AUSTRALIAN

TRAVEL

Collins Street, Melbourne.

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL PUBLICITY ASSOCIATION RAILWAY BUILDING, FLINDERS ST., MELBOURNE ENDEAVOUR HOUSE, 33 MACQUARIE PL., SYDNEY OCTOBER, 1952

Booklet


prolonged visit to Australia—to which country so many eyes are now turned. Australia attracts not only the tourist who undertakes the voyage or flight as a pleasant prelude to pleasant explorations, but also those who contemplate the expansion of their business or the investment of their capital (with enjoyment added for good measure). The answers to the questions they most frequently ask are given, as simply as possible, to guide travellers. All costs and prices are quoted in Australian currency.

Australia has not entirely escaped the world's upheavals since 1939. But, in spite of some inevitable recession in amenities and standards, in spite of severe housing and accommodation difficulties, in spite of labour and material shortages that reflect themselves in less adequate services, Australia is still a country of great opportunities, great expectations and a great deal of sunshine and variety of scene—a place of brightness, of plenty and of vigorous health.

One personal detail is underlined. If you are going to Australia for any length of timo or to live there permanently, make quite sure, before you start, that you will be housed; if on a briefer visit, involving movement from place to place, send a note (giving an outline of your plans and the exact date of your arrival—and, as far ahead as possible) to the Government Tourist Bureau at your port of disembarkation. Or, get your travel agent to send it.

FOR AUSTRALIAN TRAVEL SERVICES and BOOKINC PROCEDURE see back page.


>ugh shipping service!


..w... w..w,a    or via the Cape by

P. & O., Orient, Aberdeen & Commonwealth, Blue Funnel, Shaw Savill, Blue Star, Port & Ellerman Lines; from the Mediterranean by Flotta Lauro (Italian Line) and Lloyd Triestino Lines; from Canada by Canadian Australasian Line and the Ellerman-Port-Federal joint Line; from U.S.A. by Matson, American Pioneer and other freighter lines; from India and the Persian Gulf by British-India Line; from Malaya and N.E.I. by Burns Philp and K.P.M. (Dutch) Lines; from the Far East by Eastern and Australian, Australian and Oriental, Burns Philp and Australia and China Lines; and from New Zealand by Union, Huddart Parker, Canadian -Australasian, Matson and Shaw Savill Lines.

Direct air routes are served jointly from England by B.O.A.C. and Q.A.N,T.A.S. Lines; from Canada and U.S.A by British Commonwealth Pacific Airlines; Canadian Pacific Airlines; and Pan-American Airways; from New Guinea and Papua by Q.A.N.T.A.S.; and from New Zealand by T.E.A.L. African services connect with B.O.A.C. at Cairo, and Far Eastern services with Q.A.N.T.A.S. at Singapore. Air Ceylon operates a fortnightly service between Australia and London.

PASSPORTS mND ENTRY

PASSPORTS, visaed where necessary (the shipping line or air-line or travel agent will advise) are essential for both intending residents and temporary visitors. The latter must have sufficient money to maintain themselves in Australia and hold return tickets or tickets for destinations beyond Australia. Ex-enemy aliens and non-British refugees wishing to enter as visitors must first obtain permission from the Department of Immigration in Australia. PERMANENT RESIDENCE

ORDINARILY a British subject of European race needs no permit to enter Australia and settle there, provided he or she has a valid passport, is in sound health and of good character and is unlikely to become a public charge. Non British nationals of European race who wish to settle permanently must be in possession of landing permits or other authority to enter the Commonwealth and should consult the nearest Australian or other British representative who will advise them as to the procedure to adopt. Non-Europeans may be admitted for temporary residence as tourists and for such purposes as education, trade, etc. HEALTH EXAMINATIONS

THESE are made at all Australian ports of entry. Visitors and intending residents from or by way of the East, by sea, are advised to carry vaccination certificates. All visitors and intending settlers who arrive by air MUST carry them.

CUSTOMS

PASSENGERS' bona fide personal effects, including a limited number of cigars and cigarettes, are admitted duty-free, without the usual customs entry. Gifts and anything intended for sale or exchange are dutiable and must be entered in passengers' baggage declarations. Pet dogs and other animals from the East are not admitted to Australia, in any circumstances. Each adult intending settler is entitled to free entry for up to £100 worth of his or her household furniture and effects, provided the furniture has been in his or her use for at least a year. For this purpose, two children count as one adult. ACCOMMODATION

INCLUSIVE charges at leading hotels in the capital cities of Australia are up to 65/- a day; in other good hotels, about 45/- a day. Minimum "room only" tariffs at the best hotels are round about 35/- and 45/- for a double room with private bath. The comparable charges for a room without a private bath are 25/- and 35/-. Private hotel and guest-house tariffs are 17/6 a day upwards. Flats and houses (which are still very difficult to rent) are referred to in the cost of living section of this booklet.

Accommodation charges on tours planned by Government Tourist Bureaux are as high as 71/- per day (room with private bath 40/-; breakfast 6/-; lunch 10/-; dinner 15/-.) This type of accommodation exists in capital cities but not always in country districts.

CURRENCY

CURRENCY denominations are in pounds, shillings and pence. The exchange when this booklet was printed was still £100 sterling to £125 Australian, while $2.21 (American dollars) were equivalent to £1 Australian.

