advantage occasionally, is made thus: Pour one quart of -boiling water upon a piece of rock ammonia as large as a filbert, and when cool enough to put tin; hand in, work to a lather by beating. Rub well into the roots of the hair, then into the hair itself. Afterwards wash out the lather with cold water, and also douche with cold.

When the hair appears dry and lifeless after its regular washing, it is a sign that it needs a little tonic, and this can be given it by mixing two tablespoonfuls of castor oil and the same quantity of glycerine into a four-ounce bottle with enough alcohol to cut the oil. Shake the mixture until it is thoroughly mixed, and massage a few drops into the roots of the hair with the tips of the fingers.

To prevent light or golden hair going dark, beat up the yolks of two quite fresh eggs with half an ounce (one tablespoonful) of tincture of Quillaia saponaria, and with a toilet glove rub the whole of this mixture well into the scalp. Next in a quart of hot soft water beat up one ounce of the same tincture, and a heaped tablespoonful of powdered borax (dissolve this first in two tablespoonfuls of tepid water), and then wash the head and hair in the liquid. This will produce a plentiful lather when rubbed into the egg mixture already on the head, and may be removed by copious rinsing, first in hot soft water and then in cooler. Dry with hot towels.

Hair may be kept from going grey prematurely sometimes. Take a wash of alcohol and strong black tea in equal parts. Add to this a little kitchen salt. This forms a simple and harmless remedy, and will often not only arrest the greyness but strengthen the hair and increase its growth.

Grey hair can be made to keep its silvery tone if constantly washed and rinsed in clear water in which a little blue has been shaken.

For falling hair an excellent preparation is made by adding to eight ounces of ¿ilcohol (spirits of wine), half an ounce each of glycerine, spirits of lavender, and tincture of cantharides. Eight grains of sulphate of quinine are then added, and the mixture well shaken. Any perfume desired may hr-used for scenting it, and it should be well rubbed into the hair night and morning.

All Milk Used in Hobart General Hospital and Sanatorium

is supplied by

MR. GEORGE RICHARDSON

of MOUNT PLEASANT ESTATE

and all Cattle from which the Milk is produced are Tubercular Tested, thereby assuring freedom from

disease.

Mr. George Richardson is also Proprietor of the

well-known

TASMANIAN MILK CO.

106 HARRINGTON STREET, HOBART

I elephone 5 i 09

YOUR EYESIGHT !

BUY CORRECTLY FITTED GLASSES.

We strive to enable eyes to see better, nearer, and

farther

J. DICKSON CLARKE

D.B.O.A., F.S.M.C. (London) Consulting Optician

124 COLLINS STREET HOBART

Telephone 3927

SOUPS

STOCK.

Any meat or bones put into a saucepan and well covered with water, seasoned with salt and pepper, and brought to the boil, then allowed to simmer for 4 or 5 hours, is termed stock, and can be used as a foundation for any class of soup.

SCOTCH BROTH.

Two sheep’s heads, 1 pint of water to every 1 lb. of meat or bone, 1 lb. dried peas, 1 turnip, 1 carrot, bouquet giani, 1 onion, 6 cloves, 6 peppercorns, 1 siice bacon, 2 blades mace. Soak the heads in salt and water for I hour; put into a saucepan with the water and boil four hours; strain; cut the best part of the meat from the head and put aside; soak peas all night; next day remove the fat from stock, put stock in a saucepan with the peas, boil three hours, add vegetables, cut into dice; herbs and bacon, boil one hour longer; remove bacon; add chopped parsley and meat from head; cut into dice; serve hot.

ITALIAN SOUP.

Heat 2 qts. white stock, flavoured with vegetables. Strain. When boiling add 2 tablespoonfuls cornflour. Draw aside. Season with pepper and salt. Stir until it thickens. Add 2 well-beaten eggs, find leave it where it will keep hot. Put I teaspoonful grated cheese in tureen and pour soup over it. Stir together and serve.

PLAIN PEA SOUP.

One lb. split peas, I carrot, 1 turnip, 2 onions, \ head celery, I teaspoonful salt, \ teaspoonful pepper, 2 qts. water, and some beef bones. Soak peas for 1 2 hours. Cut all meat from bones. Put into a saucepan with peas and water. Prepare vegetables, and roughly cut up into small dice. \X hen soup boils put in salt. Skim. T hen add vegetables. Simmer gently for 2 hours. Take out bones, and rub soup through a sieve. Re-heat, and if necessary thicken with cornflour. Serve with toast cut into dice, and with dried powdered mint.

EQUATOR SOUPS.

Apricots, cherries, and peaches, etc., make delicious hot weather soups. Peel apricots, boil in plenty water, with cinnamon and lemon peel. Strain syrup through a colander, sweeten to taste, and slightly thicken with cornflour. Serve icy cold, adding a few pieces of the strained fruit to each plate. Peach soup may be treated the same way

RED SOUP.

Soak overnight \ lb. haricot beans in 2 qts. water. Add 1 oz. butter or dripping and boil. Add 2 or 3 tomatoes, I beetroot, small piece of celery, 1 small onion, all sliced, little pepper and salt. Boil for 2\ hours. Press all through a sieve and serve very hot.

TOMATO SOUP.

Into i pint water put 12 tomatoes and 1 large onion cut up.    Boil 1

hour Put through sieve. Bring I qt. milk to boil. To this add 2 oz. butter and thicken with flour. Then add the cooked tomatoes, flavour with pepper and salt. Do not boil the tomatoes and milk together.

OX TAIL SOUP.

Cover with cold season to taste.


-> I


s


Cut up a small ox tail, carrot, turnip, and onion, water. Simmer till quite tender. Strain and remove fat,

THE BEST-ABSOLUTELY !

PURITY GUARANTEED

HI

BF. SURE AND SECURE YOUR REQUIREMENTS FROM YOUR GROCER—ACCEPT NO OTHER !

MODERN HOUSEWIVES!

HAVE YOU SEEN ENGLAND’S LATEST ?

- THE -

estric Uss-kers

They Are Wonderful in Every Detail !

A visit to our Showrooms will convince you that it is only a matter of time before all cooking will be done by the “MAGNET

ELECTRIC COOKERS.

I hey are Hygienic, Easy to Operate, Less Dangerous than other Antiquated Modes of Cooking, and are the Most Economical

Cookers on the Market.

