I

'TAt,

Where

Comfort and

Convenience

When furnishing your home concentrate on the kitchen. To the busy housewife this room is of vital importance. Furnish it from the standpoints of comfort and convenience and yours will be the reward of better cooking results and greater leisure hours.

In this booklet we have endeavoured to Doint the way to kitchen furnish-

The Way to *

a Mans Heart ..

Every man appreciates good food.

In fact, much of the happiness of married life depends on carefully prepared meals, well cooked.

ALBION

Stoves

FIRM FAVOURITES FOR NEARLY 50 YEARS

UNITED METAL INDUSTRIES LTD.

DESHON STREET, SOUTH BRISBANE

City Showrooms — Perry House, corner Elizabeth and Albert Streets, Brisbane


Built to Endure \


Every U.M.I. product described in this booklet has had thought and hard work put into it to provide you with an article that will endure during the years to come and give the utmost pleasure and satisfaction

SHADED FINISH

PLAIN FINISH


MOTTLED FINISH


UMITONE FINISH


The Choice of Ten


Colours Besides White


How to Specify Colour

As colour illustrations show, there are ten colours, also white, and four distinctive finishes for JR and Albion Stoves.

All you need do when ordering is to state the colour number and the “finish” required.

e.g., Colour No. 3, Umitone Finish, or Colour No. 7, Shaded Finish.

It’s just as simple as that.

NATURE’S GLOWING COLOURS BLENDED WITH MECHANICAL GENIUS


JR Low Leg Models


pOR fifty years the JR Stove has held a high place in public esteem and comparison will prove that it is still the best.

Built of pure Ingot Iron sheets, thoroughly packed with mineral silicate, the most efficient packing known, JR stoves can be depended upon to give many years of service to their owners. Huge sales bear testimony to their sterling qualities.

Illustrated is a popular plain finish JR model, a stove which is in constant demand.

Plain finish means that the parts are left rough cast. Obtainable also in standard finish, which means that die front edge of the top is polished, while the fire cloor, ventilator and ash pan are nickel plated.

'lade in three Miles, both Ktaiidiinl and plain lin is lie*.

FREE:—Four feet of Piping-, Extension Shelf, Set of Cleaning Tools aiul Flue Brush.

EXTRAS:—Side Copper Boiler, Xickel Plated Front Rail. Plate Rack and Splash Back, Oven Pyrometer and cost of crating if required for safe transit by rail or boat.

SIZES

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Oven

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

2 .

. 30{in.

21{in.

28in.

14|in. 18in.

10in.

l7in.

2

0 21

4 .

. 33fin.

24{in.

28in.

17in. 21in.

lOin.

20in.

2

2 19

5 .

. 33|in.

27in.

28in.

17in. 24in.

lOin.

23in.

3

0 10

JR Elevated Models


pOR cooking convenience the ELEVATED JR Stove above is worth the little extra.

The top is higher and most of the stooping is eliminated when examining oven cooking.

The idea of elevating fuel stoves was originated in the JR Works and met with scant encouragement in the early days, but since then sales have increased to such an extent that practically half the stoves sold to-day are elevated.

This stove is offered in both Standard and Plain finish (see previous page) and has the same JR features which keep it in a class by itself.

Marie In three Nir.es. both Mtunrinrri nml plain finisheM.

FREE:—Four feet of Piping, Extension Shelf, Set of Cleaning Tools and Flue Brush.

EXTRAS:—Side Copper Boiler.

Nickel Plated Front Rail, Plate Rack and Splash Back, Oven Pyrometer and cost of crating if required for safe transit by rail or boat.

SIZES

Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth

Height

Width

Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

2

Elevated

30Jin.

21{in.

35in.

14£in.

18in.

lOin.

17in.

2

1 4

4

Elevated

33|in.

24Jin.

35in.

17in.

21 in.

lOin.

20in.

2

3 8

5

Elevated

33|in.

27in.

35in.

17in.

24in.

l#in.

23in.

3

1 0

Deep Oven JR Stoves


'J’HE Deep Oven JR Stove provides that extra cooking space in one oven, often required by fairly large families.

The oven, being 14 ins. deep, permits a roast as well as a pudding being dealt with at the same time. Being a fairly high stove, it is not usually listed in the Elevated pattern. It can, however, be supplied “elevated” at a slightly higher price. When elevated the height to the top is 39 inches.

This stove, like all JR Stoves, is built throughout of pure Ingot Iron Sheets, which do not flake, and is packed with mineral silicate, ensuring economy in fuel.

>ln«le in three mIxcm, Imtli standard anil plain liiiixlieK.

FREE.—Four feet Piping:, Extension Shelf, set of Cleaning: Tools and Flue Brush.

EXTRAS:—Side Copper Boiler, Nickel-plated Front Rail, Plate Rack and Splash Back. Oven Pyrometer and cost of (‘rating: if necessary for safe transit by rail or boat.

SIZES

Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

2D .

. 30}in.

21}in. 32in.

14£in.

18in.

Min.

I7in.

2

1 19

4D .

. 33}in.

24] in.

32in.

16in.

21in.

Min.

20in.

2

3 8

5D .

. 3 3 J in.

27in.

32in.

16in.

24in.

Min.

23in.

3

0 24

Double Oven JR Stoves


DOUBLE Oven Stove is often required in large house holds, and in offering the model illustrated on this page, we do so with the utmost confidence.

The top oven is used for roasting, etc., while the bottom oven is used for slow cooking or for puddings, etc. It can also be used for heating plates.

An extra feature in all JR Stoves, besides the mineral silicate packing, is the grade of cast iron used on the top casting, which is mainly pure Pig Iron, which ensures the top against flaking. Something worth remembering, and is a feature now with all JR Stoves.

SI at (1in two *. I * <-*•. both xtamlnril mill plain finishes.

FREE.—Four feet Piping:, Extension Shelf, set of Cleaning Tools and Flue Brush.

EXTRAS:—Side Copper Boiler. Nickel-plated Front Rail. Plate Rack and Splash Back and cost of Crating if necessary for safe transit by rail or boat.

SIZES

Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

14 .

. 33Jin.

24{in. 32in.

16in. 21in. lOin.

20in.

4 0 14

15 .

. 33Jin.

27 jin. 32in.

16in. 24itt. lOin.

23in.

4 3 0

JR Nickel Plated De Luxe Stoves

Low Legs


Nos. 21, 41, 51

1_IERE is a stove that is a little more handsome in appear* * ance without costing very much more.

The nickel plating on the oven door, front edge of top, two front legs, firedoor, ventilator and ashpan front, adds to its beauty enormously.

The genuine JR high quality material used in its manufacture ensures lasting service, while its finish ensures lasting pleasure.

For a small extra charge a handsome nickel-plated Copper Side Fountain may be added which provides hot water at all times without taking up top room.

Mailc in three nixes.

FREE:—Four feet black Piping. Extension Shelf set of Cleaning Tools and Flue Brush.

EXTRAS:—X i c k e1 -p1a t ed    Side

Copper Boiler. Nickel-plated Front Rail, Enamelled Piping, Oven Pyrometer, Crating for rail or boat.

SIZES

Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

21

. . 30fin.

21|in.

28in.

145in.

18in. lOin.

17in.

2 0 21

41

. . 33]in.

24}in.

28in.

17in.

21 in. lOin.

20in.

2 2 19

51

. . 33Jin.

27in.

28in.

17in.

24in. lOin.

23in.

3 0 10

JR Nickel Plated De Luxe Stoves

Low Legs with Splash Back and'Plate Rail


Nos. 22, 42, 52

rJ'HIS JR Nickel-plated De Luxe Model, with its white enamel splash back and nickel-plated plate rack, gives increased cooking convenience and pleasure in the possession of such a handsome cooking unit.

Its special quality cast iron top, its pure iron sheet body and double thickness oven, its heavy insulation of mineral silicate ensure for its owner years of cooking satisfaction and added efficiency in low fuel consumption.

Mmle In three sizes.

FREE:—Four feet black Piping:, Extension Shelf, set of Cleaning Tools and Flue Brush.

EXTRAS:—Nickel-plated    Side

Copper Boiler. Nickel-plated Front Rail, Enamelled Piping, Oven Pyrometer, Crating for rail or boat.

SIZES

Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

22 .

. 30J in.

21 Jin. 28in.

14]in. 18in.

10in.

17in.

2

0 21

42 .

. 33Jin.

24jin. 28in.

17in. 21in.

lOin.

20in.

2

2 19

52 .

. 33fin.

27in. 28in.

17in. 24in.

lOin.

23in.

3

0 10


JR Nickel Plated De Luxe Stoves

Elevated


Nos. 23, 43, 53

OEAUTY and convenience are combined in the nickel-plated Elevated Stove shown on this page.

The handsome nickel-plated oven door drops down when opened, and forms a most convenient shelf for basting, etc.

The pot shelf underneath is also a handy place for saucepans or other cooking utensils otherwise in the way.

Being constructed of pure Ingot Iron sheets, this luxurious JR Stove ensures for its owner many years of happy service.

Haile in three Misf.ew.

FREE: — Four feet black Piping. Extension Shelf set of Cleaning Tools and Flue Brush.

EXTRAS:—N ickel -plate cl    Side

Copper Boiler, Nickel-plated Front Rail. Enamelled Piping. Oven Pyrometer, Crating for rail or boat.

SIZES

Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

23 .

. 30] in.

21{in.

35in.

14fin.

18in.

lOin.

17in.

2

1

4

43 .

. 33fin.

24lin. 35in.

17in.

21 in.

lOin.

20in.

2

3

8

53 .

. 33{in.

27in.

35in.

17in.

24in.

lOin.

23in.

