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HOT-HOUSE AND GREENHOUSE

MANUAL,

Off

BOTANICAL CULTIVATOR;

GIVING FULL

I N ST R UCTIONS

FOR THE

MANAGEMENT AND PROPAGATION

OF THE

PLANTS

Cultivated in the Hot-houses, Greenhouses, Conservatories, Shrubberies, Plantations, and Borders, in the Gardens of Great Britain ; also the Management of Plants in Rooms, &c.

DISPOSED UNDER

THE GENERIC NAMES OF THE PLANTS,

Alphabetically arranged under the Heads of the Departments of Horticulture to which they belong ; with numerous additions and improvements up to the present time.

FIFTH EDITION.

BY ROBERT SWEET, F.L.S.

Author of Hortus Britannicus, Geraniacew, Florist's Guide, British Warblers, British Flower Garden, Cistinecr, Flora Australasicu, Ifc. Ifc.

LONDON:

JAMES RIDGWAY, 1G9, PICCADILLY.

■ ’ ■

<s.

y

TILLING, miNTER, CHELSEA.


PREFACE.

The rapid sale of the former editions of this Work, has induced the Author to a thorough revision of the whole, where he has added numerous new genera, and a number of valuable additions to many of those that were before inserted, with what he considers a much better method of setting out Conservatories, and managing the plants in them, by keeping them within proper bounds, and showing them off to much greater advantage. He has also been very particular in the management of bulbous-rooted and other plants that require a little protection ; those belonging to the Orchideae, and the great tribe more or less related to the Liliaceae and Irideae ; and therefore hopes he has made it much more useful to the general, and also to the amateur cultivator, who will, he believes, find all that is most interesting and useful; and for which trouble and expence he hopes, by the liberal demands of his numerous friends, to whom he owes his most grateful acknowledgments, to be repaid for his arduous task and labours.

CONTENTS.

Page.

On the General Management of Stove Plants...... 1    to 8

Stove Plants .............................. 9    to    198

The General Management of Greenhouse Plants .. 199    /0 203

Conservatory .............................. 203    to    209

Greenhouse Plants.......................... 210    to    423

Hardy Trees and Shrubs ................... 424    to    480

Hardy Herbaceous Plants.................... 481    to    614

Annuals and Biennials ...................... 615    to    704

Management of Plants in Rooms, ............ 705    to    710

Bulbous Roots in Pots, or Water-glasses........ 710    to    712

Cut Flowers, and Specimens Preserved Fresh .... 713    to 714

BOTANICAL CULTIVATOR.

ON

THE GENERAL MANAGEMENT

OF

STOVE PLANTS.

The management of Stove Plants depends a great deal on the kind of house in which they are grown;.but there is little difficulty in growing them well, if the house can be kept up to a proper heat, and a sufficient quantity of air can be given when required. Close glazing is to be preferred; either the lights should be leaded, or the laps stopped with putty; so that a sufficient quantity of air may be always given, and the house kept to a more regular heat. When the laps of the glass are left open, a great deal of air is admitted, • which is often injurious, particularly on a cold windy night. The thermometer should never be allowed to be below 60 degrees of Fahrenheit’s scale in winter; if it gets above 70 on a fine day, a little air may be given, which should be taken

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away early, and the house shut up warm; it then requires less fire to keep up the heat through the night. If the house is heated in the common way by flues, and the plants are plunged in tan, care must be taken not to give them too much bottom heat, as it will injure their roots; or too much water in winter, as it is apt to rot them. Particular caution is necessary for watering in winter not to wet the tan, as it makes the worms very troublesome; they often destroy young plants by throwing the mould out of the pots: but a better way is the one now very generally adopted, which is to do without plunging in tan. Some hot dung or tan may be still kept in the pit to throw up a little Warmth, on which should be put a good thickness of sand or gravel for the pots to stand on, and the plants will thrive much better than when plunged: it is also coming nearer to nature, which should be always studied in the cultivation of plants, both in soil and situation. In tropical countries it is the sun that heats the earth in which the plants grow, not the earth that heats the air; and the heat must be kept up in the stoves accordingly. If the houses are heated by steam, or by the hot water system, that is now becoming pretty general in use, no tan is required. The plants may be set on stages, or any way that is most convenient. Some of them may be planted out in the house, where they will grow in great perfection, and flower and ripen fruit; but if grown in large pots they will answer quite as well; we are no advocates ourselves for turning plants in the ground, as they are very apt to overgrow and spoil each other, which is not the case when grown in pots, as they can then be moved at any time, to give each other room.

To have plants look well, they should be always kept clean and free from insects: if infested with any species of Aphis (generally known by the name of green fly), the house should be smoked with tobacco, which instantly destroys them. The red spiders are likewise a great pest to cultivators, but are also easily destroyed. One'pound of sulphur vivum mixed up in a pail of quick lime, and the flues brushed all over with it as a common whitewash, will destroy any quantity of them, and make the house look light and clean. The mealy bug is also troublesome, if left to increase on the plants; but as soon as they appear they should be brushed off, as well as the scaly insects; for, if left to increase, they will disfigure the plants, and be very difficult to get rid of. In fine weather the plants should be often sprinkled over with water from an engine, and the house shut up warm afterwards, which is a great means of keeping them clean and making them grow luxuriantly. Air should be given in the morning as early as possible, in fine weather, as it sweetens

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the house and makes the plants healthy. It should also be taken away early in the afternoon, and the house shut up warm, that they may not be chilled by the night air.

In potting plants care should be taken to drain the pots well with broken potsherds, or rough bits of turf; for nothing injures them more than letting them get sodden with too much wet. The best time to shift them in fresh pots is the spring, but some will require to be shifted again in autumn, to have them thrive well. The free-growing kinds cannot be well overpotted if there is plenty of room for them in the houses, they will thrive and flower better for being in large pots. Others that are more tender should be kept in as small pots as possible, that they may not get sodden and lose their roots.

For the propagation of plants, a small house should be appropriated: a north-east aspect is preferable to any other, so as to have the morning-sun, and none afterwards; they then want no artificial shading; for, the less sun cuttings have before they are rooted, and the more light, the better. A pit might be made in the house, and one part of it filled with fresh tan, another part with rotten tan, and the third part with mould. In the fresh tan might be plunged, under hand-glasses or bell glasses, any cuttings of plants requiring heat; in the rotten tan, under bell-glasses, any kinds not requiring heat; and in the mould, under hand-glasses, large cuttings of greenhouse plants, See. which require no heat. Cuttings, particularly of woody plants, root best in fine sand, and are safer to pot off after being rooted, as the sand shakes clean from their roots without injuring them. When planted in mould, the roots are apt to break off in parting them ; but some of the herbaceous or soft-wooded kinds will not root well in sand, and must therefore be planted in mould. Cuttings must be put in when the wood is fit. Some kinds root freely in either young or ripened wood; other sorts will only strike in very young wood, and others only in ripened wood. From Christmas to April may be considered as good a time as any to put in most kinds of cuttings; as they root more freely before the weather gets too warm: but some sort or other requires to be put in every week throughout the year. No leaves should be taken off or shortened, except on the part that is buried in the ground; where the closer to the stem they are taken off, the better. The more leaves a cutting has on it, the sooner it will root; though most propagators trim up their cuttings like a parcel of naked sticks, the very reason of their not succeeding. The shallower cuttings are put in the pots the better they root, if they are but well fastened; if planted deep, they are more likely to rot, or damp off: the sand or