ELECTRICAL AGENCIES

(Proprietors: A. G. WEBSTER & SONS LTD.)

130 COLLINS STREET, HOBART

Sole T asmanian Agents for

BRITISH GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. LTD.

Phone 3789

We Specialise in HOT WATER SERVICES

16

BREAKFAST and ENTREE DISHES

BEEF OLIVES.

O ne ib. topside steak, 5 rashers of bacon, ci little mixed seasoning, 1 oz. dripping. Cut steak into small pieces, place a rasher of bacon and some seasoning on each roll and keep in place with small skewer. Heat dripping in frying pan, braise and brown olives, when brown put into saucepan, pour fat off and make gravy by adding water, pour over olives and simmer until tender. Serve with mashed potatoes.

DAINTY BREAKFAST DISH.

Boil some potatoes, and mash them up. Poach some eggs nicely, and have some finely chopped parsley or mint. Make nice rings of the mashed potatoes, and place on a dish, making a hole in top of each ring sufficient to hold the poached egg. Place dish in stove for a few minutes to brown slightly the potatoes. lake out and serve hot with the chopped parsley or mint, sprinkled over the top of each egg.

STEWED BRAINS (2).

Soak brains in salted water for 30 minutes. Then skin and put into a saucepan with sufficient mi Ik to cover, pepper and salt to taste. When cooked, thicken with flour. Add a small lump of butter and chopped parsley or hard boiled egg.

BAKED EGGS AND BACON.

Mince some bacon, fat and 1 ean together, and put a tablespoonful and two teaspoonfuls of milk into some fireproof egg poachers, and bake in a hot oven from 8 to 10 minutes, then break an egg carefully into each and bake again for five minutes, or until the eggs are set. Sprinkle the tops with finely-chopped parsley and cayenne pepper, and send to table in the poachers.

BACON AND OYSTERS.

Try rashers of bacon and keep them hot between two plates. Have ready some fresh oysters, drained and lightly sprinkled with salt and cayenne pepper; drop them into the hot bacon fat and fry one minute. Dish them upon the bacon and serve at once.

CORNISH PASTIES.

Half ib. steak, 1 potato, I onion, salt and pepper to taste, £lb. short crust. Cut steak into small pieces, peel vegetables and cut into dice, mix all together with salt and pepper. Make short crust, cut into 6 equal parts, roll out into rounds the size of a saucer, put one-sixth of meat mixture on each, glaze half way round, join the edges together on top, glaze with eggs and bake half to three-quarters of an hour in a hot oven, decreasing the heat.

NUT CUTLETS.

I-ry 2 oz. finely-chopped onion in 1 oz. butter to a golden colour. Then add this to 2 oz. mixed milled nuts, 2 oz. fresh white breadcrumbs, \ teaspoonful of mixed herbs, some finely chopped parsley, salt and pepper to taste, and a little Worcestershire sauce. Bind with 1 egg and a little m ilk, if required. Shape into six cutlets, and pass through egg and breadcrumbs, h ry in sufficient fat to cover. When a nice golden brown remove from fat, dra.n, and put a piece of macaroni in the end of each cutlet to resemble the bone. Dish up and serve with tomato sauce and mashed potatoes.

17    .

FOOTWEAR
FOR
ALL
OCCASIONS

AT

CUTHBERTSON’S

141 LIVERPOOL STREET

I he Favourite Store for Drapery

¡KIN’S Pty. Ltd.

Where THE BETTER GOODS are at l HL LOWEST PRICE

125 LIVERPOOL ST. HOBART

I he Largest and Most Up-to-date Fruit Shop in Australia

Arthur Dewhurst

95 ELIZABETH STREET

Soft Drinks, h ruit Salads, Ices, and Sundaes

'Phone 4296

FOR    HOME-MADE    i

CAKES    I

A.    GEORGE    {

I 08 COLLINS STREET |

(Opposite TattersaH’s)    1

English Pork Pies a    I

Speciality    {

BUY YOUR FANCY WORK AT

CONDON’S

ART NEEDLEWORK DEPOT

¡29 LIVERPOOL ST. HOBART

BREAKFAST AND ENTREE DISH ES—Continued PUMPKIN FRITTERS.

One cup pumpkin (cooked), 2 cups flour, teaspoon baking powder, little milk and salt. Mash the pumpkin, add the salt, flour, and powder Moisten with mi lk, make into flat cakes and fry brown.

SARDINE FRITTERS.

Make some fritter batter, skin the sardines, remove the bone and tails, and mash them with a little cayenne pepper and a spoonful of lemon juice; mix with an equal quantity of the batter and fry in tablespoonful of boiling lard. Dish on blotting paper to drain, then pile up on a hot dish and garnish with parsley and small slices of lemon.

SAVOURY QUEEN FRITTERS.

Prepare 6 oz. of fine breadcrumbs and put them into a basin. A halfteaspoonful of grated lemon rind, I eschalot, chopped very fine, 1 teaspoonful mixed herbs, I level teaspoonful salt, and a little pepper. Mix into this | pint of hot milk, and stand this on the side for a few minutes. Stir in the yolks of 2 eggs, and pour this mixture into a well-greased tin. Cover all with a well-greased paper, and bake in a moderate oven for about 45 minutes, or until set. When cold, cut out with a pastry cutter, or cut into squares, and fry to a golden colour in clean hot fat. I his dish may be prepared the previous day, and fried as required.

EGGS A LA NORWAY.

Boil 4 eggs hard, cut in halves, scoop out yolk and mash yolks well with four or five sardines, chopped parsley, and salt and pepper to taste. Till each half white of eggs with the mixture.    Sprinkle with little chopped

parsley, stand between two soup plates over saucepan of boiling water till thoroughly heated and serve.

MACARONI CHEESE.

Quarter lb. macaroni, 2 tablespoonfuls grated rind of cheese broken in sma ii P ieces, I dessertspoonful butter, little pepper and salt. Put macaroni broken up, the cheese, half the butter, and a seasoning of pepper and salt into enough water just to cover, and boil till macaroni is tender and water absorbed. Grease the dish, put in the mixture, put the few breadcrumbs over the top and the remainder of butter, cut up in small scraps. Bake in moderate oven till light brown.

MUSHROOM AND SPINACH.