3

1

0

JR Nickel Plated De Luxe Stoves

Elevated, with Splash Back and Plate Rail


^yHAT better could you desire in a reasonably priced stove than this nickel-plated Elevated model, with nickel-plated plate rack and enamel splash back.

It is handsome, it is convenient and, above all, it is so constructed that lasting service is assured. Its mineral silicate packing means that your cooking is being done with less fuel, w'hile an even oven heat is maintained, which means satisfactory results every time.

Made in three

FREE:—Four feet black Piping:, Extension Shelf set of Cleaning Tools and Flue Brush.

EXTRAS:—X ick el - plated    Side

Copper Boiler, Xickel-plated Front Rail, Enamelled Piping, Oven Pyrometer, Crating for rail or boat.

SIZES

Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

24 .

. 30jin.

21}in.

35in.

14{in. 18in.

10in.

17in.

2

1

4

44 .

. 33yin.

24jin.

35in.

17in. 21in.

lOin.

20in.

2

3

8

54 .

. 33}in.

27in.

35in.

17in. 24in.

lOin.

23in.

3

1

0

JR De Luxe Stoves

WHITE OR COLOURED ENAMELLED FRONT

Also supplied in “D" Series (deep oven) having ovens 14 inches high instead of 10 inches. See p. 19.

'T'HE combination of the porcelain enamel front and the highly polished nickel-plated oven door makes this stove a particularly handsome and easily cleaned cooking unit. Besides the oven door-—the front edge of the top, the two corner and bottom strips, two front legs, the frames of both the fire door and ventilator are also nickel plated. Further, the front plates of both the fire door and ashpan are enamelled to match the front of the stove. A special quality enamelling iron sheet is used ensuring perfect combination of the enamel to the metal, which means long life and satisfaction.

Can be supplied in a wide range of colours and finishes besides pure white (see page 5).

Mmle in three nisei*.

FREE:—Four feet black Piping, Extension Shelf, set of Cleaning Tools and Flue Brush.

EXTRAS:—X ickel - plated Side Copper Boiler. Nickel-plated Front Rail, Enamelled Piping, Oven

Nos.

25

45

55



Nos. 25, 45, 55


Pyrometer,

boat.

Crating

for

rail or

SIZES

Oven

Width

Depth Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

30fin.

21 jin. 28in.

14$in.

18in.

10in.

I7in.

33}in.

24jin. 28in.

I7in.

21in.

lOin.

20in.

33|in.

27in. 28in.

I7in.

24in.

lOin.

23in.

Weight 2 0 21

2    2    19

3    0    10




JR De Luxe Stoves

WHITE OR COLOURED ENAMELLED FRONT




Also supplied in “D” Series (deep oven) having ovens 14 inches high instead of 10 inches. See p. 19.

THE stove illustrated on this page is similar to that illus-* trated on previous page, except that it has fitted to it a nickel-plated plate rack and porcelain enamelled splash back to match the front of the stove.

Besides making the stove more handsome, it provides a very convenient shelf over the stove for holding plates, etc. The splash back protects the wall behind the stove, and, being porcelain enamelled, it is easily cleaned when

necessary.

Turn to page 5 and see the attractive range of colours and finishes.

Nos.

26

46

56


Width .. 30fin. . .    33|in.

..    3 3 jin.


Made in three xixex.

FREE:—Four feet black Piping, Extension Shelf, set of Cleaning Tools and Flue Brush.

EXTRAS:—N lckel - plated    Side

Copper Boiler. Nickel-plated Front Rail, Enamelled Piping, Oven Pyrometer. Crating for rail or boat.

SIZES

Oven

Depth    Height    Width    Depth    Height

21 Jin.    28in.    14jin.    18in.    lOin.

24jin.    28in.    17in.    21in.    lOin.

27in.    28in.    17in.    24in.    lOin.


Firebox

17in.

20in.

23in.


Weight 2 0 21

2    2    19

3    0    10




JR De Luxe Stoves

Elevated

WHITE OR COLOURED ENAMELLED FRONT


Nos. 27, 47, 57


Also supplied in “D” Series (deep oven) having ovens 14 inches high instead of 10 inches. See p. 10.

IJERE is a stove that has instant appeal to those desiring * * a stove of convenience besides one to enhance the appearance of the kitchen.

Its enamelled front and nickel-plated oven door and facings give immediate impressions of cleanliness and beauty, while the potshelf underneath can he used for accommodating cooking utensils.

This stove has all the basic features in construction which have made JR famous everywhere, yet it brings a touch of luxury into the kitchen. For colours refer to page 5 and make your choice.

>ladc in dim* mIkcm.

FREE.—Four feet Piping, Extension Shelf, set of Cleaning Tools and Flue Brush.

EXTRAS:—N ickel -plated    Side

Copper Boiler, Nickel-plated Front Rail, Enamelled Piping, Oven Pyrometer, Crating for rail or boat.

SIZES

Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

27 .

. 30}in.

21 jin.

35in.

14 2 in. 18in.

lOin.

17in.

2 1

4

47 .

. 33fin.

24 jin.

35in.

I7in. 21in.

lOin.

20in.

2 3

8

57 .

. 33lin.

27in.

35in.

17in. 24in.

lOin.

23in.

3 I

0



JR De Luxe Stoves

With Splash Back and Plate Rail

WHITE OR COLOURED ENAMELLED FRONT


inches. See p.


DESIDES having an elevated oven and pot shelf under-U neath, this stove also has a plate rack with enamel splash back to match the colour of the front.

The cost of this stove, with its many conveniences and beauty measured over the many years of its useful life, works out at a very small sum per year for the happiness and benefits obtained.

Page 5 shows the colours and finishes in which this stove is offered.


Nos.

28

48

58


Width 30jin. 33jin. 33 jin.


in three sixes.

FREE.—Four feet Piping Extension Shelf, set of Cleaning Tools and Flue Brush.

EXTRAS:—Nick el - plated    Side

Copper Boiler, Nickel-plated Front Kail. Enamelled Piping, Oven Pyrometer, Crating for rail or boat.

SIZES

Oven

Depth    Height    Width    Depth    Height

21 jin.    35in.    14 jin.    18in.    lOin.

24 jin.    35in.    I7in.    21 in.    lOin.

27in.    35in.    17in.    24in.    lOin.

Height of Splash Back extra 17 inches.


W’eight

Firebox

I7in.

20in.

23in.

2

1

4

2

3

8

3

1

0



JR De Luxe Stoves

Low Legs

ALL ENAMELLED


Also supplied in “D" Series (deep oven) having: ovens 14 inches high instead of 10 inches. See p. 19.


/"VN this page we illustrate the all enamel finish JR Stove—the first and original enamelled fuel stove produced in Australia. Although like all good things it is constantly imitated, it has never been equalled and still holds pride of place with those desiring only the best.

All enamelled parts are of special quality enamelling iron, ensuring lasting service in use.

As the U.M.I. organisation operates its own Porcelain Enamelling Plant, care can he exercised in the selection of materials best suited for stove manufacturing, besides which any colour and finish can be supplied promptly. (Page 5 gives details.)

Miidr in tliree Nixes.

FREE.—Four feet Piping, Extension Shelf, set of Cleaning: Tools and Flue Brush.

EXTRAS: Nick el-plated Side Copper Boiler, Xickel-plated Front Rail. Enamelled Piping-, Oven Pyrometer. Crating for rail or boat.

SIZES

Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

125 .

. 30jin.

21 Jin.

28in.

14 Jin.

18in.

lOin.

I7in.

2

0 21

145 .

. 33}in.

24Jin.

28in.

I7in.

21in.

lOin.

20in.

2

2 19

155 .

. 33}in.

27in.

28in.

17in.

24in.

lOin.

23in.

3

0 10

Deep Oven Series of JR

De Luxe Stoves



MEASUREMENTS :

Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

125D-126D

30jin.

21 {in.

32in.

14 {in.

18in.

Min.

17in.

2

1

19

145D-146D

33|in.

24 {in.

32in.

16in.

21in.

Min.

20in.

2

3

8

155D-156D

33jin.

27in.

32in.

16in.

24in.

Min.

23in.

3

0

24


WHERE oven cooking capacity a little larger than that of standard models is required, this beautiful stove is found most suitable.

It has an oven fourteen inches high which permits of cooking a large roast and pudding at the one time. It has bright nickel facings—all-enamel front in any colour and finish shown on page five of this booklet—and as such presents an appearance that could not possibly be improved upon.

Model 126D is illustrated—complete with all extras, such as nickel-plated copper water boiler, nickel-plated front rail, oven pyrometer, enamelled ends and enamelled piping—the most complete and most handsome cooking unit you could wish for.

FREE.—Four Feet Black Piping,

Extension Shelf. Set Cleaning Tools and Flue brush.

EXTRAS.—Nickel-plated Side Copper Boiler, Nickel-plated Front Kail Enamelled Ends. Enamelled Piping. Oven Pyrometer, Crating for rail or boat.


The Nos. 125D, 145D and 155D stoves have no splash backs. The Nos. 126D, 14f»D and 156D stoves have splash backs included.

The height of splash back on the 12GD, 146D and 156D series is 17 inches. Also available in elevated models at extra cost —the height to top of stove is then 39 inches.



IjOe Interrupt Our ^Display of Stoves to tell you something of^

KITCHEN PLANNING

By ERIC P. TREWERN, F.R.I.B.A.

THE basic principles in the planning of the modern kitchen for the modern home may be stated as follows :

(a)    Disposition of kitchen with relation to dining room and trade porch in order to contribute to efficient work.

(b)    Completely equipped with useful, clean and sanitary appliances.

(c)    The materials used in the appointments of the kitchen should be such as to permit of easy cleaning, and all surfaces should be clean and washable.