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mould in which they are planted must be kept moist, but not too wet, and the glasses must be wiped occasionally; for too much moisture on them will make the cuttings turn mouldy, and rot off, even after they are rooted. When the young plants are rooted, the sooner they are potted off the better, in as small pots as they can be safely got into; for, if left too long in the cutting pots, the sand is apt to injure their roots. When they are first potted they should be kept under a close glass for a few days, or in a frame on a gentle hot-bed, and shaded from the sun with a mat, till they have taken fresh root; then harden them to the air by degrees. When the young plants are drawn up too slender, their tops should be pinched off, which will make them grow bushy. It is always best to top plants when young, if wanted to grow snug: if let run up high, the knife must be used, which causes a wound that sometimes is unsightly. No leaves should be taken off any plants except decayed ones; for it weakens them very much. Taking off’ a large leaf from a young plant will generally kill it; a circumstance that few cultivators are acquainted with.

In procuring loam and peat, or any other mould for potting, the nearer the surface it is got the better; and fresh soil is always preferable to that which has been laid together a considerable time to rot. Where peat cannot be readily procured, decayed leaves or wood, mixed with a considerable quantity of sand, will answer very well for some plants, and light sandy loam for others. The lighter and more sandy the loam is, the less quantity of peat it requires to have mixed with it.

When seeds are received from abroad, some of them should be sown immediately, whatever season it may be; for sometimes seeds will grow when first received, which will not if kept some months longer: but the general time of sowing should be early in spring, that the plants may get strong before winter. A gentle hot-bed is best for bringing up most of the tropical kinds, but some few will come up better on a shelf, or a flue of the hot-house. The sooner seedlings are potted otf the better, as they do not miss their moving when potted off very young; but seedlings are not so hardy, nor so easily preserved, as plants raised from cuttings, and seldom make so good plants: from cuttings they have stronger roots and a greater quantity of them. It is a very erroneous opinion, that is entertained by some people, to think a plant can be only preserved a certain number of years by cuttings; for a plant that is naturally annual may be preserved several years by continually raising it from cuttings, and keeping it from seeding. Cuttings also taken from a plant that has been dead at the root a considerable time, will often strike root sooner, and grow more freely

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than others taken off a healthy plant; and I should never be afraid of losing any plant, after having once got it to thrive, and succeeded in propagating it. Plants raised from cuttings taken from flowering plants, will also flower quite young, which cannot be expected from a seedling.

When plants cannot be easily raised by cuttings or layers, they should be budded or inarched on some species that is the nearest related to them, and this practice will generally succeed.

STOVE PLANTS.

A.

Abroma. This is a hardy stove genus, and easily managed; the species flower freely at various seasons, and will grow in the common garden soil: or a mixture of good loam with a little peat is an excellent compost for them. They propagate freely by seeds and cuttings.

Abkus, or Wild Liquorice, is a pretty climbing plant, and requires a stove that is kept very warm to make it flower well; for which reason it is not so generally cultivated as it would otherwise be. Loam and peat is a proper soil for it; and it may be raised from cuttings planted in sand, and plunged in the tan under a common hand-glass.

Abut a is a genus of climbing plants belonging to Menispermaceae; the species thrive well in a rich light loamy soil; and increase readily by cuttings planted in pots, in the same sort of soil, and placed under hand-glasses in the tan-bed.

Acacia is a beautiful and interesting genus, till lately included in Mimosa, and very generally cultivated. The handsomest stove species are

A. Houstoni, A. grandiflora, and A. speciosa; and several very curious and beautiful new species have been lately imported from the tropical part of New Holland; those also require the stove, but they thrive best in the coolest and most airy part of it; the whole genus is very handsome, and easily managed. Sandy loam and peat soil form a very good mixture for all the species. Cuttings of most kinds will strike root. From the strongest growing kinds, take off large cuttings at a joint, and plunge them in a pot of sand under a handglass in the bark bed. Of the smaller kinds take younger cuttings, and put them under a bell-glass, also plunged in heat. The sooner the plants are potted off after they are rooted, the better. If they stay too long, the sand injures their roots: they should be kept under a close glass, and shaded for a few days after potting off, and exposed to the air by degrees.

Acanthus ilici/olius, or Holly-leaved Bear's-breech, is the only stove species of its genus cultivated in our gardens at present. It is of easy culture, and strikes freely from cuttings. Loamy soil agrees well with it.

Achania, the Malvaviscus of some authors, is a pretty genus, and flowers at all seasons; their showy scarlet flowers make the species desirable for all collections. They will grow in any common garden soil, or a mixture of loam and peat is very suitable for them. Cuttings strike root readily in a pot of sand or sandy mould, plunged in heat under a common hand-glass. The cuttings should be taken off as near the stem of the plant as possible, not being so apt to rot as when cut off in the middle of the shoot. No leaves should be taken off or shortened above the sand.

Ac hr as is a fruit-bearing South American genus, requiring a rich loamy soil. Cuttings strike freely in sand under a hand-glass.

Achyranthes is a genus of easy culture. The handsomest species is A. porrigens; it will thrive in any rich soil. Cuttings root freely in pots of light mould.

Aciotis is a pretty plant belonging to Melasto-maceae, thrives well in sandy peat soil, and about one third of loam mixed with it, continuing to produce its numerous little delicate flowers nearly all the year. Young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass in heat, will soon produce roots.

Acisanthera belongs to the Lythrarieae, but has much the habit of Melastomaceae ; it thrives well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and young cuttings, planted in pots, and placed under hand-glasses in heat, will root readily.

Acrostichum is a cryptogamous genus, belonging to the order Filices or Ferns. Loam and peat is the best mixture for the species. The only way of increasing them is by dividing them at the root, or by seed, which should be sown in a pot nearly filled with peat soil, and must not be covered with mould, but some moss should be placed on the pots, and sometimes watered, so as to keep it regularly moist, for if left exposed to the sun and air it will seldom ever succeed; as soon as the young plants appear, the moss may be taken away by degrees, so as to harden them to the air; all the species of Ferns may be raised by the same method.

Actinopiiyllum belongs to the Araliaceee: its species grow freely in a light rich soil; and cuttings, planted in pots of the same sort of mould, and placed under a hand-glass in heat, will soon strike root.

Adansonia digitata is the largest of all known trees. By some it is called Sour Gourd, or Monkies Bread. Rich loamy soil suits it well, and cuttings root best in a pot of sand plunged in heat under a common hand-glass.

Adelia is best cultivated in rich loamy soil; and the cuttings treated in the same way as recommended for the last genus.