Combine happily into a main dish. Cook half a pound of peeled mushrooms, broken in pieces, until tender, in two tablespoonfuls of butter and a cupful of thin cream or top milk. Thicken with two tablespoonfuls each of butter and flour cooked together, adding more milk if needed to make the right consistency. Season with half a teaspoonful of salt and an eighth teaspoonful of pepper.    Meanwhile cook a quarter peck of well-washed

spinach until tender; drain, chop fine, season well and press into a buttered ring mould. Unmould on a hot chop p!a*e and fill the centre with the creamed mushrooms.

MUSHROOMS EN BROCHETTE.

Select very large mushrooms, wash, peel, and cook in boiling water for ten minutes. Alternate these with oysters and squares of thin bacon on skewers. Lav them on a shallow pan and bake them in a hot oven—450 degrees F.—for a’ out fifteen minutes, or until the bacon is crisp and the ovsters plumped. Serve on strips of toast and pour the pan of dripping over all.

Mrs. M. H. TAYLOR) '?k~*55 ~    f CECIL CRACKNELL

99 LIVERPOOL STREET


f A I TAILOR and MERCER

Sole Agent for BON TON and

ROYAL WORCESTER

Corsets, Corselettes, etc.


I 73 ELIZABETH ST.

HOBART


He is noted for good material and workmanship


t    •

The Motor Hospital i Pay a v,s,t to~

37-43 Melville st., Hobart | Miss J. Hannabury

For

LADIES’ and CHILDREN’S HIGH-CLASS MILLINERY, HOSIERY, and FANCY GOODS


Wireless and Car Battery Charging

All Electrical and Mechanical Re-pairs

SPARE PARTS—New and

Second-hand    J

TYRES-—New and Second-hand i

TRUCKS—We Specialise in • Transport

Old Bell Chamb ers


’Ph one 3829

Adams & Shalless ! Ca" and Inspect our Larg

Stocks of New and Second-


all ana inspect our Lartre


Pty. Ltd.

85 COLLINS STREET


Hand burniture


For

A.S.C.O. Electric Hot Water Systems

bully Gu a ran teed See Us


A. H. PURDY’S

CENTRAL MART 65 COLLINS STREET (Below Elizabeth St.)


EASY TERMS ARRANGED


MEAT

ABERDEEN SAUSAGE.

One lb. steak, lemon, pepper, salt, roll with flour. Tie


\ lb. fat bacon, minced, 2 cups breadcrumbs, rind of 1 tablespoonful tomato sauce, fried with egg, form into in a cloth and boil for 2 hours.

ALL BLAZE.

Remove ail excessive fat from I ^ lb. of breast or neck of mutton, cut into 2 in. squares; put into a pot, and cover with water. Bring to the boil, ana refresh it under cold water. Put back on to the fire with enough water to cover. Add one-th:rd oz. of salt to 1 quart of liquor, garnish with two bay leaves, a few rough pieces of celery, thyme, and parsley stalks; tie these up together so they can be removed before serving. Allow this to cook for 30 minutes, then add four onions of even size, and 1 lb. potatoes; let this simmer for 1 hour, then remove the fat and add 5 tomatoes. Allow to cook until all is done. W hen dishing up sprinkle with a little fresh chopped parsley.

BEEF SAUCE WITH CARROTS.

Cut 1 lb. stewing steak into 2 oz. pieces, fry them in 2 oz. fat; when a nice colour add 3 onions, 4 carrots cut into 1 in. pieces (the carrot must only be J in. thick). Allow this to cook in the fat for 5 minutes, then put on 2 oz. flour and mix well together, stirring over the .fire for a few minutes. Put this into a fairly deep saucepan and cover with stock or water. Add 4 tomatoes or a little tomato puree, bring to the boil, garnish with thyme, bay leaf, and celery stalks tied together. Allow this to cook until steak is tender, then remove the garnish, skim off the fat, season to taste, and serve very hot.

CASSEROLE OF BEEF.

Two cupfuls of boiled rice, same quantity of thinly sliced beef or mutton, 2 onions, 1 cupful gravy, some chopped parsley, butter, salt, and pepper. Grease a casserole or piedish, put in a layer of rice, then some thin slices of meat and onion in thin rings, season with salt, pepper, and parsley. Continue till all is used, having rice for top layer; add gravy, cover with greased paper, and bake in a moderate oven 45 to 50 minutes. Serve from casserole or piedish.

BRAISED BEEF WITH CABBAGE.

Put into baking tin 2 oz. onion, 2 oz. celery, 2 oz. carrot, 1 bay leaf, sprig of thyme. Cut up roughly I lb. of braising steak into 2 oz. pieces, and 2 oz. fat. Allow this to cook in the oven for 10 minutes. Put into a stew pan, season with salt and pepper, and more stock if required to cover. Bring to the boil, and simmer for 30 minutes. Now pick out the meat and put into a clean pan with 1 cabbage washed and cut into four. Strain the liquor over this, and simmer gently until both are cooked; then dish up the beef, ana garnish all round with the cabbage; thicken the liquor if required and pour a little over, and hand the other round when serving.

GERRARD STEAK.

Take 1 lb. steak and rub with a mixture made of 1 teaspoonful of flour, sugar and vinegar, \ teaspoon of salt and of pepper. Put into a dish, make another mixture, 2 teaspoonfuls vinegar and of Worcester Sauce, £ gill water. Four over steak and cook in a covered dish one and a half hours.

McCLUSKEY

AND

BETTS

41 ELIZABETH STREET

NO- I ONE” Hosiery, G1 oves, and Und erwear Specialists

WE SPECIALISE INREMOVALS

Bur charges are moderate, and every care is taken with furniture and other goods

Andrew Mathers

62 COLLINS STREET I elephone 3902 (all hours)

Ì he London-American Tailors

Suits to Measure English W orsieds from

£5/5. 0 to £8/10/0 COLLINS STREET

(Next Imperial)

A Charming Hat is Everything to a Woman’s Appearance

It counts more than any other item of dress, and it is, therefore, essential to the woman who cares to see that her hat is of a style that will add charm and character to her appearance

Latest Modes procurable from

B. SARGENT

“THE BIJOUNE”

!!• LIVERPOOL STREET (Next to Palfreyman’s)

Specialists in Children’s Wear and Exclusive Frocks

OUR SPECIALITY—    \

100 PER CENT. WHOLEMEAL ?

BREAD    f

i

I

R. Spencer Pty. Ltd.:

BAKERS, PASTRYCOOKS, and CONFECTIONERS

81 MACQUARIE ST.

HOBART

(Opposite Museum) Telephone 6128

"FISH MAKES BRAINS"

And is also wholesome, easily digested, and nourishing to the body.