With respect to (a), it is imperative in planning for the new home



to place the kitchen within easy reach of the dining room, in order to reduce unnecessary steps to a minimum. The service door, however, should not open off directly from kitchen to dining room. In order to overcome this disadvantage and to obstruct the diners’ view of the kitchen, also to prevent the odours of cooking from permeating the dining room, a service pantry is frequently included in which cabinets for the accommodation of glassware may be provided. The refrigerator may also be situated here, which is found to be an excellent position when cool beverages are required for the dining table. Trays and cutlery may also with advantage be provided for in the service pantry, where there should be placed a small sink with enamel splash back for the rinsing of glasses or the arranging of flowers for household decoration.

In the planning of the kitchen itself the aim should be to place the essential units in such a way as to conform with step-saving arrangements.




The cooker, whether this be a gas or electric range, should, if possible, be placed in a well ventilated and lighted position, with walls tiled or enamelled.

Adjoining the range on one side should be a combination sink and drain board, with a high splash back. The sink and drain board may be of cast iron enamel, or stainless steel, but should always be in one piece to make for cleanliness.

The sink should be placed under a large window for light and, besides a pleasant outlook offered to a person at the sink, makes the necessary kitchen work much more pleasant.

The hot and cold water taps servicing the sink should be of the Easy Clean type, chromium plated with capstan heads.

No water pipes or service pipes should be visible in the ideal kitchen.

Adjoining the sink the storage presses should be placed, where compartments built like pigeon holes should be placed, suitable for rolling pins, egg beaters and other equipment, while a nest of drawers will take care of cutlery, table linen and such like.

These presses snould be sumcieniiy large to carry shelves for spice, flour, salt and sugar containers, besides the usual assortment of canned foodstuffs.

Portion of the press should have a glass compartment for crockery. Every article that is needed in the kitchen is therefore within easy reach.

A pot cupboard is usually placed close to the range, provided with wire mesh shelving to permit of good ventilation. In the decorative treatment of the kitchen, primrose for the walls, and light ivory enamel for cupboards and mouldings, has found much favour. Other suitable schemes are pale mauve enamel walls and ivory enamel woodwork. Pale green and ivory is also effective.

The hot water supply of the modern kitchen is usually taken from a small central system, with boiler and cylinder in laundry ; recently success has been found in the use of central electric hot water system, which is much preferred to the instantaneous type of hot water unit.

JR De Luxe Stoves

ALL ENAMELLED

Low Legs, with Splash Back and Plate Rail


Nos. 126, 146, 156




Also supplied In "D" Series (deep oven) having ovens 14 inches high instead of 10 inches. See p. 19.

A DELIGHTFUL stove that can be had in any colour is the enamelled front stove illustrated.

The nickel-plated plate rack and the enamel splash back to match the front completes a combination that makes a plain kitchen take on that refinement not otherwise possible. Its convenience is only equalled by its beauty and gives that pride in ownership that every woman desires.

Page 5 features list of colours and finishes.

Miitlc in three sizes.

FREE:—Four feet Piping, Extension Shelf, Cleaning Tools and Flue Brush.

EXTRAS:—Nickel-pi a ted    Side

Copper Boiler. Nickel-plated Front Rail, Enamelled Piping, Oven Pyrometer, Crating for rail or boat.

Nos.

126

146

156


Width ..    30|in.

..    33|in.

..    33|in.


SIZES

Depth    Height    Width

21 jin.    28in.    14jin.

24j in.    28in.    17in.

27in.    28in.    17in.

Height of Splash Back


Oven

Depth    Height    Firebox

18in.    lOin.    17in.

21in.    lOin.    20in.

24in.    lOin.    23in.

extra 17 inches.


Weight 2 0 21

2    2    19

3    0    10


JR De Luxe Stoves

ALL ENAMELLED

Elevated


'J’HE pride of any home is this beautiful Elevated enamelled model JR stove. Could anything be more desired ?

Being elevated, it eliminates stooping, while being obtainable in the most attractive colours and finishes it is immediately admired by all who see it.

Like all JR stoves, this model is made of pure Ingot Iron sheets, while die top and other castings are made of special quality iron to eliminate scaling, etc.

Colours and finishes are shown on page 5.

Mmlo in three sizes.

FREE:—Four feet Black Piping:, Extension Shelf. Set Cleaning- Tools and Flue Brush.

EXT It AS:—N ickel-plated Side Copper Boiler, Nickel-plated Front Rail, Enamelled Piping, Oven Pyrometer. Crating for rail or boat.

SIZES



Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

127 .

. 30]in.

21{in.

35in.

14|in.

18in.

lOin.

17in.

2

1 4

147 .

. 33iin. . 33}in.

24 iin.

35in.

I7in.

21in.

lOin.

20in.

2

3 8

157 .

27in.

35in.

I7in.

24in.

lOin.

23in.

3

1 0

JR De Luxe Stoves

ALL ENAMELLED

Elevated, with Splash Back and Plate Rail


^OTHING is too good for the “Queen of the Home”— and this stove will fill every requirement, both from beauty and cooking standpoints. It is everything a good stove should be.

With the addition of a nickel-plated copper boiler on side, which may be fitted at a slight extra cost, no more complete cooking unit could possibly be desired.

For colours and finishes, see page 5.

Haile in III ret* nIscm.

FREE:—Four feet Black Piping*. Extension Shelf. Set Cleaning Tools and Flue Brush.

EXT BAS:—N ickel -plated    Side

Copper Boiler, Nickel-plated Front Bail, Enamelled Piping. Oven Pyrometer. Crating for rail or boat.

SIZES


Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

128 .

. 30fin.

21 jin.

35in.

14jin.

18in.

lOin.

17in.

2

1

4

148 .

. 33}in.

24 2 in.

35in.

17in.

21in.

lOin.

20in.

2

3

8

158 .

. 33]in.

27in.

35in.

17in.

24in.

lOin.

23in.

3

1

0

Height of Splash Back extra 17 inches.



Albion J unior Stoves


LJERE is illustrated the Albion Junior Stove—a fine little cooking stove built of mild steel sheets, with cast iron top.

For cooking results, this stove is all that could be desired. And this, added to its low fuel consumption, makes it a firm favourite in homes where only a small stove is required.

The illustration shows the stove, complete with plate rack and splash back, as well as side copper fountain. These, however, are not included in the standard model, but can be readily supplied as required at a slightly increased price.

FREE:—Kxtension Shelf and Cleaning Tools.

EXTRAS:—Side Copper Boiler. Plate Rack and Splash Back. Front Rail, Piping and Crating for rail or boat.

SIZES

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Oven

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

0 ..

25 jin.

17 jin. 24jin.

13 Jin.

15in.

8 jin.

14jin.

1 0

17

1 ..

28 jin.

19in.

24Jin.

14jin.

I7in.

8|in.

16 jin.

1 1

19

0 Elevated

25 jin.

17jin.

31 jin.

13 jin.

15in.

8jin.

14jin.

1 1

6

1 Elevated

28 jin.

19in.

31 jin.

14jin.

17in.

8 jin.

16jin.

1 2

3


Albion Junior N.P. De Luxe Stoves


T'HE De Luxe Albion Junior illustrated is built for those 1 desiring a small steel stove of enhanced appearance. The parts nickel-plated are :—Oven door and hinges, front edge of top, firedoor and ash pan door, as well as the top. front legs, which show up in bold relief against the dark background of the rest of the stove.

The housewife would appreciate the fact that the cleaning of this stove is a very simple matter as the bottom slide pulls out similarly to the JR stove, which permits all soot, etc., being easily removed.

FREE:—Extension Shelf and Cleaning' Tools.

EXTRAS:—Side Copper Boiler,

Plate Rack and Splash Back.

Front Rail. Piping and Crating for rail or boat.

SIZES

Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

0 . .

25|in.

17 Jin.

24}in.

13 Jin.

15in. 81 in.

14iin.

1

0

ir

1 . .

28] in.

19in.

24fin.

14jin.

17in. 8j in.

16Jin.

1

1

19

0 Elevated

25]in.

I7jin.

31}in.

13 Jin.

15in. 8|in.

14J in.

1

1

6

1 Elevated

28J in.

19in.

311 in.

14 jin.

17in. 8 Jin.

16Jin.

1

2

3


Albion


Dover Stoves

LOW LEGS


*bhe (fMost cPopular “Dover on the eJYCarket

pOR over fifty years the ALBION DOVER stove has held pride of place with Dover Stove users. The reason is not far to seek. Its design has been kept up to date, its flue arrangements permit easy cleaning, and the correct utilization of heat from the firebox gives the best cooking results.

It can be supplied with either a 14 gauge pure wrought iron sheet oven, or a cast iron oven, at buyer’s option. Its construction ensures satisfactory service as extra weight is put where it is required.

ill two nIxcn.

FUKK:-—Extension Shelf (increases width of stove 7 inches) and Cleaning: Tools.

EXTRAS:—Side Copper Boiler,

Hlate Rack and Enamelled Splash Back. Piping: is als • extra and can    he supplied in    either    black

or galvanised.

MEASUREMENTS

Oven

Nos.    Width    Depth    Height    Width    Depth    Height    Firebox    Weight

7    (Low Legs)    28jin.    19in.    23jin.    Min.    13{in.    8jin.    16in.    1    2    8

8    (Low Legs)    31}in.    21jin.    24in.    Min.    15}in.    8jin.    I7in.    13    8

Albion Dover Stoves

ELEVATED


"THE Elevated Albion Dover is an added cooking con* venience which is much appreciated. The oven, being higher, tiresome stooping is eliminated when oven cooking is being done.

The pot shelf underneath provides a handy place for storing pots and pans. The “drop” fircdoor also is an improvement over the old style swing door, as ashes, etc., do not spill out when the door is opened.