INCOME TAX

AUSTRALIAN tax is levied only on income derived in Australia. Visitors therefore are not taxed, provided they do not gainfully work in the Commonwealth. An indication of the incidence of income tax is given on another page.

FOOD

AUSTRALIA, a major producer and exporter of meat, grain, dairy produce and fruit, has always abundant supplies for internal consumption.

CLOTHES

THERE is little difficulty in buying clothes of any kind in Australia at reasonable prices. A man's or woman's madc-to-order suit, for example, can be bought for from £16 or £17 to about £40, although good cloth is sometimes in short supply, and orders take longer to fulfil.

SCHOOLS

AUSTRALIA has some first-class boarding schools which conform to the British tradition. Inclusive fees at the best known are about £200 I preparatory and junior) to £320 (senior) a year—one or two are a little more expensive There are also, in each State, excellent secondary schools and colleges. A great many of these schools were founded and are governed by the denominational churches. In many of them, special attention is given to children of parents in the East, during both term and holidays.

Primary education is a State function, and is free. There is liberal provision for scholarships and bursaries to the higher State schools, to the secondary schools and to the universities. Children of six to fourteen must attend school.

Junior and senior technical colleges are a feature of Australian education. The universities of each State confer the usual degrees; the standard is high.

SEASONS

DROADLY, Australia's seasons, which reverse those of the northern hemisphere, arc: Spring, September-November; summer, December-February; autumn, March-May; winter, June-August. They vary, to an extent, however, with latitude. The longer summers of New South Wales and Queensland, for instance, shorten the between-seasons of spring and autumn. There are no great extremes of heat and cold, and generally, the air is warm, dry and invigorating.

FREE AND ASSISTED PASSAGES

TTHE Governments of the United Kingdom and of Australia 1 have agreed to two schemes for helping migrants from Britain to Australia. The first gives free passages to exservicemen of the British Isles who served in the recent war and who have made application within the prescribed period. The second gives financial assistance to accepted migrants from the United Kinodom which reduces the sterling fare to £ 10 for tho«e of 19 years and over and £5 for those of 14 to 18; under fourteens are carried free.

There are other migration schemes for approved displaced Europeans, for workers from Malta, Eire and Holland, and for ex-rervicemen from the Empire and Allied countries (other than the United Kingdom) and the Resistance Movements of these countries,

~S/Jort and Relaxation

RACING—Race meetings are held in or near all the capital cities every Saturday and frequently at mid-week. Picnic races are organized in country centres periodically. The Melbourne Cup, Australia's most important race, is run on the first Tuesday in November. The Australian Jockey Club Carnival, which includes the race for the Sydney Cup, is held in Sydney during Easter week, and the Doomben Newmarket (a £ 10,000-race) is run at Brisbane in June or July. On Easter Monday, Australia's richest steeplechase, the "Great Eastern," is run at Oakbank, South Australia. There are trotting and dog-racing tracks in most of the capitals.

GOLF AND TENNIS are played all the year round. Tennis courts and bowling greens are often floodlit for evening games in summer. Cricket is played universally in its season. Football of various codes—Rugby, Association and Australian Rules—is the winter game. Baseball, hockey and lacrosse are also played.

WINTER SPORTS are popular at Mt Kosciusko, Mt Buffalo and Mt Hotham (at all of which there are chalets) in the Australian Alps, and in Tasmania. June, July, August and September comprise the season, although at Mt Kosciusko it begins in May and continues to October and even later.

WATER SPORTS--All the State capitals make full use of their nearby beach and river resorts during the long summers. Sydney alone has 24 ocean beaches, besides its harbour. Surf carnivals, life-saving competitions, yacht races and river regattas arc everywhere held regularly.

FISHING- The trout season is September to April in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania. No leases are necessary for river fishing, which is free. The nominal charges for a season's licence in Victoria, New South Wales and Tasmania are respectively 5/-, 10/- and 30/-. Game fish, including marlin, shark and light game-fish are caught off the coast of New South Wales from December to April, and tunny from September to November. The game-fish season off the Great Barrier Reef, in Queensland waters, is from May to October. Mackerel, queen-fish, turrum, giant pike, kingfish, albacore, bonito, marlin, tunny and sharks are caught. The possibilities of coastal waters generally arc being further explored, particularly off the Great Barrier Reef and off Albany in Western Australia where a 560-pound marlin was landed in a fisherman's net and where large tunny have been caught. Excellent sport has been had with sharks off Port Lincoln, South Australia. The world record shark of 2,225 lb. was caught in South Australian waters.

ROYAL AGRICULTURAL SHOWS—These are held in Sydney at Easter, at Brisbane in August, at Melbourne and Adelaide in September, and at Perth, Hobart and Launceston in October. Besides exhibiting the products of the country these shows usually stage good sporting events, such as jumping, trotting, wood-chopping and so on.

4uitra(ian (Lapitali

CANBERRA: Commonwealth capital and seat of government. Forty years ago, site was a sheep run. First session in Canberra of Australian parliament opened by the late King, then Duke of York, May, 1927. Now one of world's major garden cities. Population about 27,000 including civil servants and United Kingdom and foreign diplomatic and trade representatives. Places of interest: Parliament House, Governor-General's and Prime Minister's residences, Royal Military College, National Library, War Memorial, Institute of Anatomy, Mt Stromlo Observatory, School of Forestry, Cotter Dam, St. John's Church.