All kinds of

Fish always obtainable from

CASIMATY BROS.

BRITANNIA CAFE

35 ELIZABETH STREET HOBART

Dial 4712

oo


FISH

TO FILLET A FISH.

Cut the skin down the back, across both sides of the head, across the tail, on both sides of the fins, and down the front. Loosen the skin at the head on both sides, and draw sharply ofT with the aid of a cloth, wipe the oil away.

FRIED FISH.

Wash and dry the fish, cut off fins, cut into suitable sized pieces. Roll in flour, pepper and salt, dip in egg glazing or milk, roll in breadcrumbs and press them on firmly. Make the fat smoking hot in a frying pan and place fish in; fry from 5 to 10 minutes.

FISH LOAF.

One cup shredded fish (any kind may be used), 5 boiled potatoes (which have been put through a ricer), 1 cup cooked rice, 1 cup of finely diced celery, 2 eggs, \ cup milk, 1 teaspoonful salt, 1-8 teaspoonful pepper. Combine the ingredients in the order given. Place in a well-oiled bread pan in the form of a loaf. Bake in a moderate oven for 35 minutes. Serve with a cheese sauce.

FISH MOULD.

Three-quarter lb. of cooked white fish, 2 oz. boiled rice, £ pint white sauce, 1 gill cream or milk, £ gill of water, £ oz. gelatine, cayenne, salt, pepper.    Free the fish from skin and bone, and put it through a mincer, or

rub through a sieve.    Mix it with the rice, sauce, and cream or mi lk,

and make hot. Dissolve the gelatine in the water and strain in, season well. Put it into a mould rinsed out in cold water, and decorated with fancy shapes of beetroot, and leave in a cold place. W hen set, turn out and garnish with mustard and cress or parsley.

FISH MACARONI.

These quantities are for a meal to serve six persons. Break up £ lb. macaroni, and boil for 20 to 30 minutes in salted water. Th en fla ke 1 lb. cooked fish, remove the bones and skin, mix with the macaroni, and season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Line a piedish and fill in wi th th e mixture, pour over a thin white sauce, sprinkle with plenty of cheese and oily butter, and bake in a fairly good oven for 1 0 to 15 minutes.

PANFISH.

Have ready £ lb. cooked fish. T ry to a golden colour 2 oz. chopped onion in 1 oz. butter, boil 1 oz. rice, plain, drain, and a dd to th e onion, wi th 4 oz. mashed potatoes, and mix well with the fish. Add 1 oz. butter, season to taste, place in a piedish, sprinkle with breadcrumbs and oiiy butter, and bake to a nice golden colour.

LOBSTER SAUCE.

Chop up half a lobster in a pint of white sauce (made with milk, cornflour, and butter), and add a little lemon and a little cayenne pepper. Boil for 1 5 minutes.

FISH PUDDING.

Cook 1 lb. schnapper, and when cool flake it up and mix with 2 oz. breadcrumbs, 1 gill of melted butter sauce, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful chopped parsley, and a little pepper and salt. Then pour into a buttered mould, and steam for £ hour; turn out, and serve with butter sauce.

POULTRY

TO MAKE AN OLD FOWL TENDER.

Prepare for cooking the night before, soak overnight in a deep dish with rather strong baking soda in water.

CHICKEN EN CASSEROLE AND JELLIED CHICKEN CONSOMME

are made from 2 chickens. Cut them as for frying and make the consomme from the necks, backs, gizzards, the blanched feet, tips of wings, w^ater and seasonings. Simmer for three hours, strain, cool, and if not stiff enough reheat and add \ a teaspoonful of granulated gelatine in the usual way. The casserole uses up the rest of the chicken and may be made up early in th e day, for it is even better for long, slow cooking and re-heating. Brown the chicken and arrange it in the casserole with plenty of seasonings, a cupful each of tomato juice and the consomme, and add I \ cupfuls of mushrooms \ an hour before it is done.

CHICKEN ARMENIAN.

Prepare a fowl of about 6 lb. for roasting as usual. For the stuffing drop a cupful of rice into boiling water and cook for 1 5 minutes. Drain and add to it I teaspoonful salt, I -8 teaspoonful of pepper, } teaspoonful sage, I fresh or \ cupful canned tomatoes, finely chopped, a medium onion, chopped, h cupful almonds, blanched and chopped, the chicken liver, cooked and minced, and \ cupful of raisins. Stuff the chicken with this mixture, taking care to fill it no more than ;{ full, for the rice will swell quite a lot more. Sew up the opening and truss in the usual way. Put the prepared fowl into a kettle of boiling water and cook until it is tender. Remove, rub with 3 tabiespoonfuis of butter combined with 1 tablespoonful of flour and

one teaspoonful salt and place in the top of a hot oven 300 degrees F.

to brown. Turn if necessary to brown evenly on all sides. Garnish with whole carrots and parsley. This is the way we cooked our hens in old Armenia, and they were always so delicious. The water in which the chicken has been cooked makes an excellent broth or soup foundation. Use your pressure cooker, steamer, or fireless cooker, for this recipe if you own any one of these.

ROAST GOOSE.

When selecting the goose, take care it is white-skinned, plump of breast, with feet that are pliable and yellow. Clean and singe it well, piucking out all pin feathers. fhen wash it inside and out, dry thoroughly and hang in a cold place for at least 1 2 hours. I he stuffing may be made like that

suggested for the pig, or, if preferred, in the following manner:-Boil 3

medium-sized onions in salt water for 1 0 minutes, then drain and chop them fine, and add them to 4 cupfuls of soft breadcrumbs with a teaspoonful of dried sage well crumbled, 3 tablespoonfuls of melted butter, and salt and pepper to taste. Moisten with a well-beaten egg, and stuff the breast only

0    f the goose. f- ill up the body of the goose with tiny onions and inch

lengths of celery which have been parboiled five minutes and seasoned. Sew up the openings and truss neatly. Rub all over with Hour and place breast downward, in a dripping pan; brown delicately in a hot oven-500 degrees F.