If you require a neat, compact stove, pin your faith in this Elevated Albion Dover.

in

KUKK:—Extension Shelf (increases width of stove 7 inches) and Cleaning Tools.

EXTRAS:—Side Copper Boiler. Plate Hack and Enamelled Splash Back. Piping is also extra and can he supplied in either black or galvanised.

MEASUREMENTS

Oven

Nos.

Width

Depth

Height

Width Depth Height

Firebox

Weight

7 (Elevated)

28J in.

19in.

31fin.

14in.

13 jin. 8} in.

16in.

1 2 16

8 (Elevated)

31 jin.

21Iin.

32in.

16in.

15jin. 8jin.

17in.

1 3 19

Albion '‘Improved" Beacon Light Stoves

Low Legs

0NE of the best known and highly popular stoves during many years past is the Albion Improved Beacon I.ight— here illustrated. As most cooks know-, it is a particularly well made and sturdy cooker, being built entirely of solid cast iron.

With its especially designed shallow firebox, heavy bottom grate and liners, exceptional fuel economy is ensured, w hile its unusual constructional strength means years of satisfactory service.

Made in three sixes—I'I a i n or \ iekel-plated Finish.

FREE:—A Set of Cleaning: Tools.

EXTRAS:—Plate Rack and Enamelled Splash Back. Piping: is extra and none is included with Stove unless specially ordered.

Tf legs not required, height of Stove is reduced by 7 inches. In the Nickel-plated finish, the Oven Door is Nickel-plated.

MEASUREMENTS

Nos.

Width

Depth Height

Width

Oven

Depth

Height

Firebox

Weight

7 . .

31in.

22{in.

23{in.

14 {in.

14f in.

8jin.

16in.

2

010

S . .

33 {in.

27in.

25{in.

17in.

19in.

1 lin.

20±in.

2

2 25

9 . .

35]in.

28 J in.

25{in.

19in.

204m.

1 lin.

22}in.

2

3 24

Albion “Improved” Beacon Light Stoves

ELEVATED

'T’O the many exclusive features found only in the Albion Improved Beacon Light, the advantages of an elevated model have been added. This, you will realise, means that much of the stooping associated with oven cooking is eliminated. The stove itself is so widely known and so widely used that it is unnecessary to dwell upon its virtues.

It is the old favourite brought up to date, but with all its economy, strength and cooking qualities just as good as ever.

Made in three slws.

FREE:—A Set of ('leaning Tools.

EXTRAS:—Plate Rack and Enamelled Splash Ba<*k. Piping is also extra and none is included in Stove unless specially ordered.

MEASUREMENTS

Nos.

Width

Depth

Height

Width

Oven

Depth

Height

Firebox

Weight

7 . .

31in.

22jin.

33in.

14jin.

14jin.

8jin.

16in.

2

0 26

8 ..

33Jin.

27in.

36in.

17in.

19in.

1 lin.

20jin.

2

3 12

9 ..

35} in.

28{in.

36in.

19in.

20jin.

1 lin.

22} in.

3

0 14

Something New!

JR Combination Gas and Fuel Stove

pOR convenience and economy in space, the JR Combination Stove illustrated on this page brings to the housewife something far in advance of anything she has ever seen before.

Just imagine it—all cooking can be done in the one spot—pots, pans, etc., always at hand.

For that heavy dinner, the fuel stove can be used, and if a little extra top cooking is required, the gas burners are available.

For the light tea or breakfast, the gas portion only is used when frying, grilling, toasting and boiling can be performed, using the wood stove top as the table. This combination can be had in all models of JR stoves, so when ordering you need only mention the number of stove required, at the same time giving instructions to convert it into a gas combination similar to illustration.



No. 42 Albion Gas Cooker


Two Large Boiling Burners, One Simmerer Burner and One Revolving Griller Burner.

JN all Albion Koala Cookers you will find the same high-grade packing used (Mineral Silicate), tightly rammed between the walls—not only on the sides of oven, but on the back as well. The oven door is also heavily packed, which is a most desirable feature in gas stoves.

The No. 42, illustrated here, has the front door panel, sides and crown plate porcelain enamelled in white or any colour (shown on page 5), while the top is mottled enamelled.

ICQ UI PM 13 XT INCLUDES:— ICrnuml crown plate, alluminium grill pan and grid or mottle enamel browning shelf and two wire oven shelves.

KXTKAS: Plate Hack and Enamel Splash Back, Enamelled Floor Plate, Oven Pyrometer, Crating for boat or rail.

MEASUREMENTS :—Size of hot plate, 24]in. wide and 19]in. deep, and fitted with non-contact grids.

Size of Oven :—Height, 16Jin.; width, 14in.; depth, 12in. Fitted with two burners.

Total height of stove to top of hot plate :—36 inches.


No. 43 Albion Gas Cooker

Two Large Boiling Burners, One Simnierer Burner and One Revolving Griller Burner.

rJ'HE No. 43 illustrated is built on the same lines as No. 42 (previous page), but has, in addition, the inside of the oven mottled enamelled. The same economy features apply.

EXTRAS :—Plate Rack and Enamel Splash Back, Oven Pyrometer, Enamelled Floor Plate and Crating for Boat or Rail.

Improved Albion Hot Plate

Here is shown the new Albion Koala Hot Plate with its High Efficiency Burners and Non-Contact Grids. This special hot plate ensures that all heat is applied to the vessel, so avoiding waste of gas and high gas bills.

No. 5 Albion Gas Cooker

Three Large Boiling Burners, One Simmerer Burner and One Revolving Griller Burner.

"17 VERY Gas Bill Praises the Albion” is an expression ^ aptly applied. The purchase price is soon forgotten in the savings effected, which convert the first cost into a satisfactory and sound investment.

The front door panel, sides and crown plate are finished in white or coloured porcelain enamel. The top, front frame and legs are mottle enamelled or can be supplied in white or colour to match the rest of the stove at slight extra charge. See page 5 for colour combinations and finishes.

EXTRAS:—Plate Rack and Enamelled Splash Back, Floor Plate.

Oven Pyrometer, Packing: for rail or boat.

FQ i;i PM ENT    1NCLUDES:—En am -

elled crown plate, aluminium grill pan and grid, mottle enamel amelled plate rack and enamelled splash back. All taps fitted to front of stove.

MEASUREMENTS :—Size of hot plate : 24jin. wide x 19}in. deep, and fitted

with non-contact grids.

SIZE OF OVEN :—Height, 16|in.; width, 14in.; depth, 12in.; and fitted with two burners. Total height of stove to top of hot plate, 36in.



No. 40 Albion Gas Cooker

ELEVATED


Three Large Boiling Burners, One Sinnnerer Burner and One Revolving Griller Burner.

rJ"’HE No. 40 elevated model Albion Gas Cooker is an excellent cooking stove with all the renowned Albion features, but re-arranged to allow of its being elevated.

As can be seen, the pot shelf underneath is a convenience, and the oven being high makes for easier inspection during oven cooking.

The oven door panel, sides, crown plate, top crown plate on oven, splash back and pot shelf are enamelled white, or may be obtained in any one of the splendid colours shown on page 5. The burner top is mottled.

EXTRAS:—Enamelled Floor Plate and Oven Pyrometer.

EQUIPMENT INCLUDES:— Enamelled crown plate on top of oven. enamelled crown plate under burners, aluminium grill pan and grid, nickel-plated or enamelled plate rack and enamelled splash back All taps fitted to front of stove.

MEASUREMENTS :—Size of oven: 162m. high, Min. wide, 12in. deep; fitted with two burners, two wire oven shelves and one enamelled browning shelf.

Total width of stove, 3ft. 1 lin.; total height, 45in. Size of hot plate. 27 x 19]ins. Height to top of hot plate, 31] in.


No. 70 Albion Gas Cooker

De Luxe Elevated Model

Three Large Boiling Burners, One Simmerer Burner and One Revolving Griller Burner.

J70R beauty in finish this No. 70 Albion is unexcelled— while for cooking qualities and economy in gas it has no peer.

It is practically all enamelled—the front legs, frame and burner top being mottled, while the oven door panel, sides, two crown plates, splash back and pot shelf are finished in white or any colour in the various finishes shown on page 5.

At a little extra cost the mottled parts can be finished in white or any colour to suit the rest of the stove.

KXTHAS:- Enamelled Floor Plate and Ovt n Pyrometer.

EQUIPMENT INCLUDES: Enamelled crown plate over oven, enamelled crown under burners.

(plate rack and splash back—all to match the colour of the stove) aluminium grill pan and grid. All taps nickel-plated.

MEASUREMENTS :—Size of oven: 16Jin. high, 14in. wide. 12in. deep; fitted with two burners, two wire shelves and one mottle enamelled browning shelf. Total width of stove, 47in.; total height, 45in. Size of hot plate, 27 x 19jins.

Height to top of hot plate, 31} inches.

Albion Hot Plate

'J'HE Albion Hot Plate has proved itself to be wonderfully useful where extra or remote top cooking is required. Tea, coffee and toast, besides a host of other odds and ends can be prepared in large quantities at the one time. The extension shelves as shown provide ample room for plates, jugs, coffee pots, etc. Splash back is standard equipment, as is also pot stand underneath.

This hot plate has become highly popular in tea rooms, cafes, etc., because of its low price and the number of uses to which it can be put.

EXTRA:—Enamelled Floor Plate.

SIZE.—Height. 3U inches: top measures 24J inches x 11*i inches.

The enamelled floor plate, which is extra equipment, can be supplied at a slightly higher price. Cafe proprietors should certainly investigate the Albion Hot Plate.


Albion Picaninny Gas Stove

A Neat Handy Gas Stove for Small Families,

Flats, etc.