BRISBANE: Population exceeds 453,000. First settlement, 1824.    Pleasantly sub-tropical with appropriate trees and

vegetation. Places to see: War Memorial, Public Library, Oxley Monument, Botanic Gardens, City Hall, Cathedrals, Observatory, Queensland Museum and Art Gallery, Parliament House.

SYDNEY: Cradle of Australia, dating from 1788. Population about 1^ millions, spread over nearly 245 square miles. Famous for magnificent harbour and harbour bridge. Other places of interest: Hyde Park and War Memorial, Botanical Gardens, State Parliament House, Mitchell Library, Conservatorium of Music, Anglican and Roman Catholic Cathedrals, National Art Gallery, Australian Museum, Technological Museum, Taronga Park Zoo, Wentworth House.

MELBOURNE: Population about IA millions. Site selected in 1835 by John Batman as "the place for a village." City characterized by dignifed symmetry and parks and gardens. Places to visit: Shrine of Remembrance, Botanical Gardens, Captain Cook's Cottage (brought intact from England), University, Cathedrals, State Parliament House, National Art Gallery, National Museum, Melbourne Cricket Ground (where first Test match was played in 1862), Flem-ington Racecourse.

HOBART: Second oldest city in Australia, dating back to 1804. Population 87,120. Places of interest: Queen's Domain, Government House, Botanical Gardens, St. David's Park, Cathedrals, Museum and Art Gallery.

ADELAIDE: One of Australia's best planned capitals, founded in 1837. City proper .$ divided from suburbs by attractive "green belt" of more than 1.700 acres of park carden and sports grounds. Population 422,000. Places of interest: War Memorial, University, Cathedrals, Botanic Cardens, Torrens Lake. Public Libiarv, Museum and Art Gallery (which houses a notable collection of Australian art), Town Hall, Zoo, Waite Agricultural Research Institute.

PERTH: Dates from 1829, when site selected. Population now 300 000. Like most Australian dies, is characterized by parks' and gardens. King's Park is the most notable. Other places to see: Queen's Gardens, Zoological and Botanical Gardens, University (the first free university in the Empire), Museum and Art Gallery, Cathedrals.

DARWIN: Australia's newest capital (Northern Territory). Site actually dates from 1870. With establishment of Brisbane-Singapore air service. Darwin became northern gateway to Australia, but combined effects of World War I, subsequent economic depression and World War II retarded development. Now, with rapidly increasing importance as Empire airport, it is being replannned as a model tropical city. Population 2,538.

C^oit o f oCivina - -

THE cost of living in Australia cannot arbitrarily be assessed since individual needs and standards vary widely. Broadly, the Australian pound buys as much in Australia as the pound sterling buys in Britain, and varies in its purchasing power between, say, Sydney and Kal-goorlie, as it does between London and Greenock, or as the dollar varies between New York and the Middle West.


The best guide to the cost of living is probably found in the latest awards by the Commonwealth Court of Conciliation and Arbitration of minimum wages. These vary from State to State and industry to industry, but the average for the six capital cities for Adult Males operative as from May, 1952, was £10/16/- per week. This "basic wage" varies with the official index of retail prices and rents and with local considerations: it is not uncommon for a skilled workman to earn £13/10/- a week or more.

For the professional and commercial man, the pastoralist and farmer, and tho_e. aenerally, in the upper income group, the range of income is very wide, although, as in Britain, taxation rises with earnings. Some examples are given under the heading, Income Tax.

FOOD

Overall average Australian prices for basic food needs 'when the latest official figures were computed in April, 1952) were:

(Since the above official figures were computed the prices of butter and cheese have risen.)


Bread . . . . 11 Jd. 2-lb. loaf

Tea........3/11    lb.

Sugar........8d.    lb.

Jam......2/3 11-lb. tin

Potatoes......3/1 -i 7-lb.

Butter......3/1*    lb.


Cheese........2/3    lb.

Eggs........5/6* doz.

Bacon........5/6    lb.

Milk........1/6    qt.

Beef (fresh)    sirloin    3/3 lb.

Mutton    (fresh)    leg    2/1 lb.


RENTS

There is a very wide range of house and flat rentals. Working people in the larger cities might pay 26/- or more a week for a five-roomed wooden house and 35/-or more for a brick one. Professional and business people are paying three, four and five guineas for an emoty house and correspondingly more for a furnished one. . Unfurnished flats of two, three or four rooms vary from about £2 a week to four or five guineas; and from five to ten guineas, or even more may be paid for a furnished flat. A visitor or newcomer who intends to make a long stay in Australia will find some considerable difficulty, while the housing shortage remains acute, in renting either a house or flat, since it is common practice for tenancies to be passed on, with the authority of the owner, from friend to friend.

INCOME TAX

The following notes on Taxation arc intended as a general guide, and necessarily omit the full refinements and qualifications contained in the complete legislation.