A den a nth eh a, or Bastard Flower-fence, flowers most part of the summer. A mixture of loam and peat suits it very well. Large cuttings with the leaves not shortened, root best in a pot of sand plunged in heat under a handglass.    -

Adiantum, or Maidenhair Fern, grows well in sandy loam mixed with peat: the species are increased by dividing them at the root, or by seed, treated in the same manner as recommended for Acrostichum.

iEoicERAs belongs to the natural order Myrsineae, and is related to Jacquinia: it succeeds well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and ripened cuttings taken off at a joint will strike root, if planted in a pot of sand and placed under a hand-glass on heat.

iEoiPiiiLA is an easy cultivated genus, thriving well in a light loamy soil. Cuttings root very freely under a hand-glass, in heat.

iEcLE Marmelos, or Bengal Quince, likes a rich loamy soil. The wood requires to be ripened before the cuttings are taken off"; then to be planted in a pot of sand without shortening the leaves, and to be plunged under a hand-glass, in heat.

Aekides, or Air-plants, are a parasitical genus of the natural order of Orchideae. They do very well hung up in a basket of moss, occasionally watered, or fixed up in moss to the stump of a tree set up in the stove on purpose: they also thrive well in pots, planted in turfy peat soil, and to be kept regularly moist, but not sodden with too much wet; in the summer they succeed best in a hot-bed frame or pit, but must be shaded from the sun when it shines too strong on them, or their leaves will scorch. They will grow twice as much in a frame, and flower much better than if kept in the house, but they will require to be put in the house in winter, when care must be taken not to overwater them. The greater part of the parasitical Orchideae require the same treatment.

./Erua thrives well in any rich light earth, and is easily increased by cuttings.

ASsciiynomene. This genus requires rather more than common heat to preserve the species through the winter ; being mostly annuals and biennials, so that we seldom see them flower. Rich loamy soil suits them best; and cuttings might be rooted under a hand-glass, in heat.

Agave. Some of the species of this genus require the stove; others do best in the greenhouse : they are easily cultivated ; growing well in sandy loam ; and are propagated by suckers.

Aglaia odorata is a pretty and interesting evergreen plant belonging to Aurantiaceae, or the Orange family; its agreeable scent makes it very desirable, and it is said to be one of the plants used by the Chinese to scent their Teas ; it thrives well in a mixture of two-thirds loam, and the rest peat; and young cuttings that are ripened at the base, taken otf at a joint, will strike root readily, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass in heat.

Ailanthus excelsa grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and may be increased by pieces of the root taken off and planted in pots, with their points above the ground; those placed in a hot-bed frame will soon begin to grow, and will make nice young plants.

Alangium thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, or light sandy loam. Cuttings root in sand plunged under a hand-glass, in heat.

Aleurites triloba is a handsome plant, and thrives well in rich loamy soil: ripe cuttings, with their leaves on, strike root readily in a pot of sand plunged under a hand-glass.

Allajianda cathartica is a fine flowering plant, and thrives well in a rich light soil; cuttings strike freely in a moist heat.

Aloe is a genus of easy culture. Sandy loam mixed with lime rubbish suits the species best, with very little water. They are generally increased by suckers, which some are shy to throw out; when that is the case, by pulling oft' some of the outside leaves and planting them, then

keeping them dry, they will make young plants at the base. Most bulbous plants might be propagated by the same means.

Alpinia is a splendid genus, and easily cultivated. Its species require rich sandy soil, and to be grown in large pots in a moist heat, and they will flower freely. Few cultivators allow them room enough, which is the reason we so seldom see them flower. Several handsome species are now in the collections: they are readily increased by dividing at the root.

Alstrcemeria is a beautiful genus, and delights in a sandy soil. The species thrive and flower well in a mixture of one-third loam, one-third sand, and one-third decayed leaves or light peat. A. Ligtu is generally considered difficult to flower; but it will blossom well by letting the pot be dry for a considerable time till the shoots are all dried up; then fresh pot it, give it a good watering, and put it in a moist heat, and it will flower abundantly. It may be increased by parting the roots, or by seed. Several species of this handsome genus are now in our collections, the greater part of which will survive our winters well in an open border of light sandy soil by the side of a wall, in a southern aspect; they will there grow strong and flower abundantly, and require nothing but a mat to be thrown over them in very wet or severe frosty weather.

Alyxia is a curious genus belonging to the Apo-cyneae; with leaves very similar to Ruscus aculeatus; its species grow freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings, taken off in the ripened wood, and planted in pots of sand under bell-glasses, and then plunged in heat, will soon strike root.

Amaryllis is a beautiful and interesting genus of bulbs, the different species of which are now much cultivated, as they certainly deserve to be, some or other of them producing their splendid flowers all the year through : numerous mules or hybrid productions of this genus have been raised from seeds within these few years, and many of them are very grand ones, far surpassing the originals in beauty, and they also bloom much more freely, which makes them very desirable. In Mr. Colvill’s collection at Chelsea, many hundreds of distinct ones have been raised ; and we have seen 2 or 300 flowering altogether in the midst of winter, when scarcely another flower was to be seen; this was occasioned by turning a great number out of pots in autumn, and shaking all the mould from them ; they were then laid by on a shelf made on purpose, and kept dry, till they began to show flowers, which they did some or other of them in succession all through the winter

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and spring. As soon as the flowers appear, they must be potted and placed in the hothouse : by this means three times the quantity can be grown, than could otherwise be, as they can be grown all the summer in frames, where they will thrive much better than in the house; some of the sorts will not bear turning out, such as A. reticulata and striatifolia, or the mules raised from them; they will flower much better by remaining in pots all the year ; whereas A. regime, crocata, rutila, acuminata, fulgida, John-soni, psittacina, and the mules between those, are much better turned out. A. aulica, ca-lyptrata, and solandrceflora, are also best to remain in pots; but they should be kept dry a considerable time to make them flower. Seeds of this genus, as well as most other bulbs, should be sown as soon as ripe ; when the young plants are a few inches high they should be potted off, either singly in small pots, or several in a larger one; if a hot-bed frame be ready to receive them, all the better, as they will grow much faster in a frame, than in the house ; as soon as the pots are tilled with roots, shift them into larger ones, giving them three or four shifts in the course of the summer; by that means they will grow to a great size, and will sometimes flower when twelve months old. A. reticulata thrives best in light sandy loam; all the other species we find to succeed best in about one half light turfy loam, rather more than one-third of white sand, and the rest turfy peat; the use of the turfy soil is to keep it from binding, or getting hard in the pots, which it will do if sifted fine, as is often done by inexperienced cultivators ; by sifting the mould, it takes away all the best part of it, and that which keeps it open and loose for the roots to run through. Another very material point in the cultivation of this genus, and most others, is to have the pots well drained with potsherds broken small, that the wet may pass off readily; the roots are also very fond of running amongst them. Many people, when potting plants, first place a flat piece of sherd or tile over the hole at the bottom, and then put in the mould; the pot might as well have no hole at all, or they might as well cork it up at once, for the passage soon stops, and it is a chance if the plant does not get sodden and die; and I believe more plants are killed by that means than by any other; the right way is to first lay a piece of hollow potsherd over the hole, and another piece or two against it; after that put in a handful or two, or three, according to the size of the pot, of potsherds broken small, the c 2

smaller in reason the better, with a few rougher ones intermixed, that gives a free circulation, and no plant, a bulb in particular, can be expected to do well without it.