THIS is a neat, compact gas cooker, especially built for flats or small kitchens. Although small, it is thoroughly packed with insulating material to provide gas economy and an even oven heat. The Piccaninny has proved itself to be a particularly efficient cooking unit.

As shown, it stands on high legs to prevent stooping when oven cooking, while the oven itself is of ample size for a small family. It is a particularly well made stove and will give excellent service in use.

Made in two fini*l»es.

No. 1 Unpacked—with Bead of Top and Oven Door Polished.

No. 2 Packed—with Bead of Top and Oven Door Polished and Enamelled Inside Door Panel.

MEASUREMENTS:—Top: 21in. wide x 162m. deep. Oven: 12in. high x 12in. wide x llin. deep, and has two burners. Total height of stove, 36fin.

Albion Gas Griller


Albion

Hot

Plate

Gas

Ring


A particularly handy little cooking unit and a favourite with all who use gas cooking as an extra to fuel stove cooking. It is surprising the number of uses which can be found for this gas griller in the kitchen.


This gas ring is something a little ahead of the ordinary type ring. It will accommodate quite a large kettle or saucepan.    A very

handy little article.


Albion Gas Rings

For those requiring a small gas ring—there is nothing better than the Albion illustrated here. A stout little fellow with thousands of friends.


U.M.I. Steel Kitchen Cupboards

Nos. Kl, K2, K3 and K4


No. Kl

The U.M.I. COOL CUPBOARD

^ TRONG steel sheeting is used to build this very desirable cupboard. Thus, it is practically everlasting. It is finished in snow white duco with nickel-plated fittings or in any of the colours shown on page 5, and, being fitted with five wire shelves of ample dimensions, it provides ideal storage for foods, etc.

A special feature of its design is that a constant stream of cool, fresh air passes through from bottom to top—which, besides keeping perishables fresh and palatable, does much to keep the kitchen cool on hot summer days.

Being fitted with “shut-tight" swing door, it is fly proof and mouse proof. And being solid steel it cannot warp.

On the basis of hygiene and kitchen tidiness, you should go into details of this all-steel cool cupboard.

DIMENSIONS :

70in. high, 17jin. deep, 24in. wide. Storage space : 17 cubic feet. Supplied with six feet of ducoed piping free—sufficient to enter the ceiling to carry off all smells of stored foods.

K.2.-The U.M.I. Broom Cupboard




IT is almost impossible to have too much storage room in the kitchen. That is why the K2 cupboard instantly appeals to all interested in modern equipment.

As illustration shows, this cupboard may be used for storage of brooms, brushes, vacuum cleaner, buckets and die many other articles constantly used throughout the home. A place for everything and everything in its place.

Being built of steel throughout, it is damp and vermin proof and will last a lifetime.

Standard finish is pure white auto duco, but when desired it can be supplied in colour (see page 5) to conform to any colour scheme.

The height is 70 indies, depth 17] inches, width 24 inches.

As mentioned on previous page, all U.M.I. steel cupboards are built to a standard size, but should you require one built to your own specifications special quotations will be gladly supplied.

K.3.-The U.M.I. Utility Cupboard


'J'HIS is the ideal companion to the K2, shown on previous page.

It is the strongest and most convenient kitchen safe made.

In this cupboard, as illustrated, there are six adjustable shelves of sufficient size to hold all the groceries required by the biggest household, while ample room is available for bread bin and cooking utensils, such as cake tins, etc.

Three rails and two rows of hooks on the inside of the door are standard equipment and will be found very useful and convenient.

Like all U.M.I. cupboards, it is built of steel for permanence. No warping with a cupboard like this, and no doors that simply won’t stay shut.

It is safe, vermin proof and most attractive looking in white duco finish or in colour (see page 5) to suit any particular colour scheme.

DIMENSIONS :

70 inches high, 17] inches deep, 24 inches wide.

K.4.-The U.M.I. Drawer Cupboard


^ DELIGHTFUL piece of kitchen furniture of steel with two bread bins at bottom, storage compartment above, three silver and cutlery drawers in the centre (baize covered), and a large crockery cupboard at the top.

This cupboard is vermin proof and climate proof, practically no effort being required to keep it clean inside or out.

All fittings are neat and attractive in design and finished in solid nickel plate. Offered to you in white auto duco, or in any colour as per page 5 of this booklet.

DIMENSIONS:—70 inches high. 17J inches deep and 24 inches wide. Special sizes also obtainable at special prices on request.



U.M.I. Cake Cabinet

A VERY handy steel cabinet for storage of cakes, biscuits, pastry, etc. Maintains a delicious freshness. Fitted with two removable shelves and nickel-plated catch. Finished in white duco.

Size—16 inches high, 12 inches wide and 9 inches deep.

Kitchen All Steel Chairs and Tables


Easy to b\eep Qlean;

‘Vermin Vroof *3Beautiful and Everlasting

THE all steel porcelain enamelled top of this table makes perfect cleanliness possible, being easily cleaned with a damp cloth. Grease does not affect it as the smooth hard enamel does not absorb.

For lino protection rubber shoes are fitted.

Although light in weight it is built of everlasting steel.

Height from floor is 31 inches—but tops vary as follows:—42in. x 25in., 42in. x 30in., 48in. x 34in., 54in. x 34in.



KITCHEN CHAIRS

kitchen chairs can compare w ith these U.M.I. chairs built of tubular steel, with sheet steel backs and reinforced steel seats. All joints are welded, not rivetted, leaving no cavity for vermin, etc., to make their homes.

Finished in white duco and mounted on rubber floor shoes. A kitchen chair for all time.


The Albion Gas Copper

pjERE is a gas copper of advanced design that is practically faultless. It has an unbreakable steel top, is of convenient height, and the high efficiency burner can be connected in any position. The cast iron bottom is designed to admit air required in correct proportion. Draughts are prevented, which means that the flame burns steadily under all conditions.

Equipped with the copper boiler and close fitting fid—the top and fid being either plain galvanised or white or mottle porcelain enamelled. Fitted with drain-off cock and fid over copper.

No. I Enterprise Gas Bath Heater



^ PARTICULARLY efficient and low-priced heater of the contact type.

Built of high-grade copper with heavy nickel plating, this heater does much to add to the attractiveness of the bathroom. Water and gas connections are reversible, while interlocking gas and water cocks can be fitted at a slightly extra cost.

EXTRAS—

Bracket or Stand, Piping,

Pilot Light,

Casing for rail or boat.





No. 2 Enterprise Gas Bath Heater

'J’HIS is a very efficient non-contact bath heater, having interlocking gas and water cock, which prevent the gas being turned on before the water—a popular safety device.

It is also fitted with a handy pilot light for easy lighting.

Like all U.M.I. bath heaters, this No. 2 model is built of heavy copper sheeting, is tinned inside and nickelled on the outside. Interchangeable to left or right hand operation.

This is a particularly good heater, giving an abundance of hot water almost instantly.

Extras : See below.

No. 3 Enterprise Bath Heater

'J'HIS heater is similar in design and construction as the No. 2 illustrated above. It is fitted, however, with special shower attachment (as well as plunge bath), providing all the luxury of a hot shower in a few seconds.

EXTRAS: For No. 2 and No. 3 Bath Heaters—

Bracket and Stand,

Piping,

Casing for rail or boat.



c(dhe Improved

Albion Chip Heater

Patent No. 6825

'J'HIS is the most efficient chip heater on the market. It is fitted with a patent flap in the bottom of the heater, which discharges the ashes at will into the ash pan provided. It is constructed on the down draught principal and is made of heavy galvanised iron, being finished in painted aluminium with an enamel top and lid. Knob and spout are nickel-plated.

No stand is required for this heater.


Albion Chip Heater

■yHIS is the original ordinary pattern Albion chip heater, which has been very popular for many years. It is very efficient in operation, and being made of heavy gauge material will give years of satisfactory service. It is fitted with enamel top and lid, cleaning tools and stand. Hundreds of these heaters are in constant use throughout Australia and the continual demand indicates that Albion chip heaters are just as popular as ever they were.

Don’t, under any circumstances, instal a chip heater until you have had full details of the many popular Albion models.

Years of service are built into them and you can rest assured that when you purchase an Albion you will receive nothing but complete satisfaction.


aAlbion Improved

Shower Chip Heater

(Patent applied for)

QWING to the construction of this heater water is heated very rapidly by merely using paper or chips for fuel. A tap is fitted for directing water to either plunge or shower connections.

It is supplied complete as illustrated, with either galvanised or nickel-plated fittings, and has the same praiseworthy cleaning arrangements as the Albion Improved Heater featured on opposite page. It is particularly strongly made and once installed will continue to provide hot plunge baths or hot showers for years.




Roll Top Bath

Qalvanised

THIS is a particularly good quality bath, well made and nicely finished. It is supported at the bottom with a special reinforcement for greater strength. The legs are of cast iron and are so designed and fitted diat the weight of the loaded bath is evenly supported.

Constructed of best quality 24 gauge iron.



U.M.I. Bathroom <S-Medicine Cabinet

with bevelled mirror


AN excellent all-steel cabinet finished in white or in colour as desired. Hinges are hidden, while the door catch is nickel-plated. No. 1—13in. high, I1in.

wide, 5in. deep.

No. 2—I7in. high, 11 jin.

wide, 6in. deep.

Can be supplied as a kitchen cabinet—without mirror.





It is fitted with fire grate, swing door and elbow.


Albion Boiler Stand

CAST IRON

Made in 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20 and 25 gallon capacities

'J'HE Albion is a very old favourite in boiler stands and is still the pick when a strong heavy stand is required.

During the twenty-five years that it has been on the market, over one hundred thousand have been sold. This tremendous demand speaks volumes for its quality and the satisfactory service it provides.