Income tax and Social Service Contribution is levied On all income earned in Australia. In addition to the ordinary levy, income from property is subject to a further tax and contribution. A taxpayer who has dividend income from abroad pays only the excess, if any, of the Australian tax over the tax already paid on it in the country of origin. Other classes of income which are already taxed abroad, are free from Commonwealth tax.. The subjoined table of taxation (approximate) on income earned in Australia for the year ending 30th June, 1952, is given as a guide.

Srani port Sc


ervicei -



Income

Tax on Property 1 ncome

Tax on Personal Exertion

Income

Single Man

Single Man

Married Man

Man, Wife and

One Child

1 Man, Wife i and Two ' Children

£

£

£

£

£

£

150

2

2

-—

200

4

4

■—

250

8

8

2

—-

300

13

13

4

1

-

400

25

25

12

6

3

500

45

39

24

15

10

600

68

57

39

27

21

800

121

99

76

60

51

1,000

181

148

122

103

91

1,500

379

310

272

246

229

2,000

621

515

469

435

413

3,000

1,201

1,021

964

921

894

4,000

1,868

1,615

1,550

1,502

1,469

5,000

2,587

2,297

2,225

2,170

2,134

THE main crunk railways of Australia link Cairns, in North Queensland 1 with Perth, the capital of Western Australia (a total distance ol 4,351 miles) and all the capital cities in between. Time-tables (which are subject to alteration without notice, showing main rail connections, are subjoined.

Inter-capital express trains are fast and comfortable. On the main trunk line they are hauled by the most modern diesel locomotives Sleeping-cars with two-berth compartments and all toilet amenities, including water, towels, and soap, are provided for night journeys : restaurant and observation cars are used on most crunk lines, and trains on certain major routes are air-conditioned. On The "Overland" Express between Melbourne and Adelaide modern type sleeping-cars

RJS.

ermces


ale provided. Roomettes (single cabin) and Twinettes (two-berih cabin), each self-contained with hot and cold water and toilets. In addition, shower rooms have hot and cold water.

Special concessions are allowed to passengers from overseas for the free carriage of their luggage to the extent of 334 lb. (first-class) and 224 lb. (second-class).

Tickets are issued for through journeys, but passengers may break their journeys at any capital or country station on the way, provided the journey is completed within the appropriate periods of ticket availability. These periods are a month for single tickets between two States, three months for single tickets between three or more States, and six months for return tickets between two or more States.

TIME-TABLE

(main connecting trains only)

PERTH — ADELAIDE — MELBOURNE — SYDNEY BRISBANE — CAIRNS — PERTH — CAIRNS

Perth

Kalgoorlie

Dep.

4.00 p.m. Tu. Th. Sat.

Arr. 7.45 a.m. W. F. Sun. Port Pirie Junction

Dep.

9.05 a.m. W. F. Sun.

Arr. 11.50 a.m. Th. Sat. M. Adelaide

Dep.

12.30 a.m. Th. Sat. M.

Arr. 3.35 p.m. Th. Sat. M. Melbourne

Dep.

6.40 p.m. Dly. Sun. inch

Arr. 9.30 a.m. Dly. Sun. Inch Sydney

Dep.

6.30 p.m. Dly. Sun. inch

Arr. 9.12 a.m. Dly. Sun. inch

Dep.

7.40 p.m. Mon. to Fri.

Brisbane

Dep.

6.30 p.m. Sat. Sun.

Arr. 3.05 p.m. Tues. to Sat.

Arr. 2.07 p.m. Sun. 1.25 p.m. Mon. Townsville

Dep.

8.00 p.m. Daily exc. Sat.

Arr. 6.10 a.m. Dly. exc. Mon. Cairns

Arr. 4.00 p.m. Dly. exc. Mon.

Dep.

7.00 a.m. Dly. exc. Mon.

CAIRNS —PERTH

Cairns

Townsville

Dep.

10.00 a.m. Dly. Sun. exc

Arr. 7.IOp.rn.Dly.Sun.exe. Brisbane

Dep.

8.00 p.m. Dly. Sat. ext.

Arr. 6.25 a.m. Dly. exc. Mon. Sydney

Arr. 7.36 a.m. Dly. Melbourne

Dep.

11.25 a.m. Dly.

Dep.

8.10 p.m. Dly. Sun. inc

Arr. 11.30 a.m. Dly. Sun. inc. Adelaide

Arr. 9.15 a.m. Dly. Sun. inch Port Pirie Junction

Dep.

7.00 p.m. Dly. Sun. inch

Dep.

1.15 p.m. M. W. Fri.

Arr. 4.15 p.m. M. W. Fri. Kalgoorlie

Dep.

5.00 p.m. M. W. Fri.

Arr. 4.45 p.m. Tu. Th. Sat. Perth

Dep.

7.05 p.m. Tu. Th. Sar.

Arr. 11.30 a.m. W. F. Sun.

RIGHT: Merino Rams Hume Dam

Sydney Harbour Bridge

AUSTRALIA . . .

World’s oldest- continent, land of strange plants and animals.

AUSTRALIA . . .

Continent of opportunity for the tourist and the investor.

MAP OF

AUSTRALIA


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M: lire;


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AUSTRALIA . . .

For escape from the northern winter to a land under the sun.

AUSTRALIA . . .

Most favourable exchange rates for dollars and sterling (£1 stg. = 25/- Aust.).



KaitS.