1    hen lower the heat of the oven to 400 degrees F., turn the goose on its back, and cook for two or three hours or longer, according to the size of the bird. Season after an hour s cooking. Make a rich brown gravy of part of the fat in the pan and serve in a gravy boat, adding the giblets which have been simmered until tender, and finely chopped.

VEGETABLES

HOW TO COOK VEGETABLES.

All root with lid on. fast with the boiled in. P fat.


vegetables should be put into boiling water and boiled slowly All green vegetables should be put into boiling water and boiled lid off. All vegetables should have salt in the water they are eas and broad beans should have a little sugar, and beans a little

MIDDLESEX ONIONS.

Make a white sauce in the following manner:—Melt a quarter cupful butter in a double boiler and rub into it £ cupful flour. Season with | teaspoonful of salt and l -8 teaspoonfu! of pepper. Now add gradually 1 pint mi lk and stir until it is smooth and thickened. Cook four medium-sized onions, first chopped, in boiling salted water for five minutes, drain. Add to the white sauce. Pour over four sliced hard-cooked eggs in a casserole. Sprinkle the top with fine buttered crumbs and bake, covered, in a hot oven— 400 d egrees F.—for 30 minutes. Uncover and continue the baking until nicely browned.

LEFT OVER VEGETABLES.

M ash up together vegetables, such as cauliflower and sauce, pumpkin and potatoes. Put all into a piedish, which has been greased with butter. Sprinkle with pepper and salt and place small lumps of butter on top. E3ake until nicely browned in a hot oven.

1 IF IT'S A PRINCE TALKIE IT'S THE BEST !    TALKIE IN TOWN

Macquarie Street, Hobart—Just Below General

Post Office

THE SHOW PLACE OF TASMANIA

Presenting

FOX MOVIETONE TALKING PICTURES METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER TALKING PICTURES WESTERN ELECTRIC SOUND REPRODUCTION TED McCANN'S ORCHESTRA

Family Parties and Invitation Entertainments a Specialty

i TELEPHONE 3868 TO SOLVE THAT j i    SOCIAL OBLIGATION    i

BAKED SQUASH.

Bake \ of a fine Hubbard squash, with seeds removed, until tender. Scrape all possible from shell and add-to about 1 quart of squash—2 table

spoonfuls each of butter and thick cream, to a teaspoonful of brown sugar, quarter teaspoonful ginger, and salt to taste; mash, beat until light and smooth, place in a serving dish, smooth with a knife into a mound, pepper in spots over the top and serve hot. .

CELERIED PEAS.

Into a mixing bowl put 2 cupfuls of freshly cooked green peas or the same amount of canned peas drained from their liquid. Season with \ teaspoonful salt and 1 -8 teaspoonful pepper. Then stir in 1 cupful or more of diced, cooked celery, mixed with \\ cupfuls medium white sauce. Turn the mixture into a buttered baking dish of medium size and scatter buttered

breadcrumbs over the top. Bake uncovered in a hot oven-425 degrees F.-

for 20 minutes or until heated through and nicely browned. One or two quartered hard-boiled eggs may be added.

CHEESED CARROTS.

Mix 1 tablcspoonful flour with half a cupful of mild cheese, finely chopped or grated, \ teaspoonful salt, and 4 cupful of milk. Put into a mediumsized casserole and mix we 11. Th en stir in 1 cupful of macaroni, broken into small pieces and cooked, and | cupful of diced, cooked ciirrots. Slip the

dish, covered, into a hot oven—400 degrees F.-to bake for 20 minutes.

Serve piping hot. 1 wice the rule makes a better amount for six as a main dish.

SALADS

CHEESE AND TOMATO SALAD.

Arrange alternate layers of sliced tomatoes, lettuce, and hard-boiled egg. Spread over all about half an inch of thick grated cheese; chill and serve with salad dressing.

FRIED PEANUT SALAD.    .

B1 anch and chop a cupful of raw peanuts. Place in a frying pan with a tablespoonful of 3alad oil, or olive oil if preferred. Sprinkle with salt and heat slowiy, stirring constantly until the nuts ¿»re delicately browned. Be sure they are only a delicate colour, for the hot oil continues to brown them even after they are removed from the fire. Cool on brown paper. Meanwhile, scald, peel, and chill six tomatoes. Hollow' out their centres and fill with the nuts and an equal quantity of diced celery. Serve in nests of lettuce with a sweetened French dressing made by adding a teaspoonful of sugar to each quarter cupful of the dressing. An easier way to prepare the salad is to heap the nut and celery mixture on thickly sliced tomatoes. Roasted peanuts may be used if they are first blanched, and then crushed with a rolling pin, but the flavour produced is not quite the same. (Recipe by courtesy of Miss 1. Daley.)

CHEESE SALAD.    .

Half a pound of stale cheese, one lettuce, yolk of a hard-boiled egg, one tal lespoonfu 1 of salad oil, one tablespoonfu! of vinegar, one teaspoonful of sugar, one teaspoonful of made mustard, add salt and pepper. Put the oil in a basin with the yolk of egg, work them together with a wooden spoon, add the salt, pepper, mustard, and sugar. Grate the cheese finely, add it, and, lastly add the vinegar gradually. Arrange lettuce leaves as a border round some small plates, and put a little heap of the cheese mixture in the centre.

CELERY AND TOMATO SALAD.

Peel six firm tomatoes and remove the cores by cutting out the stem ends. Chop into sma n P ieces about half head of celery, preferably using the smaller and more tender stalks. Place the celery in the tomatoes and allow to stand on ice until slightly chilled. Arrange on lettuce leaves and pour over each two or three teaspoonfuls of mayonnaise dressing and serve.

BACON AND LETTUCE SALAD

is a very good dinner salad. To make cut \ lb. of bacon into dice and fry until crisp. Remove from the fat and keep warm. Pour the fat gradually over a beaten egg, adding half a teaspoonful of mustard, two tablespoonfuls of vinegar and three tablespoonfuls of cream. Return to a slow heat for a few minutes, stirring constantly until it is smooth and thick, then pour over head lettuce which has been cut in rather small pieces. Garnish with the crisp bacon.

MAYONNAISE DRESSING.

One egg, I tablespoon sugar, 1 saltspoon salt, 1 mustardspoon made mustard, lump of butter size of a walnut, 3 tablespoons vinegar, 2 tablespoons water. Beat egg, then add all other ingredients. Mix together, stand in a jug in a saucepan of boiling water, stir for about 5 or 10 minutes till it appears like a boiled custard.

o-e.