Amerimnum, or Jamaica Ebony, requires a light loamy soil. Cuttings, not deprived of their leaves, strike root freely, plunged under a handglass in a warm situation.

Amomum requires the same treatment as Alpinia. See page 16.

Amyris grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings root freely in a pot of sand under a hand-glass.

Anacardium, or Cashew Nut, requires a light loamy soil. Cuttings from ripened wood, not deprived of their leaves, planted in a pot of sand, and plunged under a hand-glass, will strike root.

Andromeda jamaicemis is treated as a stove shrub, but probably would do better in a greenhouse, and placed out of the house in summer, or turned out in a shady border of bog earth, which no doubt would make it flower. We have seen Vaccinium meridionale (which comes from the same country) flower very well with similar treatment. It requires to be planted in peat mould ; and young cuttings strike best under a bell-glass, in sand.

Anemia is a genus of Ferns, which requires a light loamy soil, and might be increased by dividing at the root, or by seed.

Angelonia salicariafolia is a very handsome flowering stove plant, that succeeds well in any light rich earth, or a mixture of light turfy loam and peat will suit it very well; cuttings root freely, planted in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, but some air should be given it, or they will be liable to rot.

Angraicum is an Orchideous genus, and succeeds well in light turfy peat, with the pots well drained ; it thrives best in a hot-bed frame or pit in summer, and in winter must be removed to the hot-house: it is increased by dividing the roots; the best time for this is the spring or summer, and to be immediately placed in a hot-bed, where it will soon make fresh roots; but care must be taken not to overwater it, as it requires very little at first, until it has made fresh roots.

Angukia belongs to the family of Gourds; it prefers a rich light soil, and is easily propagated by seeds or cuttings.

Ann es lei a is a splendid genus of plants belonging to Mimoseae ; to it belongs Acacia grandi-Jlora and Houstoni of Willdenow, and a few other species; the flowers are of a beautiful

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crimson or fine red, and their leaves are very elegantly pinnated and of a glossy appearance, so that they are amongst the most desirable of Stove plants; thriving well in an equal mixture of turfy loam and peat, with their pots well drained that the wet may pass off readily; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand and placed under hand-glasses in a little bottom heat, will root freely, but they must be potted off as soon as rooted, or they will soon damp off.

Anon a, or Custard Apple, is an interesting genus, several species being cultivated in tropical countries, for the sake of their fruit; and some species have produced fruit under cultivation in this country. They require a rich loamy soil mixed with a little peat, and the cuttings should be ripe before taken off, when they will root in sand, under a hand-glass, in a moist heat. The leaves should not be shortened.

Antidesma requires a rich loamy soil; and cuttings will root in the same way as recommended for the last genus.

Apuelandra is a beautiful genus, belonging to the Acanthaceae. It will thrive well in a mixture of light turfy loam and peat, or any other rich light soil, and cuttings strike root freely in a moist heat, under a hand-glass.

Aralia is a free growing genus ; it thrives best in rich loamy soil: ripened cuttings strike freely under a hand-glass in heat.

Ardisia. Of this genus there are several handsome species, free flowerers and of easy culture: a mixture of loam and peat suits them all very well; and cuttings strike root freely in a pot of sand plunged in a moist heat under a handglass ; they may also be increased by cuttings of the root, planted with their points above the mould, that they may not rot, and then placed in a hot-bed frame, or plunged in the tan-bed of the propagation-house, but they must not be covered with a hand-glass, as that would cause them to rot.

Areca is a fine genus of the Palm, to which belongs the West Indian Cabbage-tree tribe: light sandy loam suits the species best, and they can only be raised from seeds.

Argvreia is a fine genus belonging to the Con-volvulaceae, generally known by the name of Lettsomia in collections, and published under that name in the Flora Indica, though another genus had received that title long before ; most of the species are very strong growing extensive climbers, and require a great deal of room before they produce their flowers; others, as A. cuneifolia, are dwarfer plants, and produce their elegant flowers in abundance; they all succeed

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well in a rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat ; cuttings root freely, placed under a hand-glass in pots of sand or mould.

Aristoeochia, or Birthwort, is a curious genus, the flowers resembling a horn; a mixture of light sandy loam and peat agrees well with it, and cuttings root freely.

Artabotrys odoratissimus is a plant belonging to a genus of the Anonace*; its very fragrant flowers make it desirable for the stove.    Unonet

uncinata, U. hamata, and U. esculent a of Decan -dolle, all belong to this species, according to Mr. Brown; also Annona liexapetala of Hortus Kewensis. A rich sandy loam, and a little peat mixed with it, is the best soil to grow it in; and ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, root readily in sand under a hand-glass in heat.

Arthrostemma is a numerous genus, divided into several distinct sections by M. Decandolle, who observes, it will hereafter require to be subdivided; it belongs to the Melastomaceae, and, like the rest of that order, requires to be grown chiefly in peat soil, with about one-third of sandy loam mixed with it. Young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, or in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, -will strike root readily.

Artoc.arpus, or Bread-fruit; its species are generally supposed to be difficult of cultivation

in this country; but they are now cultivated readily in light loamy soil. We believe they have been generally treated too tende rly and not allowed sufficient air. They adpear to be of the* same nature as the Fig, to which they are nearly allied. Large cuttings root freely in a pot of sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in a moist heat, with all their leaves entire : if the leaves are shortened, it is a great chance if they succeed.

Asclf.pia-s curassavica is a pretty flowering plant of easy culture ; any rich light soil suits it well; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Asplenium, or Spleenwort, is a pretty genus of Ferns. The species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and are increased by dividing them at the root or by seed, as recommended under Acrostichum.

Aspidium is another genus of Ferns, and requires precisely the same treatment as the last.

Astranthus is a Chinese plant, belonging to Homalinese; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass in heat, will soon strike root.

Astrapjea is a grand genus of plants belonging to the Buttneriaceae. A. Wallichii may be considered one of the finest plants that ever was introduced; when loaded with its magnificent flowers, we think nothing can exceed its grandeur; there are other species in the collections about London, but we have not yet seen their flowers; they grow freely in any rich soil, or a mixture of loam and peat suits them very well; young cuttings, planted in mould, and placed under a hand-glass in heat, will soon strike root.

Astrocaryum is a South American genus of Palms; its species thrive best in a rich sandy loam, and delight in a strong heat and moist atmosphere; one of the finest collections of Palms, in this country, is in the large Stove of Messrs. Loddiges, of Hackney, where they are grown in the greatest perfection, and make a magnificent appearance.