Melbourne —Canberra —Sydney

Melbourne

Albury

Dep.

6.30 p.m. Dly. Sat. exc.

Arr. 10.20 p.m. Dly. Sat. exc. Canberra

Dep.

10.40 p.m. Dly. Sat. exc.

Arr. 10.45 a.m. Dly. Sun. exc.

Dep.

4.10 p.m. Dly. Sun. exc.

Dep.

4.07 p.m. Sun.

Sydney

Arr. 9.48 p.m. Dly. Sun. exc. Arr. 5.09 a.m. M. W. F. Sat. Sun.

Dep.

8.30 p.m. M. W. F. Sat.

SYDNEY — CANBERRA —

MELBOURNE

Sydney

Dep.

8.00 a.m. Dly. Sat. exc.

Canberra

Dep.

8.58 p.m. Sun. Tu. Th. F.

Arr. 1.52 p.m. Dly. Sun. exc. Arr. 5.15 a.m. Sun. Tu. Th. F. Albury

Dep.

8.30 p.m. M. W. F. Sat.

Arr. 7.20 a.m. Tu. Th. Sat. Sun. Melbourne

Arr. 11.30 a.m. Dly. Sun. ind.

Dep.

7.50 a.m. Dly. Sun. incl.

LAUNCESTON — HOBART

Launceston

Dep.

11.25 a.m. Dly. Sun. exc.

Dep.

5.25 p.m. Dly. Sun. exc.

Hobart

Dep.

3.00 p.m. Sun. only.

Arr. 4.29 p.m. Dly. Sun. exc. Arr. 10.22 p.m. Dly. Sun. exc. Arr. 8.02 p.m. Sun. only.

ervicei


HOBART — LAUNCESTON

Hobart    Dep. 9.20 a.m. Dly. Sun. exc.

Dep. 5.00 p.m. Dly. Sun. exc. Dep. 2.35 p.m. Sun. only.

Launceston

Arr. 2.20 p.m. Dly. Sun. exc.

Arr. 9.SO p m. Dly. Sun. exc.

Arr. 7 32 p.m. Sun. only.

For passengers from Launceston a steamer leaves from Beauty Point to the mainland and a special train and bus service from Hobart connects with the steamer (normally on Friday each week) as follows :—

Hobart ..................... Dep. 9.00 a.m.

Launceston .................. Arr. 1.42 p.m.

Conversely, a bus leaves Beauty Point to connect with a special boat train from Launceston after the steamer's arrival (on Fridays) from the mainland, and reaches Hobart 54 hours later.

LEFT: Australian Alps

Surfing, Pacific Coast Koala

Services

&JS*


FARES, DISTANCES:

Journey

Miles

Single Fares (incl.)

Return Fares (incl.)

1st

2nd

1st

2nd

£

S.

d.

£

S.

d.

£

s.

d

£

,

d.

PERTH to

Adelaide ...

1622

19

17

9

13

13

3

_

_

Melbourne ...

2105

r2S

7

3

16

12

6

_

_

Sydney ...

2695

r3l

3

9

19

18

0

_

_

Brisbane

(via Kyogle)

3308

r37

IS

3

24

15

6

_

_

ADELAIDE to

Melbourne ...

483

r 6

3

6

3

14

9

10

11

0

6

9

8

Sydney ...

1073

rIO

16

6

6

9

9

20

0

0

II

14

6

Brisbane

(via Kyogle)

1686

r 16

8

0

9

18

3

29

15

11

17

5

3

MELBOURNE

to

Sydney ...

590

*7

1

6

*4

II

6

II

17

8

7

5

II

Canberra ...

518

7

2

6

4

12

6

II

2

II

6

14

8

Brisbane

(via Kyogle)

1203

12

3

6

7

13

0

20

16

0

12

0

7

SYDNEY to

Brisbane

(via Kyogle)

613

7

2

0

4

10

0

II

10

4

6

10

0

BRISBANE to

Cairns .

10*3

tio

17

9

ts

17

10


* Via Canberra. 1st £8 5/II. 2nd £5 9 I. t Includes two sleeping berths each 22/- 1st class, and 8/6d. second class. Passengers must book one reserved seat at I fcd. 1st or 2nd class If sleeping berth is not desired.

r Includes Twinette or Roomette Berths available between Adelaide and Melbourne.

Between Launceston and Hobart, the fare is 22/- return. Reserved seats free.

Steamer fares between Melbourne and Launceston are : 1st Single—£4/17/- ; 2nd Single—£3 9 6.


eruice 5


JS

AIR lervices operate between the principal centres of population. The r' most modern aircraft are used. Flights are frequent and fares are reasonable, as the following table, which covers the main airports, shows :—

Flight

Miles

Frequency

each

way

Approx, time of Flight

Single

Fare

Brisbane-Sydney ...

454

10 daily

2J hrs.

£ s. d. 8 16 0

Brisbane-Mel bourne

(direct) ......

858

1 daily

4 hrs.

17 3 0

Brisbane-Darwin ...

1,857

2 weekly

131 hrs.

39 5 0

Sydney-Melbourne (direct or via Canberra)

440

17 daily

2i hrs.

8 7 0

Sydney-Canberra ...

148

8 daily

l| hrs.