*


E. CHANCELLOR

Corner DAVEY and MURRAY STREETS

HOBART

ALL BRANDS OF WINES, SPIRITS, ALES, ETC.,

KEPT IN STOCK

PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO ORDERS

SPRINGVALE TEA

Pure Ceylon, in 3 lb. boxes, lead lined, best quality.

“MERCURY” Brand Cider

made from the best Tasmanian Apples. “A glass a day keeps

bad health away.”

SCHWEPPES’ Dry Ginger Ale

Orange Palato, Lemonade, Soda Sarto-the best Aerated Waters

obtainable

••••*'. {»a..#..»..»..#..»..«..«..*..#..»..*.

PUDDINGS and SWEET DISHES

NOUGAT TART.

Line a plate or tin with thin pastry and spread very lightly wi th jam.

Then fill the tart with the following mixture:-2 cups desiccated cocoanut,

I cup sugar, 2 teaspoons baking powder. Sift these well together and moisten with a well beaten egg and 1 tablespoon of milk. Bake for three-quarters of an hour in a very slow oven. Should be a nice golden brown.

APPLE SHORT CAKE.

One lb. of flour, £ lb. of butter, 3 tablespoons of sugar, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon of baking powder, and 4 tablespoons of milk, or perhaps a little more will be required. Rub the butter into the flour and add all the dry ingredients. Beat the eggs and milk together, then mix all into a nice, soft paste. Divide in half, roll out, put half of it into a greased baking tin. Cover with the apples, thinly sliced, and a small quantity of sugar. Roll out the rest of the paste, and cover the apples.

APPLE MERINGUE.

I wo cups of stewed apple, 3 eggs (divide the w'hites from the yolks), half-cup of white sugar, 1 teaspoonful of butter, a few drops of almond essence. Prepare the apples as you would for making a pie, and stew them to a pulp.    Sweeten to taste, and while hot beat in the yolks of the eggs very

lightly. Put into a buttered piedish and bake for ten minutes. Cover with a meringue made of the beaten whites of the eggs and two tablespoons of white sugar, and a few drops of almond flavouring. Spread over evenly, and quickly shut the oven, just to cook it a golden browm.

BANANA PUDDING (Hot).

Simmer the thin peel of a lemon, and a tiny piece of cinnamon in half pint of milk, till well flavoured; then add to it 3 oz. of sugar, and when this is dissolved pour it into another pan, in which 3 oz. butter and 3 oz. flour have been heated, and stir till the    mixture boils.    Remove    the    pan    from the

fire, and leave to cool a little. I    hen crush    six    ripe bananas    fine,    and add

to them the strained juice of three lemons and I oz. of sugar. Take half the quantity of crushed bananas and    add it to    the    mixture.    Beat    the two

eggs well. 1 hen butter a mould,    and line it    prettily with    chopped    almonds

and preserved fruit. Pour in the mixture gently, cover with the buttered paper, and steam it for 1 £ hours. 7 urn out carefully on a hot dish and serve with sweet sauce.

URNEY PUDDING.

Two eggs, lb. flour, 2 oz. sugar, 1 tablespoonful jam, 1 teaspoonful baking powder, or £ teaspoonful soda, and 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar. Grease a basin, beat butter and sugar to a cream, then add eggs one by one, stir in the flour and baking powder, then add the jam. Put the mixture into a basin, cover with a buttered pciper, and steam for an hour and a half. Sauce: f Ialf pint of water, 1 tablespoonful arrowroot, 1 dessertspoonful sugar, 1 tablespoonful jam and a little cochineal. Put the water or milk on to boil. Mbx arrowroot with a little cold water. Stir it into the boiling water, then add jam, sugar, and colouring. Strain round pudding. (Recipe by courtesy of Mrs. A. Lake.)

SCONES

SYRUP SCONES.

Take 2 tablespoonfuls sugar, the same of syrup, 1 teaspoonful each of bi-carbonate of soda, cream of tartar, ginger, cinnamon, 2 oz. margarine, 3 teacupfuls flour. Put all in a bowl, except flour and syrup, and stir in cupful of water (almost boiling), add syrup, keep stirring as it troths up. Add flour, and put in two large round greased tins. Bake in a hot oven.

CHEESE SCONES.

One cupful grated cheese, 1^ cupfuls self-raising flour, a pinch of salt and cayenne, 1 egg and a little butter. Rub butter into flour, add cheese, cayenne, and salt, blend well together, beat up egg and add enough milk to make flour into light dough. Cut into oblong lengths, about an inch wide and 1 £ inches long. Brush over with milk or egg. Bake in a brisk oven for 12 minutes. To be buttered and eaten hot. 1'hey may be reheated at any time by dipping the tops in milk and putting in hot oven for 3 minutes.

BISCUITS

SAVOURY BISCUITS.

Put 8 oz. of flour into a basin, rub in 2 oz. of butter till quite smooth, add 2 oz. of finely-grated cheese, add a pinch of salt, cayenne pepper, and the juice of \ a lemon, and mix well together with the yolk of 1 egg and a little milk. Then put on to a floured board. Roll out thinly, and cut into shape required. Put on to a buttered and floured tin. and bake in a moderate oven until crisp and brown.

PEANUT COOKIES.

One tablespoonful butter or other shortening, 2 tablespoonfuls sugar, 1 egg, 2 tablespoonfuls milk, \ cup flour, £ teaspoonful baking powder, \ teaspoonful salt, \ cup chopped peanuts. Cream shortening, add sugar, well beaten egg, milk and flour which has been mixed and sifted with baking powder and salt. Add chopped peanuts last. Drop from a teaspoon on oiled tins. Recipe makes three dozen cookies.

BUTTER BISCUITS.

One cup butter, 1 cup sugar, \ cup milk, 2 teaspoonfuls cream of tartar, I teaspoonful baking soda and enough flour to make a stiff dough. Mix together butter and sugar, add milk, then flour, etc. Make them into a stiff dough. Roll out and cut into shapes and bake in a quick oven.

SCOTCH PANCAKES.