Astroniuji belongs to the Terebinthaceae; it grows freely, potted in a mixture of loam and peat, or any rich light soil; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under handglasses in heat, will soon strike root.

Atalantia is a genus belonging to the Auran-tiacece, the Limonia monophylla of Roxburgh; it succeeds well in a mixture of light turfy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass in heat, will strike root readily.

Attalea is a Brazilian genus of Palms, the species of which thrive best in a rich sandy loam, and warm, moist temperature.

Aubletia, or Apeiba, is a fine looking genus, and grows freely in light rich soil. Cuttings must be well ripened; and the glass they are put under should have a little air given it occasionally, or they will damp otf. The best way of flowering it, is to cut a ring round the bark of a large branch, which stagnates it, and throws it into flower.

Averrhoa is a fruit bearing genus, belonging to Oxalidese: the flowers are not showy, but the plants make a good appearance with their large pinnated leaves; they thrive well in light sandy loam, and ripe cuttings root freely in sand under a hand-glass.

Avicennia tomentosa grows best in a mixture ol loam and peat, and ripened cuttings do best under a hand-glass in moist heat, in a pot ot sand.

Ayenia is a genus belonging to Buttneriaccae, of easy culture, requiring rich light soil; cuttings root freely in sand, plunged in a moist heat.

Azima tetracantha, the Monetia barlerioides of L’Heritier, is a stout growing thorny plant, with pretty white flowers; it succeeds well when potted in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings, not too much ripened, will strike root readily, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass in heat.

B.

Bactris is a fine genus of the Palm tribe, requiring sandy loam to thrive in; the species, are only to be increased by seed.

Balsajiodendron, or Balsam-tree, belongs to the Burseraceae; it grows freely in any light sandy soil, or a mixture of sandy loam and peat suits it very well; and ripened cuttings root readily, planted in pots of sand, and placed under hand-glasses in heat.

Bambusa, or Bamboo-cane, thrives well in a loamy soil, and is readily increased by offsets.

Banisteria is a genus of climbing shrubs, some of the species having beautiful foliage, as B. fulgens, See.; they thrive well in sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings from ripened wood strike root freely under a handglass, in a pot of sand.

Bap hi a is a genus belonging to Leguminosae, and is arranged by M. Decandolle in the suborder or tribe Swartzieae; it is a native of Sierra Leone, and therefore requires a warm temperature; a mixture of rich loam and peat is a proper soil for it; and ripened cuttings are not difficult to root, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under hand-glasses in heat.

Bahlehia is a genus belonging to the Acan-thaceae, and nearly allied to Justicia. The species flower freely, and are of easy culture: loam and peat, with a little rotten dung mixed with it, is the best soil for them. Cuttings root freely; they strike best from the young wood, under a hand-glass, in the same kind of soil as the plants grow in.

Barkingtonia speciosa is one of the finest plants in nature; it is very scarce, and is rather difficult to manage. In its native country it grows near water, so that it requires to be kept moist and warm; if the temperature of the house should by chance get below 60 degrees of Fahrenheit, the plants are sure to show it, as it injures them considerably. A mixture of two thirds loam and one third peat is a good soil for it. Cuttings taken off at a joint, when the wood is ripe, and planted in a pot of sand, under a hand-glass, in moist heat, will strike root readily: none of the leaves should be taken off or shortened.

Bassia thrives well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat. Ripened cuttings strike best under a hand-glass, in sand.

Bauhinia is a curious and interesting genus, easily recognized by its bilobed leaves; it was named, by Linnaeus, after the celebrated brothers, John and Caspar Bauhin. The species are mostly climbing plants, and some of them are very splendid; they thrive well in a light loamy soil, or two thirds loam and one third peat. Cuttings should be taken off when the plants are in a growing state, not very old or very young; the small kinds do best under a bell-glass, the large kinds under a hand-glass, in sand, and in a moist heat. The leaves should not be shortened.

Begonia is a somewhat succulent genus, and the leaves are oblique at their base; there are now a great many species of them cultivated in the different collections of this country, and several of them are very handsome. A rich light soil suits them best; and cuttings strike root freely under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil.

Berrya is an East Indian genus belonging to the Tiliaceas; it succeeds well in a mixture of rich loam and peat, and cuttings strike readily, planted in pots of mould or sand, and placed under a hand-glass in heat.

Besleria is a pretty genus of easy culture; a rich light soil suits it best. Cuttings strike freely by sticking them in the tan-bed without any other protection.

Beurreria is a West Indian genus belonging to

Boraginese; its species thrive well in an equal mixture of rich loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass in heat, will soon strike root.

Big non i a, or Trumpet-flower, is a splendid genus ; several of the species are climbers, and very desirable plants for the stove, as they grow freely, and flower well. A mixture of rich light loam and peat suits them best. Cuttings strike very readily from the young shoots, put under a hand-glass, in heat, either in mould or sand.

Bixa Orellana, or Anotta, grows to a large plant before it flowers, unless cuttings be taken from a flowering plant and struck; then the plants will flower quite young. Loam and peat suits it well, and cuttings root freely, under a handglass, in sand.

Blackavellia belongs to the Homalineae; its species thrive well in a light sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings might be easily rooted by planting them in pots of sand, and placing them on heat, under a hand-glass.

Blake a is a beautiful genus, belonging to the Melastomaceae. It flowers very freely, and thrives well in peat-mould, or a mixture of peat and loam, and requires a good deal of water. Cuttings should be taken from shoots quite ripe, or they are apt to rot; planted in sand or peat, and plunged in a moist heat, under a glass, they will root freely. .

Blechum isagenus belonging to the Acanthaceae. It grows freely in a rich light soil; and cuttings soon strike root under a hand-glass in heat.

Bletia is a fine genus of the Orchideae, of easy culture; the best soil for it is sandy loam, mixed with peat. It is readily propagated by dividing its roots.

Bligiiia sapida, or Akee-tree, is an African fruit-tree, much esteemed for its fruit; it grows well in a mixture of loam and peat. Ripened cuttings, with all their leaves on, root best in sand, under a hand-glass.

Bocconia, or Tree Celandine, is a plant of fine foliage, but insignificant bloom. It grows well in a rich light soil, and ripens seeds plentifully.

Bcehmeria belongs to the Urticese; some of the species bear fine large foliage, but their flowers are very insignificant. The Stove species thrive well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of mould, and placed under hand-glasses in heat, will soon strike root.

Boerhaavia, or Hogweed, grows well in rich loamy soil, and cuttings root freely taken from young shoots, and planted in the same sort of soil.

Bombax, or Silk Cotton-tree, grows freely in a loamy soil; the cuttings should not be too ripe, but taken off at a joint; they will root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Boxtia is a genus belonging to the Myoporinae ; it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass, in heat.

Borassus is a genus of the Palm tribe, which thrives best in sandy loam, and is propagated by seed.

Bo sc i a belongs to the Capparideae, and thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily inpots of sand, placed under a hand-glass in heat.