3 3 0

-JirS,

Flight

Miles

Frequency

each

way

Approx time of Flight

Single

Fare

Canberra-Melbourne ...

292

4 daily

2* hrs.

7 5 0

Sydney-Ade'aide

(via Mildura) ... ...

704

4 daily

31 hrs.

14 II 0

Sydney-Hobart (direct)

705

2 weekly

3 hrs.

15 17 0

Melbourne-Hobart ...

383

8 daily

21 hrs.

7 12 0

Melbourne-Launceston direct or via King Island)

292

7 daily

2 hrs.

5 15 0

Melbourne-Adelaide ...

404

9 daily

2 hrs.

7 12 0

Adelaide-Darwin ...

1,655

3 weekly

121 hrs.

38 5 0

Adelaide-Perth ... ...

1.419

2 daily

6 hrs.

24 0 0

Perth-Darwin ......

1,969

2 weekly

17* hrs.

42 0 0

eruicei


ouri


l\oad djc

D RISBANE, Sydney. Canberra, Melbourne and Adelaide are linked by *■* regular road services. which operate over scenic routes and use up-to-date vehicles. Launceston and Hobart are connected in the same way. Details :—

Route

Time of Journey

Single

Fare

Sydney-Brisbane via Pacific Highway (coastal) ...

4 days

£ s. d. 13 15 0

Brisbane-Sydney, via New England Highway (inland) ... ...... ......

2 days

7 10 0*

3 days

12 15 0

Brisbane-Melbourne via New England & Hume Highways ... ... ......

6 days

25 2 6

8 days

29 8 0

Brisbane-Melbourne via New England & Princes Highways ... ... ... ...

4 days

14 10 0*

7 days

27 7 6

Sydney-Melbourne via Princes Highway (coastal)

2 days

7 0 0*

4 days

13 10 0

Sydney-Melbourne via Canberra (inland) ...

3 days

115 0

Sydney-Adelaide via Canberra. Murray Valley and Mildura (inland) ... ... ...

7 days

19 5 0

Melbourne-Adelaide via Mt. Gambier (coastal)

4 days

12 7 6

Melbourne-Adelaide via The Grampians (inland)

3 days

9 5 0

Melbourne-Adelaide via Mildura & Murray Valley (inland) ... ... ... ... ...

4 days

II 17 6

Hobart-Burnle via Launceston and Devonport ...

8* hrs.

2 8 6

* Transport only. All fares quoted are subject to alteration at short notice.

NOTE : In addition to these organized road tours there are many scheduled road services between the cities, tourist resorts and country towns.


Fares subject to alteration without notice


FROM BRISBANE Half-day Tours


x.

Mt. Cootha, Brisbane and suburbs (coach)    9

Lone Pine Fauna    Reserve (launch) ...... 3

Pineapple and Redcliffe Peninsula—bayside

resorts (motor    coach) ............ 19

Oasis Tourist Gardens—swimming, fruit farm

(coach) .....................

Redland Bay—tropical fruit farm (motor

coach......................... 18


Full-day Tours by Road

Tambourine Mountain and Palm Grove ...    119

Southport, Surfers' Paradise and Coolangatta

(surfing beaches) ......... ... ...    2 6

Toowoomba—mountains, wheat farming district ........................ 2    15

Six- and Seven-day Tours by Road

Northern Rivers — agricultural, pastoral and

sugar country.................. 18    10

Bundaberg—agricultural, pastoral and sugar 16 15


d.

6

6

6

6

0

6

6

6


0

0


Eight-days' Tour by Rail and Launch

Great Barrier Reef—exploration of coral gardens and marine life on an island...... 25    7

By Air (seven days) ............... 30 14


5

6


Nine or more days' Tour by Air, Rail, Road and Launch

Cairns and Atherton Tableland, taking in Barron Gorge and Falls — jungle, sugar country, crater lakes and the coral gardens

of Green Island.................. 64 19

By Rail....................... 49 15


0

6


Vacation on Tropic Island (Hayman Island—Whitsunday Group)

Accommodation, per week ..    ......... 14 14

Return transport (flying boat) ......... 31 3

„    (rail and launch) ...... 24 2


0

6

2


FROM SYDNEY


Half-day Tour by Road

City and beach resorts............

Full-day Tours (includ. lunch)

Palm Beach, French's Forest (by road)......

Buili Pass, Wollongong and National Park— coastal, bush and river panoramas (by road) Hawkesbury River (by road and launch) . . .

Blue Mountains-Katoomba (by road) ......

Newcastle—steel works (by rail and road) . . .

Two or more days' Tour by Road, or Rail and Road

Blue Mountains and Jenolan Caves ......


8

6

1

8

6

1

15

0

1

15

0

1

17

6

2

8

6

6

0

0


Four or more days' Tour by Road, or Rail and Road

Mt. Kosciusko—trout fishing, November to April; winter sports, June to October, mountaineering at all times.

Fares and tariff on application to N.S.W.

Govt. Tourist Bureau

FROM CANBERRA Half-day Tours by Road

City—Parliament and public buildings ...    90

Government House, Cotter Dam, Pine Plantations ........................ 9    0

Full-day Tours by Road

Mt. Kosciusko (Summer, Sunday. Winter,

Sun. and Thurs.).................. 2    0    0

Clyde Mountain, Bateman's Bay and South

Coast (Tuesdays and Saturdays) ...... 1 10    0

(Road services provide regular tours to most coastal and inland resorts within 150 miles).