Rub I teaspoonful of carbonate of soda, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, 1 teaspoonful of salt, and 1 tablespoonful of sugar together, mix this thoroughly with 1 lb. of flour; beat 1 egg, and mix it with as much milk as will make the whole into a nice batter; drop a tablespoonful of it into a frying pan, lightly greased. Turn, and when done put the cakes on a folded cloth to steam; and when cold serve for tea. It will be seen that the term pancakes in this case does not describe the “flap-jack” pancake eaten hot with lemon juice and sugar.

SAVOURIES

ANCHOVY EGGS.

I lard boil as many eggs as required, cut in halves, remove yolk and beat it up with a little butter, anchovy, or tomato sauce, pepper and salt. Replace in whites and serve each \ egg on a slice of toast. Garnish with a little chopped parsley.

NUT TOMATOES

make another good savoury dish. Take 6 tomatoes and scoop out the middles. Mix 2 oz. of any kind of ground nuts and 1 oz. breadcrumbs. Th en add an egg and a tablespoonful of milk. Stir up these ingredients, and fill th e tomato shells with the mxiture. Put the shells on to a baking tin and cook them in a moderate oven for fifteen minutes. Make a sauce, and put it inside the tomatoes.

WELSH RAREBIT.

Put I tablespoon butter in a saucepan, add 3 oz. grated cheese, 2 tablespoonfuls cream, 1 small teaspoon mixed mustard, stir over the fire till well mixed and smooth, add I well beaten egg. Serve on buttered toast.

BARLEY AND CHEESE SAVOURY.

Boil 1 cup pearl parley in water for 1 0 minutes, strain the water off, and put in a quart of cold water and boil for 2 hours; then strain off the water (save it), add I cupful of grated cheese, a knob of butter, and salt and pepper to tiiste. Put the mixture into a pie dish, sprinkle with grated cheese and oily butter. Brown in a hot oven, and serve hot.

SATURDAY NIGHT RELISH.

I ifteen ripe tomatoes, 6 onions, 2 tablespoonfuls salt, 6 sour apples, 3 green peppers, 2 tablespoonfuls brown sugar, quarter teaspoonful cayenne pepper, I cupful vinegar. Prepare the fruit and vegetables as usual, chop fine, and cook all the ingredients together for about one and a half hours. This relish is so called because it is especially delicious when served with Boston baked beans.

CHEESE STRAWS.

Two oz. flour, 2 oz. butter, 2 oz. breadcrumbs, 3 oz. grated cheese, pepper and salt. Mix flour and butter, add breadcrumbs, cheese, pepper, and salt to taste. Mix into a paste and roll out. Cut into strips. Place on greased tray and bake in a slow oven until light brown.

SAVOURY PUDDING.

Peel 2 or 3 large onions, boil until tender, pour off water, chop very fine. C hop 2 oz. of suet, crumble, 4 oz. of bread, \ oz. of thyme, 1 oz. of sage, and 1 egg, pepper and salt to taste. Mix all together, put a small piece of dripping into a meat tin, when hot put in the pudding, and bake for about an hour in a moderate oven. This is delicious served with a good gravy.

SAVOURY TOMATOES.

Put alternate layers of tomatoes and breadcrumbs in a greased piedish. Sprinkle with a few herbs, pepper and salt. Place lumps of butter on top and bake in oven.

FEEDING AND CARE OF BABY

Breast-feeding is the ideal method of nourishing infanis. It is Nature s way, which cannot be improved on. But, unfortunately, there are many things which may prevent the mother from feeding her baby :n the natural manner. Her milk may be lacking in quantity, poor in quality, or entirely absent. In any of these cases it is imperative that suitable nourishment be provided.

Lactogen is the most perfect substitute for mothers mi.k that can be made. It is prepared from perfevitly fresh, pure, country milk, modified in composition to make it similar to human milk in nutritive properties and easy digestibility, and exactly suitable to the needs of the most delicate infants.

WEANING.

The proper time to wean a baby is between the ninth and ten th months of infancy, for mother’s milk is only naturally designed to supply a baby’s entire needs for about this period, aftsr which a more varied diet becomes necessary.

In cases where the mother’s health is unable to stand the strain of nursing for so long a period as nine months, earlier weaning must be carried out, and sometimes owing to ili-heaith or other cause it is necessary to wean baby quite suddenly. In such cases "Lactogen is the best food to employ as babies tolerate it far better than ordinary mi.k.

if the mother’s supply of milk be abundant, and the child th riving, it is not advisable to commence weaning during very hot weather, and this may be delayed until it becomes cooler. Wean ,ng should be postponed if a tooth is just appearing, and also during or after any acute illness of the child.

The weaning process should preferably occupy about a month if the mother has a good supply of milk. One bottle feeding is sufficient for the first few days, then two are given, and the number gradua ily increased so that baby will gradually and insensibly become quite accustomed to the bottle.

DIET AFTER WEANING.

At nine months of age, or when the child is weaned, barley, rice, or oatmeal water may be used to dissolve the "Lactogen," starting with one bottle so prepared per day. Baked breadcrumbs, rusks, or milk arrowroot biscuits, crushed with a rolling-pin, may now be mixed with "Lactogen," and thin arrowroot and sago given as a change Dry biscuits can be sparingly given when the teeth are developed, but the baby must not be allowed to cram his mouth. Mutton broth, of je Ily made of shank, knuckles or rabbit may be given in place of a bottle once daily when the child is about 1 0 months of age. Th e meals should not number more than five.

At nine months baby may be given a dry crust or pieces of bread cut into fingers about three-quarters of an inch thick and baked in a slow oven, on which to exercise his teeth. 1 hese should be given him to bite about a quarter hour before meals and not between feeds. Never leave baby alone with crusts in case a piece should get down the throat.

Introduce all new foods slow!}', one at a time and little to begin with. A1 so do not let baby acquire the habit of refusing food because it is strange, for with perseverance babies soon like anything that is good for them.

After twelve months a more mixed diet can be given. Besides adding stale bread, baked breadcrumbs, or rusks to the milk for two feedings, another meal may consist of broth and baked breadcrumbs, another may be thickened by the addition of such foods as sago, maizena, or custard; but the last feed should consist only of "Lactogen,’’ with perhaps a biscuit. Baked apple and small quantities of yolk of egg may also be given daily if found to agree with the child, and a very little bread and butter may also be fed. At fifteen months a lightly boiled or poached egg with bread crumbs may be given, and at eighteen months finely scraped pulped meat may be given once daily in gradually increasing quantities; also milk puddings may be added to the diet. At this age green vegetables and potatoes may be sparingly given. Children require plenty of water to drink, but tea and coffee should never be given. Meals should be regular and no snacks allowed between these.