All sizes of spun coppers are also available to fit the various Albion capacities—either in light, medium or heavy gauge copper.


Special sizes can be made for pig and tar boilers


Albion Tripod Boiler Stand

In 10, 12, 14, and 16 Gallon Sizes

^HERE an inexpensive, light, easily carried boiler stand is required, you could do no better than to choose the Albion Tripod. It is strongly built of heavy section mild steel to stand plenty of knocking about, and there is no reason whatever why it should not last a lifetime. This stand has been found very popular where outside work is usually done.




The parts are very easily assembled.


JR

Heavy Cast Iron Boiler Stand

Made in IO and 12 Gallon Sizes

JJERE is an unusually strong stand, being made of best grey cast iron.

Another feature is its convenient height—24 inches only—which eliminates that heavy lifting when washing bed linen, table linen, etc. It is totally enclosed for safety as far as the risk of fire is concerned.

A drop door is fitted as well as a grate which covers the full diameter of the stand. The cast iron elbow for piping is also an advantage.


"Indestructo” Boiler Stand

In IO, 12, 14 and l6 Gallon Sizes

AS the name implies, this boiler stand is unbreakable. Made of heavy 12 gauge steel plate and fitted with best iron grate and elbow, this stand is replete wdth all refinements usually found on the more expensive stands. The Indestructo will give excellent and lasting service and must not be confused with the cheap iron stands offered at lower prices.

The convenient height—26 inches—is also worthy of mention, for the simple reason that much of the hard work associated with the lifting of heavy wet clothes is avoided.

Fuse Fifty-one


Albion Laundry Trolleys


Albion 2 Wheel Laundry T rolley

WHEEL this trolley right up to your boiler or tubs, place clothes in it, and wheel it away to the lines—no back breaking carrying and constant stooping. It is all steel and will last a lifetime. A peg tray is fitted, while a wooden draining rack is supplied for the bottom of the tray. A plug is fitted to end of tray to allow water to be drained off as required.


Albion 4 Wheel Laundry T rolley

SIMILAR in general design to the trolley above, but fitted with 4 wheels instead of 2.

The trays of both trollies are the same size and designed to allow an ordinary clothes basket to be carried in tray. Baskets of dry clothes may be wheeled back to the laundry from the clothes line.

JR Albion Tubs


TpHE best you can buy is the JR * ALBION TUB. being made of selected material in the black, and galvanised after manufacture. In this way the zinc coating i3 heavier, all beads, seams, etc., are fully protected. These factors mean long life.

U.M.I Concrete Tubs

The very best—reinforced and with a single drain off for economical installation. Two compartment tubs also offered —also stands. Get details.

Useful Items for the Garden

"ALBION”

Lawn Rollers


A HANDY little roller, built of steel, which can be filled with water to make it heavier. These water-filled rollers are easier to handle than a solid roller, while the weight can be regulated to suit conditions.

Mnrie lit three siy.es.

No. 1—16in. diameter; 16in. wide;

weight empty, 541bs.; full, 1541bs. No. 2—20in. diameter; 20in. wide;

weight empty, 721bs.; full. 2921bs. No. 3—24in. diameter; 24in. wide; weight empty, U41bs.; full, 4541bs.

If you want a good lawn you must have a good roller. See the roller illustrated or any of the well-known U.M.I. concrete rollers, so popular everywhere.


"ALBION”

GARDEN

SEATS

WHAT could be nicer in that shady corner than one of these garden seats ? They are offered in full layback design— ensuring complete comfort and rest. Legs and frame are of everlasting steel and the seats arc of the very best seasoned hardwood. You may have these seats either varnished or painted as you desire. Made in handy sizes—4ft., 5ft. and 6ft.


Albion

Garden

Barrow

J-JERE is a Barrow worth having for that garden work— light, strong and perfectly balanced.

Its seamless steel tubular frame, strong under carriage and heavy galvanised tray ensure for the owner the lasting service one should expect. The rounded nose permits of easy tipping—the front stays preventing any movement of the tray. Wheel has iron rim and spokes with chilled hub. Axle is very easily replaced in case of wear.


Enterprise

Garden

Barrow

■y H I S is a slightly more expensive Barrow

than the Albion, but is particularly strong and will withstand the heaviest usage. The frame is wrought steel throughout, while the tray and wheel are similar to those used with the Albion barrow.




U.M.I. Hose Reel

^ PARTICULARLY useful article that adds years to the life of your

hose.

Easily wound and unwound and, being made of metal, is unaffected by the weather. Strong steel construction, similar to Albion barrow described above..

Every c3fome J^eeds an Incinerator

Albion

Rubbish Incinerator

ALBION

InQnerator


24iin. high 30£in. high 30Jin. high


'P'HE easy and least annoying way of getting rid of rubbish front the garden is to burn it in one of these efficient incinerators. No open fire to be watched—no soot to be blown about.

This incinerator is designed on the down-draught principle, so that combustion is so complete that every ounce of rubbish is quickly reduced to ashes ready for the garden.

Incinerators are very much sought after to-day, and you’ll get no better value than the Albion.

17in. diameter 20£in. diameter 24&in. diameter


Til It KE


J.R. Cast Iron Rubbish Incinerator

JR incinerator incorporates the same notable features as the Albion, the main difference being that it is made of cast iron. Another feature is that the top is built in two sections, the one containing the cone being removable to allow of quicker feeding of rubbish into the incinerator.

TWO SIZES.

No. 1—211n. diameter; 24in. lilgh.

No. 2—24in. diameter; 30in. high.

Easily moved about and takes ui> little room.


Enterprise Garbage Bins

VERY strong bin, in two standard sizes, which are exclusively used by most of the large councils in Queensland.

Made of heavy 24 gauge galvanised iron, having two handles, 4 x inches, and heavily wired around the top. Fitted with 24 gauge galvanised iron one-piece drawn lid.

STANDARD SIZES

17 x 15 and 22 x 17 inches. One-piece drawn lid can be supplied separately if required.



A

U.M.I. Products

are on view in centrally situated showroom

Perry House

Cnr. ALBERT and ELIZABETH STREETS BRISBANE

At any time you find it convenient, pay a visit to the nicely appointed showrooms, right in the heart of the city.

Here all U.M.I. products are on display, giving you a splendid opportunity to compare quality and value.

You will be made most welcome and will be placed under no obligation whatever to actually make a purchase.

UNITED METAL INDUSTRIES LIMITED)

Works •'Vw Deshon Street, South Brisbane Phone J 1471 (5 lines)

~^ke Garden ..

Us planning and care


AS any gardener will tell you, the actual time spent in the planning and preparation of a garden is time well spent.

Satisfactory growth and best flowerings, with a minimum amount of labour, depend in many cases upon the work done in the initial stages.

The following pages are devoted to garden preparation and maintenance. Space will not allow of elaborate details being given, but it is hoped that the information supplied will be of some help and will contribute a little towards your securing a first class garden in the midst of luxurious lawns. Refer to Pages 53 to 55 for details of useful U.M.I. implements.

Trenching—The First Essential

With most soils, owing to their dose nature, trenching is imperative if first dass results are to be achieved. By this is meant the breaking up of the soil to a depth of from 18 to 24 inches, so letting the air penetrate into it, increasing its fertility and adding to its water storage capacity.

A popular trenching method is first to mark out two strips across the proposed plot, each being about three feet wide. The plot is then divided into three sections and two strips.

Start with trench No. 1—remove its top soil, that is, about ten inches deep, then the bottom soil, keeping both heaps separate. Then remove the top soil of trench No. 2, adding it to the top soil of trench No. 1. Thus No. 1 is empty and No. 2 is half empty.

All you need do then is to throw the bottom soil of trench No. 2 into trench No. 1, covering up this first trench (No. 1) again with the top soil of trench No. 3.

Use the same method with trenches Nos. 2 and 3, and you will keep the rich surface soil in its proper place and the subsoil in correct position.

Leave the soil lumpy as it will aerate much better, and sprinkle freely with slaked lime during the whole process.

Allow to stand for two or three weeks, then spread about three inches of manure on the whole bed and dig well in, breaking up all lumps in the process.

If available, any grass, leaves or garden rubbish may be placed at the bottom of the trench as it will keep the soil open and, when rotted down, will become excellent manure.

DRAINAGE

Drains should be placed a shade deeper than “trench" depth. Levels should also be carefully taken to ensure a "fall” so that the water will be carried away quickly. The usual garden depth is about two feet six inches, although best results are obtained from three to four feet deep.

One inch to three inch pipes are usually large enough, but if not available large stones, broken tiles or ashes are equally suitable-—if these are used it is advisable to cover the drain level with old iron to keep out the fine soil.

MANURING

The best and cheapest manure is stable or cattle manure, providing it is well rotted and free from shavings and noxious weeds. You can use it with almost any soil with excellent results. It is a good habit, however, to secure half an old tank or some other receptacle in which to throw all leaves, grass, ashes, roots, etc. Let it rot and it makes a good manure which costs you nothing, and, besides, introduces to the soil that much-needed commodity—humus. Bone dust and blood manure in moderate quantities may also be included.

Manures, such as potash, nitrogen, ammonia and phosphate of lime, are excellent and most seedsmen carry supplies and can give best advice on their various uses. Liquid manure may be used to advantage to aid flowering, but it must be used weak or well diluted once or twice weekly. See that the ground is damp, otheiwise roots may be injured. Never use liquid manure until buds commence to form or excessive leaf growth is encouraged. Liquid manure is simple to make. First steep the dung in water and add about two ounces    to the gallon    with sheep    or fowl

dung, or half a peck to ten gallons of water    with    cow dung.    Let the    mixture

settle over a few days and it is ready to use.