FROM MELBOURNE

8

6

12

0

14

0

1

14

6

1

7

6

1

10

0

1

10

0

18

7

6

18

7

6

18

7

6

13

2

0


£ s.

d.

5

6

5

6

11

6

11

6

11

6

10

6

11

6

P

6


Half-day Tours by Road

City and suburbs..................

Dandenong Ranges—fern gullies and bush . . Mt. Macedon (by road) ............

Full-day Tours

Daylesford and Hepburn (by rail and road) . . Marysville, Acheron Way—mountain and forest

country (by road) ..................

Lorne, Great Ocean Road (road, or road and

rail) ........................

Yallourn—State Electricity Commission, Brown Coal Open Cut, Electric Power Development and Briquetting Plant (by road) ......

Seven-day Tours

Australian Alps (by road) ............

Gippsland Lakes and Buchan Caves (by road) Mildura and District—Murray River, irrigated fruit-growing (by road) ............

Eight-day Tour

Mt. Buffalo — mountain scenery and winter sports in season (by rail and road) . . . from

FROM ADELAIDE

Short Tours by Road (1j to 2J hours)

Evening tour to Belair Hill—overlooking whole

of Adelaide.....................

City—parks and gardens...............

Half-day Tours by Road

National Park and Beaches............

Mt. Lofty Summit..................

Torrens Gorge and Millbrook Reservoir . . .

Waterfall Gully and Morialta Falls ......

Razorback and Montacute............

Clarendon and Mount Bold Reservoir . . , ...

LJouri prom the (Lapi tab

continued


Full-day Tours

(including after-

1

7

6

1

5

0

1

3

0

18

0

1

2

6

1

2

6

1

3

6

J

2

6

12

0

8

0

11

0

8

0

6

6

7

0

11

0

7

6

12

6

1

7

6

1

10

0

1

7

6

1

10

0

by

Road

8

15

0

8

15

0

15

0

0

14

15

0

15

0

0

18

0

0

16

17

6

18

17

6


Goolwa and River Murray mouth; in season

(by road and launch) ............

Barossa Valley—vineyards, wineries (rail and

road) ........................

Mannum (by road and launch) .........

Victor Harbour—coastal resort (by road) . . Lobethal and Mount Lofty Summit (by road) . Kuitpo Forest and Port Noarlunga; inspect

winery (by road) ...............

Murray Bridge (by road and launch) ......

South Para Reservoir and Mt. Crawford Pine Forest (by road)    ...............

FROM PERTH

Half-day Tours by Road

Canning Dam and Araluen .....

Swan River Scenic Drive ......

Mundaring Weir and National Park

Metropolitan Beaches.........

City Sights by Night.........

City and Suburban Landmarks . . . Kalamunda and Bickley Valleys . . .

Half-day Tour by Launch

Swan River Scenic Cruise noon tea) .........

Full-day Tours by Road

Yanchep Park and Caves (bus fare only) . . .

Jarrahdale Forest Drive, Serpentine (includ.

lunch) ........................

Pinjarra and Mandurah (including luncheon)

Darling Ranges (including luncheon) ......

Bindoon, Chittering Valley (incl. lunch.) ...

Three-day, Five-day, Six-day and Seven-day Tours by Road

Caves of the South West (three days) ...    ~    ~

Bridgetown and Pemberton Districts (three

days) ........................

South West and Great Southern Districts (five

Busselton and Caves Country of South West

South Western Districts embracing Bridgetown, Pemberton, etc. (big timber forests) (six

days) ........................

Great Southern Districts based on Albany

Pemberton District (seven days) ......

Geraldton and the Midland Districts (seven

FROM HOBART

12-day Tour (Road-Sedan Car)

Cities, Mountains, Lakes, Falls, Caves. Com prehensive scenic tour of Island (including accommodation) ......... ,,,    ...    41 10 Q

Half-day Tour by Road

10 0


Mt. Wellington via Fern Tree Bower to Pinnacle

Full-day Tours by Road

Eaglehawk Neck and Port Arthur—bush and

coast, and ruins of early penal settlement 1 13    0

Russell Falls and National Park—orchards, hop-

fields and bush (by rail or road) £0 13 4 to 115    0

Hastings Caves and Thermal Springs...... 1    17    6

Three-day Tour by Road

Lake St. Clair and West Coast—lake, mountain and forest country............ 6    5    0

FROM LAUNCESTON

12-day Tour (Road-Sedan Car)

Comprehensive Scenic Tour of Island (including accommodation) ............ 38    0    0

Half-day Tours by Road

Corra Linn—Power Station............ 10    0

Mt. Barrow—mountain, river and forest scenery    18 6

Entally National House, Perth and Longford    15 6

Full-day Tours by Road

Mole Creek Caves.................. 1    18    0

Great Lake..................... 1    17    6

Sheffield and Forth Falls............ 310    0

WINTER SUNSHINE TOUR TO CENTRAL AND NORTH AUSTRALIA

A regular road passenger service operates between Alice Springs and Darwin as follows:—

Leave Alice Springs Sunday and Tuesday—arrive Darwin Tuesday and Thursday.