A void young chlidren cultivating too early a desire for cakes or sweets.

the following table:—•

BABY’S WEIGHT.

1 he average weight of a new-born infant is about seven pounds. If the child is healthy and properly fed it ought to gain weight in accordance with


At I 2 mon ths.......... 2 1 lb. I Ooz.

At    9    months.......... 181b.    7 oz.

At    6    months.......... 151b.    6oz.

At    3    months.......... 121b.    8oz.

At    14    days............ 71b.    14oz.

At    birth.............. 71b.    8oz.

A baby should be weighed every fortnight, and a record kept of its weight. If it is not getting on you may be sure there is something wrong in your system of feeding, and you should try a change of diet. Of course, if a child is very small at birth it will weigh less in proportion than the above table, while a very big child may weigh more, but the rate of increase ought to be about the same.

HOW TO TEST BABY’S BATH.

Never try baby's bath with your hand, for the skin is so hardened that it does not feel the heat properly. Always test the bath with your elbow, which will give you a much better idea of how warm the water will feel to baby s tender little body.

PURE AIR AND SUNSHINE.

God lent His creatures light and air,

And waters open to the skies,

Man locks him in a stifling lair-

And wonders why his brother dies.

-Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes.

Babies pine and die because they are irregularly and wrongly fed, and kept indoors in warm, stuffy rooms instead of living outside in the open air and sunlight by day, and pure, cool, fresh, free-flowing air at night. Keep baby out of the direct line of draught, but don’t be frightened of the air being cold. Pure, cold air is invigorating, and prevents “catching cold.” Warm, stuffy air is poisonous and devitalising, and makes babies liable to catch cold” when taken out into the open. 1 here is no danger, but actual safety, in free-flowing night air.

The new-born babe needs special care and attention. For the first few days it is as well to have a fire in the bedroom in cold weather; but, unless for special reasons, this is not advisable after a week or ten days. Even when there is a fire, the room must not be allowed to warm up much, but must have a very free flow of pure open air through it day and night. See that the baby is sufficiently covered with light, open, fluffy, or porous woollen materials, and, if necessary, use a hot bottle as well.

N.B.-A bciby must never sleep in bed with its mo ther.

FRUIT JUICE FOR BABY.

f resh orange juice should be used if the fruit is procurable, but the juice from pineapples or other sweet fruits may be employed, also that from ripe tomatoes, which are particularly rich in vitamins. Always wash the fruit and strain the juice before using. A little sugar may be added to sweeten with advantage. Give from half a teaspoonful to two tablespoonfuls three times a day, according to age, about an hour before meals. When fruit juice is given for constipation, give from two teaspoonfuls to one tablespoonful in the early morning. When giving fruit juice to very young babies, it is wise to add boiled water to the juice to dilute it so that half fruit juice an d half water is given to begin with. Fruit juice should be given to every baby when th ree months old, whether breast or bottle fed.

LACTOGEN

THE NATURAL MILK FOOD FOR INFANTS

AND INVALIDS

“LACTOGEN” NURSING SERVICE

All mothers are invited to avail themselves of the services of our experienced staff of qualified nurses who are specially retained to furnish free advice on the feeding of infants. The advice of our ''Lactogen” nurses may be obtained either by personal consultation or by reply to a letter forwarded to

133 BATHURST STREET, HOBART

And

10 LOWER GEORGE STREET, LAUNCESTON

BEFORE BUYING CROCKERY & GLASSWARE

Pay a ' Visit to the

"CHEAPEST PLACE ON EARTH"

OAKES

LIVERPOOL STREET (Near Harrington Street)

If You Want the BEST Ask for

Devonport Butter

Obtainable all Leading Grocers

R. G. ROGERS & SON ’Phone 4274

“MEN’S WEAR”

(Registered)

! 20 ELIZABETH STREET

(Opposite G.P.O.)

MEN’S SUITS

£2/15/-,    £3/10/-,    £3/15/-,

£4/10/-

MEN’S SPORTS CLOTHING, i    TROUSERS,

i 13/6, 16/6, 19/6, 22/6, 24/6.

| COATS, 26/6, 35/-, 37/6, 45/-

1    Everything for Men

J. STUBBINGS

Russell Allport & Co Pty. Ltd.

Mechanical and Electrical Engineers, Iron and Brass Founders, Machinery

Merchants, etc.    .

45-47 MELVILLE ST. HOBART

CREDIT FOR ALL

A Special “No Deposit” Offer Monster Manchester Parcel £4/19/6

Contains-


I PAIR PURE WHITE TASMANIAN OR AUSTRALIAN WOOL BLANKETS, Soft Fleecy Finish, Full Double-bed Size. 72 in. x 90 in. Weight, 74 lb.

I PAIR LINEN-FINISH TWILL SHEETS, guaranteed free from filling. Full Double-bed Size, 80 in. x 90 in., hemmed readv for use.

1    GOOD QUALITY WHITE HONEYCOMB QUILT, Full Double

bed Size, 70 in. x 90 in., exclusive of fringes.

2    HEMSTITCHED AND TAPED PILLOW CASES, a beautiful

quality, guaranteed to wear; size, 20 in. x 30 in.

2 COLOURED TURKISH TOWELS, splendid quality, with smart patterns; size, 20 in. x 40 in.

2 WHITE TURKISH TOWELS, nicely woven, in the same size, 20 in. x 40 in.

2i YARDS SNOW WHITE TABLE DAMASK, extra special quality, with wonderful designs; extra wide, 64 in.

The price of the Parcel is £4/19/6, plus only I/- in the £ for the great convenience of Credit. NO DEPOSIT IS REQUIRED. Parcel will be forwarded FREIGHT FREE. If you are satisfied after examining the contents in your own home, commence paying us 2/6 weekly, or 5/- fortnightly. You are not obliged to keep the parcel, however. If you are not satisfied, return it to us, and any money you may have paid will be refunded in full. Could anything be fairer? Write to us to-day; your Credit is good.

COX BROS.

(AUSTRALIA) LIMITED ELIZABETH STREET, HOBART

“The Firm that Gives Service”

’PHONE 4064 (2 lines)

30/1040 Mercury Press, Hobart