Boswei.lia belongs to the Burseraceae; its species are natives of the East Indies, and produce a sort of balsam ; they thrive well in any rich loamy soil; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed in heat under a handglass, will root without difficulty.

Bourreria is a genus of easy culture ; a mixture of loam and peat suits it well; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Bouvardia versicolor may be considered as a stove plant, as it does not thrive in a greenhouse in winter ; it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike readily, taken

p

off in the young wood and planted in pots of mould, and placed under a hand-glass.

Brachystelma is a curious genus belonging to Asclepiadeae; its flowers resemble those of a Stapelia very much; and as it produces a large tuberous root, it requires no water all the winter, when in a dormant state; it grows freely in a mixture of light sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of mould in spring, and placed under a handglass, will root, and form tubers by autumn, so that the plants may be preserved, but if planted later in summer, they will not have sufficient time to make tubers, the only method by which they can be kept.

Brassavola belongs to the Orchidese, and requires the same treatment as iErides, or Air-plants, to which it is nearly related. It succeeds best, planted in a pot of peat soil, and to be grown in a hot-bed frame or pit in summer, in the same manner as ASrides; and may be propagated, but very sparingly, by dividing at the root.

Brassia is also a genus of the Orchideae, and one of the handsomest of the natural order; its species require to be potted in light sandy peat; and as they grow freely, to be shifted into larger pots; not to be parted too often, as that stops their flowering; the hot-bed frame is the best situation for them in summer; and care must be taken not to water them over the leaves, or there will be a chance of their rotting; the only method of propagation is by parting them at the root.

Brexia, or Venana of Lamarck, is a fine genus of plants, much esteemed for its beautiful foliage, some species of which had passed in our collections for some time, as species of Theophrasta; two have already flowered, one of which, the Brexia madagascariensis, was known by the name of Theophrasta integrifolia, and B. spinosa by that of T. long folia; the whole of the species grow freely in a mixture of turfy loam and peat, and require to be grown in large pots, to show themselves to advantage. Cuttings strike root readily, either in old or young wood, taken off at a joint or not; even leaves taken off with a bud at the base of them, will strike root; but none of the leaves must be shortened; they must be planted in pots of sand, and require to be placed under a hand-glass in the propagation-house, in heat, and to be regularly watered when dry.

Bromelia. To this genus the Pine-apple belongs, which is in such general cultivation for the dessert. It is managed various ways by different gardeners, and with various success. The method we have seen succeed the best, is to

n 2

pot the young plants, in a mixture of one third loam and two thirds of half decayed leaves, in which they root very freely; they may then be plunged in frames or a stove, but not in too much bottom heat, or that will injure their roots, this is often done by cultivators, as they think to force them on by bottom heat, and by that means kill their plants, or injure them so much that they never perfectly recover ; they do not consider, that giving plants a strong bottom heat is working against nature, for in their native climate it is the sun that warms the ground in which they grow, and nature should be always studied in the cultivation of plants; and we find Pines thrive much better by keeping the house very warm and moist, and giving air early in the morning (the first thing if the weather permit), and shutting it up early in the afternoon. As soon as shut up, give a gentle sprinkling all over with an engine, which makes a fine steam arise, and the leaves never burn, but the plants grow astonishingly. When the plants are larger, add more loam to the soil they are potted in, and keep the pots well drained with small potsherds in the bottom. They should be carefully shifted into larger pots, so as not to damage their roots. When they are to be put in the fruiting-house, first turn the tan-bed all over to the bottom,

and add a sufficient quantity of fresh tan, so as to give a strong heat; then set the plants on the tan, but not plunge them till the heat begins to decline; where plenty of leaves can be procured, they need not be plunged at all, but, as soon as the heat declines, fill up between the pots with Oak or Chestnut leaves, which makes the heat arise as strong as is required; when the heat again declines, add another quantity of leaves, and so on, till the plants are half buried ; and water them frequently, but little at a time, and they will root in the leaves, and swell off their fruit to a great size; the suckers also root into the leaves, and grow to large plants before taken off, so that the plants fruit much earlier than by any other means. When the plants are wanted to show fruit, they should be checked by keeping them dry a considerable time; then, by watering them and giving them a little fresh heat, they fruit immediately. The Pine-house should be kept up as near as possible to 70 degrees of Fahrenheit’s thermometer, in winter; in summer it may be shut up at 100 degrees, or more. If the plants should be troubled with insects, the best composition we have seen to destroy them is, some camphor dissolved with spirits of wine, and mixed up with sulphur vivum and soot; after the plants are watered over, put some of the powder into the n 3

dry rose of a watering-pot, and shake it over any leaves that have the insects on them. The other species of Bromelia may be treated in the same way, or as common stove plants. They may be propagated by suckers, or from the crown of the fruit.

Bkosimum, or Bread-nut-tree, thrives well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat. Large old cuttings only, will strike root, not divested of their leaves, in a pot of sand, under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Broughtonia is a beautiful genus of the Orclii-deae; and like its nearest allies, thrives best in turfy peat soil, mixed with sand ; it also succeeds best in a hot-bed frame, or pit, in summer, where it will grow much more freely than in the hot-house, to which it must be removed in autumn, when it should be placed in a warm situation ; and requires at that season but little water; it is increased pretty readily by dividing at the root.

Brownea is a splendid genus, and very rare in our collections; a mixture of loam and peat suits it best; and care must be taken not to overwater it in winter. Cuttings should be taken from ripened wood, and plunged in a pot of sand, under a hand-glass, in a moist heat, where they will root without difficulty.

Brownlowia is a genus of stately growth, with large leathery leaves, and bearing panicles of yellow flowers; it makes a fine appearance when grown well, and where it has plenty of room to show itself, succeeding well in any rich loamy soil, or a mixture of sandy loam and peat will suit it as well as any thing; but as it is more tender than many Stove plants, it requires to be kept in a warm temperature in winter, or the points of the leaves are apt to turn brown, and many of them will drop off; young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass in heat, are not difficult to root.

Brucea thrives well in a loamy soil; and cuttings from ripened wood strike freely in sand, plunged under a hand-glass.

Brugmansia of Persoon is the Datura arborea, &c. of other authors; it is a free-flowering shrub, and not very tender, and its large white trumpet-shaped flowers make it desirable ; a rich light soil suits it well, or a mixture of loam and peat. It will succeed very well in a warm conservatory, so that it does not get too much wet in winter; we have also seen it thrive and flower luxuriantly, planted in the open ground, in a sheltered situation, much finer than in the house; but it must not remain out in winter, as it will not bear frost. It strikes readily from cuttings, in a moist heat. d 4

Brunellia belongs to the Connaraceae ; it succeeds well in a mixture of turfy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass on heat, strike root readily.

Brunsfelsia is a fine free flowering genus, with large white, fragrant flowers; they thrive well in loam and peat, or any rich light soil; and cuttings root freely in heat, under a hand-glass, in a pot of sand.