Half an ounce of sulphate of ammonia in a gallon    of water    is    excellent    for pot

plants once weekly.



ANNUALS AND PERENNIALS

The best way of making a colourful garden is by sowing annuals and perennials. But don't sow them thickly. Give each plant room to develop—to spread its branches. To do this you must “thin out" continually so that each plant stands at least ten inches from another.

Some plants do better if sown in boxes, then transplanted—others do better by growing exactly where they are sown. Any seedsman will guide you, but in every case prepare the ground well by deep spading and adding good manure, and if you give plants room to develop you will soon have a garden of pretty blooms.

ROSES

There are few places in a garden where roses will not do well. Our climate is particularly adapted for rose culture. Roses should not be planted in a too shady place. To sandy soil add a quantity of loam and old manure to stiffen it, as roses like a well-drained heavy soil.

The location of the rose garden should be, if possible, in a good open position which gets the sun during the whole day, but sheltered from heavy westerly winds. May, June, July and August are the best months for planting, but in favourable seasons you can still plant during early September, providing a little extra care is exercised. Early planting will give the best results.

Incorrect planting means poor results. Dig a hole about twelve to fifteen inches in diameter, but large enough to allow all the roots to spread well out. The depth should be about eighteen inches—fill the bottom with a bucket of well-rotted manure, over which place about two inches of soil, and tread down firmly with a slight crown in the centre. Place the bottom of the stem on the crown so that the budded or grafted position of the stem will be about one inch under the final level of the surrounding soil.

Fill in about three inches of soil and spread carefully over the extended roots and tread down firmly, pour a bucket of water into the hole. When this has drained away, fill in the balance of the soil loosely. Planted under this method the new rose plant will not require water for a few days. Always remember that a rose loosely planted will never make a good plant, but be careful not to damage the roots.

Roses should commence to bloom during October and November after planting, but nip off the first few buds to produce strong plants, and if cared for should supply plenty of flowers. During the blooming period liquid manure can be used to advantage.

PRUNING.—There is really no rule regarding the pruning of roses, as each variety has to be considered. With climbing roses a heavy pruning is advised just after the Spring flowering, leaving the youngest and strongest wood only. Cut away weak branches, at the same time shortening all laterals and side shoots to a few buds, and take out any dead wood.

Hybrid Perpetuals of a moderately weak growth should be pruned down to two or three eyes, all weak and crowded shoots taken out. The superfluous woods of strong bushes should also be taken out, pruning the strong shoots down to two feet in length and the smaller ones to about one foot. Don’t leave the shoots too long as this causes the bushes to become weaker each pruning. Prune in midWinter only.

With Tea or Hybrid Tea or any of the ever-blooming varieties, the pruning can be done at any time of the year when plants are out of bloom. By pruning in February and again in July you are assured of fine blooms in Autumn and again in Spring. Cut back to about six or seven inches from the old wood, taking out all weak wood and leaving about five or six shoots. Don't leave too much wood on the plant if you want large roses with long stems.

THE POTTING OF PLANTS

The first essential in potting is to secure a suitable soil and ample drainage. These two factors are important. The richest soil consists of a mixture of well-rotted turfs, cow manure and peat. Silver sand and wood ashes or soot are beneficial. Keep this mixture in a heap and let it thoroughly rot. The longer the better. A good soil should always be of a free and porous nature even when pressed tightly into the pots. Don't use new or fresh manure.

To get ready for potting give pots a good soaking in water. Have some pieces of pot or good drainage material handy. Place piece of broken pot or crockery over the bottom hole, hollow side down. Place pieces of fibre over it, then throw in drainage material and again cover with fibre ; then fill up with potting soil. When plants are potted, see that there is a good passage of air up through the bottom hole. If standing on soil place gravel underneath pot. If on boards, have them narrow. If in saucers, see that no water is allowed to remain, as any water lying about will keep the roots soaked and ruin the plant.

TO RE-POT.—Don't commence to re-pot until you have all your materials handy. Soak the new pots and add your drainage material. Then put in sufficient potting soil to allow you to place the ball of earth containing the plant to its correct height.

Now place your fingers on each side of the plant, turn the pot upside down and strike edge gently on your bench. The ball of soil will leave the pot in one piece. Let the loose drainage material fall away, but do not force as the root fibres may be damaged. Remove the top soil of the ball without touching the root fibres and with both hands press it gently into the new pot, bringing the base of the leaves to within one half inch from the top of the new pot ; then fill up with composite all around the ball and strike base of pot gently on bench to settle plant into position. Place in sheltered position and water gently.

ROCKERIES

You can turn ugly corners to good account and can secure flourishing plants by means ol rockeries. Any good, solid material can be used. Black rocks from the sea beach are very suitable, or pieces of quarry stone.

It is usually unsuitable to raise rockeries on grass. Gravel or concrete foundations arc best. Spring time is the best time to prepare rock work as the soil will have time to settle and the stones will become settled before the frosts of the following Winter.

LAWNS

In the making of a lawn drainage is most important. So, after you have broken jp the land to a depth of eight to ten inches, lay down three inch drainage pipes about two or three feet deep. If soil is poor, add a good dressing of cattle manure.

Before sowing the seed see that the ground is nice and level or evenly sloped. Make it firm and add a dressing of bone dust or wood ashes. Roll with a heavy roller in dry weather. During the Autumn is the best time of the year for laying down a lawn and sowing, and if possible choose a calm and cloudy day. Sow your seed evenly—about one pound to every fifty square yards. Then rake lightly into the soil. Run the heavy roller over it : water regularly and carefully. Mow as soon as growth is high enough to cut. This is important, as is frequent rolling. Mow and roll at least once a week and let cut grass lie where it falls to protect roots from the hot sun.

Pull up weeds as soon as they appear. For lawns which receive hard usage, turf with Buffalo or Blue Couch grass. These cannot be grown from seed—small tufts of the required grass about six inches apart will soon make a good lawn.

Keep your grass fed just as you would flowers. Top dress during the Winter months with rich soil, cattle manure or some other recommended fertiliser.



Monthly Garden Notes

JAM ARY

Sow Anemone and Ranunculus seed for Spring flowering; also Iceland Poppies (in shady positions), Sehizanthus (Poor Man’s Orchid). Primulas. Cinerarias. Pansies. Stocks, Lupins, also our very choice strain of Gerberas. This is also a suitable time to put in some of the most beautiful of the Flowering Bulbs, such as Agapanthus. Belladonna Lily. Cyclamen, Gladioli. Asters will need copious watering as they come into flower. A dusting of lime or tobacco dust or arsenate of lead spray on the plants will check the Aster grub. Dahlias Chrysanthemums and Bouvardias need attention in the way of pinching out laterals, and regular waterings with occasional applications of weak liquid manure. It is a good plan to vary the kind of manure and take care to apply after watering. Roses which have been at rest may be cut back and well watered. They will then bloom in Autumn. First sowings of Sweet Peas may be made this month.

VEGETABLE    < 1 ARDEN.—Ca u 1 i -

flowers should be sown if not already put in; also Cabbage for succession. Beans, Beetroot. Carrots. Leeks. Lettuce. Parsnip. Peas, Radish. Tomato. Turnip can be planted if the weather is favourable.

FEBRUARY

Generally this is the best month to make main sowings of Pansies, Stocks, Lupins. Sweet Peas, Nemesia. Cinerarias, Iceland Poppies. Primula. Malacoides. etc., also the ever popular Gerberas.

During this month the main attention will be given to the watering of the Asters. Dahlias and Chrysanthemums. These latter two should be severely disbudded now if fine flowers are desired and watered with weak liquid manure every week or ten days. Petunias. Phlox. Salvias. Sunflowers. Zinnias and other Summer Flowering Annuals will now be making a great show and should receive the same treatment. and the dead flowers and seed pods picked off. Treat the Roses in the same manner and they will also keep flowering. Roses also that have been resting may be pruned back and well watered to induce a crop of bloom in the Autumn.

VEGETABLE GARDEN.—Last Sowing may be made early in February of French Beans and Wax Beans, while for Swede Turnips this is the main planting month. Beans, Beetroot, Carrots, Cauliflower, Leek. Parsley,

Parsnip, Peas. Shallots and Turnip may be put in if the weather is favourable. Cauliflowers and Cabbages should be transplanted to permanent beds as soon as ready and weather suitable.

M \Bill

Tills is one of the busiest times of the year. As the Aster buds go out of flower, clean the old plants away and dig deeply in preparation for replanting. The following are suitable to follow on:—Cinerarias in shady beds where severe winter frosts are not experienced: Stocks in sunny, well-drained situations; Pansies, Daisies, Dianthus, Margaret Carnations, Nemesias, or almost any of hardy annuals. A main sowing of Sweet Peas should now be sown in a well-prepared bed.

As the Dahlias and Chrysanthemums come into bloom, cease giving liquid manure, but keep them watered and shaded. Now is the best season to plant the beautiful Spring Flowering Bulbs such as Agapanthus Freesia, Gladioli. Ranunculus and Watsonia. The cost of them is so small that every garden should have a collection of these lovely harbingers of Spring. Daffodils and Frcesias make lovely pot plants and are quite easy to grow in this way. Carnation plants should now be ordered; this is the month to plant:    also Roses, Ornamental

Shrubs and Citrus Fruit Trees may be put out towards the end of the month as soon as the plants are in condition for lifting.

VEGETABLE GARDEN.—Main Sowings of the hardier vegetables, including Broad Beans, Onions, Lettuce and Peas may now be made.

APRIL

If the various Flower Seeds recommended to be sown in March have not been planted, they can still be sown, but should be got in before the end of the month, while the ground is still warm. This is a good time to plant out Anemones, Ranunculus, Pansies. Stocks etc., giving them an opportunity to become established before the ground becomes cold.