Leave Darwin Thursday and Monday—arrive Alice Springs Saturday and Wednesday.

Fares—including accommodation en route—are £14/10/-each way.

In addition, during the winter months, from May to September, the following organized tours are operated:—

TOUR A: Ten-day camping tour of Central Australia, including visits to Hermannsburq Native Mission Station, Palm Valley and Standley Chasm (Rail £59, Air £63/6/-).

TOUR B: Seventeen-day motor tour from Alice Springs to Darwin, and return, including many places of interest en route (Rail £89, Air £93/6/-).

TOUR C: Twenty-two-day motor tour combining all the features of Tours A and B (Rail £114, Air £118/6/-).

TOUR D: Thirty-three-day Round Australia Tour—Adelaide—Alice Springs—Darwin—Brisbane — Melbourne—Adelaide. By rail, air and road £165. (Tour may, by arrangement, be joined in Sydney or Melbourne).

The duration of tours under "A," "B," “C" and "D" is based on departure from Adelaide and return thereto and the fares are inclusive and cover rail or air travel between Adelaide and Alice Springs.

Sraix'l Service

The transport schedules and other information included have been prepared in collaboration with transportation interests and Government Tourist Bureaux. The rates, etc., quoted are net in Australian currency and were those applying at August 1st, 1952—they are subject to alteration without notice.

Enquiries and arrangements for travel in Australia may be made through Government Tourist Bureaux. Each of the Australian States, and the Australian Capital Territory, has its own Government Tourist Bureau, whose functions are to advise on travel generally in Australia, and particularly within its own territory, also to make bookings by rail, air and road to any part of Australia and to arrange accommodation in hotels, guest and boarding houses. These Bureaux also act in conjunction with one another in passing the traveller from State to State. The addresses of the head offices of the Bureaux are—

Queensland Government Tourist Bureau, Anzac Square, Brisbane, Queensland.

(Telegraphic Code Address—"Queentour" Brisbane.)

New South Wales Government Tourist Bureau, Challis House, Martin Place, Sydney, New South Wales.

(Telegraphic Code Address—"Govtour" Sydney.)

Victorian Government Tourist Bureau, 272 Collins Street, Melbourne, C.1, Victoria.

(Telegraphic Code Address—"Victour" Melbourne.)

Tasmanian Government Tourist Bureau, cnr. Macquarie and Murray Streets, Hobart, Tasmania.

(Telegraphic Code Address—“Tourist" Hobart.)

South Australian Government Tourist Bureau, 18 King William Street, Adelaide, South Australia.

(Telegraphic Code Address—“Govtourist" Adelaide.)

Western Australian Government Tourist Bureau, 772 Hay Street, Perth, Western Australia.

(Telegraphic Code Address—“Westburo" Perth.)

Canberra Tourist Bureau, Civic Centre, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory.

(Telegraphic Code—“Tourist Bureau Canberra.") BOOKING PROCEDURE

Agents planning itineraries on an inclusive basis for their clients, and who are not directly represented in Australia, should make direct contact with the Government Tourist Bureau at the Australian port at which their clients will dirembark.

When inclusive itineraries are prepared, a draft copy should be forwarded to the Bureau at the port of disembarkation so that the details may be checked. The itinerary will be confirmed and costed upon receipt of which information the Agent should forward a deposit of 20% of the listed costs to the Govt. Tourist Bureau concerned. Firm reservations will then be made. The balance of the tour cost must be similarly remitted and received in advance of the tourists, as Tourist Bureaux are unable to extend credit in the matter of tours booked overseas.

Further enquir.es will be welcomed by the Directors of the Australian Government Tourist Bureaux mentioned.

Further information will gladly be given by Australian Government Offices, Shipping and Air Lines and Passenqer Agents, or by

THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL PUBLICITY ASSOCIATION RAILWAY BUILDING. FLINDERS ST., MELBOURNE ENDEAVOR HOUSE S3 M^COUARIE PL., SYDNEY OCTOBER, 1952



A.N.P.A.

This Travel Booklet is published by the Australian National Publicity Association, a non-profit-making organization, controlled by an Honorary Board representing the Australian Railways, Overseas Shipping Lines and Australian business interests.

The aim of the Association is to promote knowledge of Australia in overseas countries, to which end this and other publications are issued.

Address—Railway Building, Flinders Street, Melbourne.

Endeavour House, 33 Macquarie Place, Sydney.

“WALKABOUT”

/    Australian Geographical Magazine

Many thousands of Australians and a rapidly increasing number of subscribers abroad receive accurate, well-illustrated and vividly written information concerning Australia through the monthly geographical magazine, "Walkabout,” published by the Australian National Publicity Association.

Subscription to "Walkabout,” within Australia, Nev. Zealand and annexed Islands, Fiji, the United Kingdom and Ireland is £1/4/- per year (2/- per copy); other Empire Countries, £1/9/- and Foreign Countries. £1/13/- (all Australian currency, Postage Paid). Applications may be made direct to the publishers at Railway Building, Flinders Street, Me! bourne, Victoria, and 33 Macquarie Place, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Printed in Australia by The Specialty Press Limited, /) n    174 Little Collins Street, Melbourne.

J32I fOl&ZS&SS