Brya belongs to the Leguminosae; it succeeds well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings not too much ripened will root readily in a pot of sand, placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

Bryonia is a genus of climbing plants with very large tuberous roots, and some of them are very pretty; rich soil suits them best; and young cuttings strike freely, under a hand-glass, planted in mould, and then placed in a moist heat.

Bryophyllum calycinum is a succulent plant; it requires very little water, except when growing freely, and the pot to be well drained; it flowers best plunged in a tan heat; a rich loamy soil suits it well. The leaves taken off' the plant, and laid on a pot of mould, or on the tan-bed, will shoot out young plants from the notches at the edge.

Bubroma, or Barbadoes Cedar, thrives well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat;

and cuttings root freely in sand, or mould, under a hand-glass.

Buchan an i a is a genus of East Indian plants belonging to Mr. Brown’s order Cassuvieae; its species grow freely in any light sandy loam; and cuttings, not too ripe, soon strike root in pots of sand, under a hand-glass, in heat; but their leaves must not be shortened, or they are apt to throw them off altogether, and then will not succeed.

Bucida, or Olive-bark-Tree, grows best in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings should be well ripened before taken off, and then planted in a pot of sand, and plunged, under a handglass, in heat.

Bumelia thrives well in aloamy soil, or loam and peat. Cuttings will root, but not freely, in sand, under a hand-glass : they should be well ripened before taken off.

Bunchosia is a pretty genus, belonging to the Malpighiaceae; its species are handsome, and are amongst the hardiest of stove plants: they succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat, or any other rich light soil; and cuttings, not too ripe, will root readily, if planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

Buonapartea is a genus belonging to the Bro-meliae, and nearly related to Tillandsia. It is

not the plant generally known by that name in the collections: that is the Agave geminijlora of the Journal of Science and Arts. Lyttcea geminiflora of some Authors, the true species of Buonapartece, are very different plants, more like parasitical Tillandsiae; they succeed best in peat soil, and to be grown in a hot-bed frame or pit in summer, in the same manner as the parasitical Orchidese.

Bursera grows well in a rich light soil, and large cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass, . in moist heat.

Burchellia is a beautiful genus, belonging to the Rubiaceae ; its species are hardy stove plants, and will succeed in a warm green-house; their beautiful scarlet and orange coloured flowers makes them very desirable for collections; they will grow freely in a mixture of light turfy loam and peat, or any other rich light soil; and cuttings not too ripe will root freely in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass.

Butea is a most splendid genus, and rare in the collections about London, though the species are free-growing plants, and not difficult to propagate. Loam and peat suits them best. Cuttings should be taken off’ at a joint, and planted in a pot of sand, without being deprived of any of their leaves; one pot is enough under a hand-

glass, as the leaves take up much room, and, if too confined, are apt to damp off. They should be plunged in a moist heat.

Buttneria belongs to Buttneriaceae ; it is of easy culture, thriving well in a mixture of loam and peat, or rich loam. Ripened cuttings root freely in mould, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Bvrsoniaia belongs to the Malpighiaceae; its species are handsome stove plants, and thrive well in a mixture of turfy loam and peat, or any other rich light soil; cuttings will root freely if taken off’ in the ripened wood, and planted in sand, and then placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

C.

Cacalia is a succulent genus, and its species easily managed : they flower best by being kept out of the house in summer; sandy loam suits them well, and they require very little water. Cuttings strike root freely, if laid to dry for a few days before they are planted.

Cactus is also a succulent genus, or rather order. Most of the species are fine bloomers. It is a very variable family, and now divided into several genera, but the same kind of treatment suits them all very well. Sandy loam, or loam mixed with a little brick rubbish, is the best soil for them ; they will also thrive well in sandy peat; the pots should be as small as the plants will allow, and well drained with potsherds; and they require very little water. The best way to flower them is to expose them to the air all the summer, and bruise their tops, to stop their growth; this throws them into flower-bud. Cuttings, after they are taken off', should be left to dry a few weeks till they are shrivelled, then potted, and they will root immediately. There are now several curious mule productions, in the various collections, some of which have flowered, and are particularly handsome.

Cacoucia, or Schousbcea of Willdenow, thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, and cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Cadia purpurea grows well in a light loamy soil, and cuttings will root under a hand-glass, in sand, plunged in heat.

C/Esalpinia, or Brasiletto, is a fine flowering genus, but seldom let grow to a size large enough to flower in our collections. The species are mostly very prickly plants, which makes them not so much admired. A mixture of loam and peat suits them well. Cuttings will not root freely, but will sometimes succeed if taken off in a growing state, but not too young, and plunged in a pot of sand, under a hand-glass, in moist heat.

C.esulia requires a rich loamy soil, and cuttings strike root freely.

Cajaxus belongs to the Papilionacese ; it is generally known by the name of Pigeon Pea; its species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat, or any other rich light soil, and is best raised from seed, or young cuttings; planted in pots of sand, and placed under hand-glasses, on heat, root readily.

Caladium is a genus belonging to the Aroideae, and was formerly joined with Arum. Several of the species grow freely in water, and most of them like a moist heat to grow in, and to be potted in rich soil. They are easily propagated by the tubers of the root.

Calamus is a fine genus of the Palm tribe, which thrives best in sandy loam, and likes a warm and moist atmosphere to grow in. This and other genera of Palms thrive well in Messrs. Loddiges’ Palm Stove, heated by steam, where their fine foliage make a grand appearance, and puts us in mind of the tropical countries of which they are natives.

Calaxdrixia is a pretty genus of succulent plants, with red or pink flowers, belonging to Portulaceae; its species are of easy culture, thriving well in any rich light soil, with the pots well drained that the wet may pass off readily, as nothing injures them so much as their pots being sodden with too much moisture, or to be planted in soil that is too heavy and retentive of moisture. Cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, will soon strike root without any covering.

Calanthe is a fine genus of Orchideous plants; it is a very abundant bloomer, and its fine spikes of white flowers make a very handsome appearance ; an equal mixture of turfy loam and peat is a very proper soil for it, and if grown in a frame, or close pit, in summer, it will grow much stronger than if kept in the house; the only method of increasing it is dividing it at the root.

Gala the a is a pretty genus belonging to the Canneae ; its species thrive well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of sandy loam and peat will suit them very well: they may be increased by seeds, or by dividing at the root.

Cai.ea thrives best in rich soil; and cuttings strike freely either in mould or sand ; its species are not ornamental.

Calenchoe is a succulent genus, the Verca of Andrews. It thrives best in sandy loam and brick rubbish mixed together, and should be plunged in the bark-pit to make it flower. The leaves placed on a pot of mould, or on the tan, will shoot out young plants from the notches of the margin, the same as Bn/ophyllum.

Callicarpa thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat: ripened cuttings strike root best in sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in heat.

Callisia is a herbaceous genus belonging to Commelineae; it thrives well in any rich light soil, and is increased by dividing at the root.

Calophyllum is a fine looking genus, and grows well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of turfy loam and peat: cuttings strike freely taken from ripe wood, and plunged under a hand-glass in a pot of sand, in moist heat.