Early sown Sweet Peas should now be throwing out their tendrils and should be supported in their early stage. A weak spraying of Lime and Sulphur will keep down fungus and other diseases.

Keep a close eye on young Stock Plants for insect pest, particularly the green aphis which appears on the undersides of the leaves. Weak sprayings of Arsenate of Lead or Nicotine will keep these plants clean.

This Is the best month for putting out Roses, Evergreen Shrubs and Ornamental Trees; also such plants as Carnations, Pentstemons, Pelargoniums, Violets and Strawberries should be put in. Plants put in during April take root rapidly and become established before the Winter.

VEGETABLE GARDEN.—In the vegetable garden make another planting of Broad Beans; also Salad Plants and the main sowing of the various Onions. Potato Onions, Tree Onions and Shallots can also be planted now. Dig deeply all vacant, land, adding a good dressing of manure, in preparation for early Spring planting, and always incorporate the Summer mulch with the soil.

MAY

The various seedlings sown in March will be now growing rapidly and should be carefully tended. If too thick, thin out or transplant into boxes. Sturdy plants can only be grown by affording them space, light and air while they are young. As soon as large enough to transplant, they should be put out into their permanent quarters. Pansies. Stocks and Cinerarias should also be planted without delay. May is the best month to plant Roses, though they may be put in any time up to August. Carnation Plants also should now be planted, if not already in. They do much better planted now than in the Spring, and better quality plants can be supplied. This is the month to order Violets and re-make old beds. Planted now, they become established at once. Pelargoniums and Pentstemons may also now be planted, but they will succeed any time till early Spring.

Deciduous Fruit or Ornamental Trees may now be ordered. The earlier they are planted in the Winter the better.

VEGETABLE GARDEN.— Asparagus and Rhubarb may now be planted. Strawberry beds should be planted before the end of the month, if not already in. A sowing of Early Peas may be put in.

fall and receive their Winter dressing of lime sulphur. The most suitable time for these operations depends on the climate, the warmer the climate, the earlier they should be pruned and dressed. Pruning tends to force Roses into fresh growth, and this is not desirable till the heavy frosts are over.

Hardy Annuals and Perennials, as they become large enough for transplanting, should be put out in the borders. Keep the borders weeded and free from snails. This is the month for planting Roses and Deciduous Fruits and Ornamental Trees; also Evergreen Shrubs, and is a good time to dress the garden with bone dust.

JULY

The planting of Roses and Deciduous Fruit Trees should be continued this month if possible. With Evergreen Ornamental Trees and Shrubs and Citrus Trees, however, planting can be continued until August. The pruning of Roses and Fruit Trees, and Winter spraying them with lime sulphur to prevent leaf curl on peaches and other troubles, should be completed this month in all mild climates, say, wdiere oranges thrive. In colder districts. Rose pruning may be delayed till August. This is the month to put in members of the Lily family, choosing a position sheltered from winds; also bulbs of the sweetly-scented Tuberose.

The various Annuals and Perennials in the seed beds should now be transplanted to their permanent beds.

VEt 1 ETA BLE    G A RDEN.—So w i n gs

under a frame in boxes can be made of Tomatoes for early plantings but they will require protection till the frosts are over. Main plantings of Potatoes can now be made; also Jerusalem Artichokes, which are very heavy croppers, and will grow almost anywhere, requiring similar treatment to the Potato, Put In large sowings of Peas, choosing early and late varieties for succession. Transplant Onions. A sowing of these can still be made, choosing an early variety.

JUNE

This is a good month to overhaul the garden generally. Primroses, l’lyanthus and Daisies can be divided and replanted. Dahlia Tubers should be taken out of the ground and stored in a dry place till the late Spring. Another sowing of Early Peas for succession may be put in, choosing a well-drained bed. Now also is a good time to plant Asparagus and Rhubarb. Towards the end of the month and during July, the Fruit Trees and Roses should be pruned as soon as leaves

AI GUST

The kinds of seeds that can be sown in this month depend largely on climate and situation. In some districts. very few frosts are looked for in August, while in others, they extend into September. Such plants as Melons, Early Cucumbers and Tomatoes will not stand the slightest frost, and require considerable warmth in the ground to bring them on. Usually these can be sown towards the end of the month if they are carefully protected from cold winds and are planted in a well-drained warm



situation. Main sowings of all the hardier vegetables may be put in such as Beetroot, Carrot, Celery. Chokos, Leek, Lettuce, Melons, Parsley, Parsnip, Peas, Radish, Rhubarb, Tomatoes.

This is a good time to overhaul the glass house and bush house. Most plants want potting each year, and this is the best month to do it. Lawns can also be top dressed during August or September.

SEPTEMBER

A large number of the more tender annuals for Summer bedding should now be sown in a sheltered seed bed. The large Flowering Petunias is one of the best Summer bedding plants; also the hardy race of Begonia Semperflorens. This and October are the best months to sow Aster Seeds. Given a good water supply in dry weather, few flowers give such good results. From now on to November is the best time to raise all climbers from seed, and for a quick-growing annual variety. Mina Lobata is popular, while for a perennial for a permanent position the Thunbergia Gibsonii (Golden Glory Vine), is eminently suitable. Chrysanthemums may be planted out, but they will succeed any time till November. Tree Begonias may be planted now; they are one of the very best plants for growing under trees if the soil is well enriched and kept well watered. This is a good time to put in Ivy-leafed Pelargoniums (Geraniums). The newer varieties make a really ornamental feature of old fences, etc. September is one of the best months to plant Bouvardias, the other season being February, when the young plants are available.

Now is a good time to plant out Gerberas.

VEGETABLE GARDEN.—In the Vegetable Garden almost everything can be planted this month. For an early crop of delicious Rock Melons, sow such varieties as Rocky Ford and Early Hackensack, while for late use and long-keeping qualities, Honey Dew Melon Is the best. A sowing of Cucumbers should be made this month.

OCTOBER

With the warm weather, main sowings of all the more tender Vegetables. such as Cucumbers. Pumpkins, Melons, etc., may be made; and all varieties of beans except Broad Beans. Chrysanthemums and Dahlias may be planted out. Put a strong stake to each plant as it is put in. Tuberous Begonias and Gloxinias will now be showing signs of growth and may be potted up. Salvias, Petunias and other Summer Flowering Plants should now be sown. In planting out the Large

Flowering Petunias it is advisable to plant rather closer than required, to allow for the pulling out of any odd plants now showing sufficient quality. Choose a sunny position for these; also for Salvias, Portu-lacca, Amaranthus, Celosia, Cockscomb and Zinnias, keeping the partially shaded borders for Asters. Balsams, etc.

This is a great time for weeds. Keep the hoe constantly going; this will conserve the moisture and help the growing plants. If the seed pods are regularly picked from the annuals their flowering period is much lengthened.

NOVEMBER

The rush of Spring bloom will now be over and the Summer flowering plants can be transplanted from the seed beds to the borders. Where seeds have been sown in the borders they will require attention in thinning and watering. As the old flowering plants are removed the vacant ground should be deeply dug and a dressing of well-rotted manure or thoroughly decayed vegetable matter from the compost heap incorporated with the soil. After planting, a mulching of similar material should be scattered on the surface to keep the ground cool during the hot season. Asters should now be put out as soon as large enough, choosing a partially shaded border. and should be sprayed with arsenate of lead to prevent Aster grub in the heart of the plant. For sunny positions, Begonia Semperflorens, Salvias. Petunias, Zinnias Broad-leaved Marigolds, Amaranthus, Celosias and Portulacca will make a grand blaze of colour throughout the Summer; all climbers may also be sown this month. Roses will now have finished their Spring blooming. As the plants ripen their wood, and have had a rest, they may be slightly cut back. We suggest that this be a continuous process throughout December and January, a few plants each month. If they receive a heavy watering after this pruning they will rush into growth again and will bloom throughout the late Summer and Autumn. This does not apply to all Roses, some of which only bloom in the Spring, but is suited for Teas and Hybrid Teas.

VEGETABLE GARDEN.—In the Vegetable Garden a planting of Sweet Potatoes should be put in. The rooted plants are available at this season, also a further planting of Beans (except Broad Beans, for a continuous supply. All Vegetable Gardens should contain a row of Sweet Corn; plant now*, choosing a rich soil. A sowing of Lettuce should be made for Summer Salads.


DUCK Ml I Hit

This Is especially the time for sowing Cauliflower Seed in the Vegetable Garden, and in climates where there are heavy Winter frosts, the seed of Savoy or Curly Cabbage Brussels Sprouts, Borecole or Scotch Kale and Broccoli should be sown for Winter use.

In the Flower Garden, this and January are good months to make an early sowing of Stocks. Iceland Poppies. Schizanthus (the Poor Man's Orchid) and Pansies; care should be taken with the planting of Iceland Poppies as they will not germinate at this time of the year unless planted in a cool shaded 'position. Keep Asters moving and dust with lime or tobacco dust to prevent grub. Dahlias are best planted in December. There is little else to be done in seed sowing or planting, but where a water supply is available the ground should have a soaking every week or ten days. If the surface if well mulched or constantly cultivated this will keep all the plants moving. As the different crops come to maturity, the land should be deeply dug and left in a more or less rough condition to allow the air free entrance. This Summer fallow will bring the soil into good condition for Autumn crops. Roses that are resting mav b.* slightly cut back and seed pods removed, as mentioned before, to bring them into fresh bloom. This is the month to dig Daffodils, Hyacinths and other Spring Flowering Bulbs. Store them in a dry place for re-planting in March. Carnations should now be cut back to within six inches of the ground and mulched. This will induce strong growth and Winter flowers.

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