Calotropis is a handsome flowering genus of the Asclepiadeae; a mixture of sandy loam and peat suits it well; and young cuttings root freely under a hand-glass, in a pot of sand ; they must not be crowded too many in a pot, or the leaves injured, as they are very apt to damp and get mouldy; as soon as rooted, they should be potted off, and placed in a hot-bed frame, where they must be shaded at first, and hardened off by degrees.

Calyptranthes is a genus belonging to the Myrtaceae ; it thrives best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; cuttings do not strike freely; ripened ones strike best, in sand, under a bell-glass ; the plants root best from layers.

Calyptkion is a pretty genus belonging to the Violariese ; its species succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat, and like a light airy situation, and not to be crowded with other plants; young-cuttings, planted in a pot of mould, and placed under a hand-glass, will strike root readily.

Camaridium is an Orchideous genus, related to Ornithidium; it thrives well in pots of turfy peat, and will also thrive on a tree, fixed up in a cocoa-nut shell; it is readily increased by taking off the young bulbs.

Caiieraria is a fine flowering genus, and thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings root freely, under a hand-glass, in a pot of sand.

Canarium belongs to the Burseraceae ; its species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root freely in a pot of sand, placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

Canavalia is a genus of handsome flowering climbing plants belonging to Papilionaceaj; the different species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

Canella alba thrives well in a loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings strike with difficulty; large old ones are best, taken off at a joint, and plunged in a moist heat, in a pot of sand, without depriving them of any of their leaves.

Canna, or Indian Shot, is a genus worthy of cultivation in all collections, as its lively flowers are produced in great abundance, and at all seasons ; many species are now in the collections; the most splendid is C. iridiflora, which is one amongst the handsomest plants of the stove ; rich light soil suit the species best: these are propagated by dividing at the root, or by seeds, which they produce in abundance.

Capparis thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat. C. spinosa and C. rupestris, are fine climbers, and produce abundance of handsome flowers, and sometimes seeds, when they are allowed plenty of room. Cuttings should be taken from young wood, and plunged under a hand-glass, in a pot of sand; several of the species produce handsome flowers.

Capraria, or Shrubby Goat Weed, grows well in sandy loam, or loam and peat. Cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Capsicum is a genus worthy of cultivation for the sake of its fruit, which is produced in great abundance, and is very useful in pickles, &c. besides being very ornamental. It is of easy culture, growing in any rich light soil, and is readily produced from seeds.

Caralluma is a genus of succulent plants related to Stapelia. It thrives best in a mixture of brick rubbish and loam, and the pot to be well drained with potsherds, broken small. The species require hardly any water, except at the

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flowering season, when they should be well supplied, but they require a great deal of heat. Cuttings, when taken from the plant, should be laid by to dry till they begin to shrivel, when they should be potted, and they will root immediately ; if planted as soon as taken off, they are apt to rot, from the abundance of juice with which the plant abounds.

C a rap a is a genus of strong growing plants, and one of them is generally known by the name of Afzclia splendens in the collections of London; they are chiefly desirable for their large glossy foliage, and thrive well in a rich loamy soil. Ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat, soon strike root.

Careya is a singular East Indian genus, related, but scarcely belonging to Myrtace*. C. herba-cca is a very handsome flowered plant, but the others are less beautiful; they all grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and the shrubby ones may be increased by cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed on heat under a handglass.

Carica, or Papaw-tree, thrives best in a loamy soil. Large cuttings, not deprived of their leaves, root best in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Carissa thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, and does not require much water: the pots should be well drained, as they are apt to get sodden. Cuttings strike root freely, under a bell-glass, in sand, plunged in heat.

Carolinea is a splendid genus, and thrives well in a rich loamy soil. Cuttings, taken off at a joint and not deprived of their leaves, will strike root in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Carpodontos thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings are not difficult to root, when planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass.

Caryophyllus aromaticus, or Clove-tree, will grow well in a mixture of loam and peat, but requires a strong dry heat, to flourish well; and cuttings are not difficult to root, though the plant is at present very scarce, owing to their being lost in winter; ripened cuttings root best in a pot of sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in a moist heat, without being deprived of any of their leaves.

Caryota is a genus of the Palm tribe, which thrives best in sandy loam.—See the management of Calamus.

Casearia belongs to Samydeee; its species thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings root without difficulty, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

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Cassia is a numerous genus; and several of the species are very ornamental and free flowerers. They thrive well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat. Some of them seed freely; and cuttings will root in a pot of sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Catalpa longissima thrives well in a light loamy soil; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Catasetum is one of the grand Orchideous genera, many species of which are now in our collections, where they produce their large magnificent flowers very freely; nothing can exceed the grandeur of some of them ; they are also very easily managed, thriving well in pots of turfy peat soil; and, like the rest of this natural order, succeed best in a hot-bed frame in summer, and to be removed to the stove in winter; they may be increased by dividing at the root.

Catesb/f.a, or Lily Thorn, is an ornamental genus, which grows best in light turfy loam and peat; but they are very apt to get infested with insects, which injure the plants very much ; and they will never thrive or flower, except kept cleaned off*. C. latifolia is a fine new species, which has produced its fine flowers at Mr. Col-

vill’s Nursery. Cuttings will root in sand, under a bell-glass, plunged in heat.

Cathartocarpus is a genus taken from Cassia, and requires the same treatment.

Cattleya is one of the finest of the Orchideous genera; its flowers are very grand, and its species grow freely, and are not difficult to increase; they grow very readily in light turfy peat soil, and will also thrive well on a tree set up in the stove, the outside to be covered with the outer husks of cocoa-nuts ; when planted, they only require to have their roots wrapped up in wet moss, and to be placed in one of the shells, where they will soon strike root, and their roots will grow into the shell and also into the bark of the tree, and will thrive well, if they are regularly supplied with water; in this manner they make a very singular and grotesque appearance, and flower very fine ; most of the species of Epiden-drum, Vanda, Vanilla, Cymbidium, Ornithidium, iErides, Renanthera, or any other parasitical Orchideous plant, will thrive well in the same way. The species of Cattleya that are planted in pots, thrive best in hot-bed frames, or pits, in summer, and at that season require a good supply of water; in winter they must be removed to a warm part of the stove, and at that season do not require so much moisture; they are increased by dividing at the root; this should be e 3

done immediately before their removal into the hot-bed, as they will then make fresh roots immediately.

Ceanothus thrives well in loam and peat; and cuttings strike root freely in sand, under a handglass.

Cecropia, or Snake-wood, likes a loamy soil; and large cuttings, in sand, under a hand-glass, will strike root readily.

Cedrela odorata grows well in a mixture of loam and peat, and cuttings will strike, under a handglass, in sand.

Cephaelis thrives well in loam and peat, and cuttings root freely, under a hand-glass, in sand; some of its species are very pretty.

Cerbera is a fine genus, belonging to the Apo-cyneae; it grows freely in loam and peat, and flowers abundantly. Cuttings strike very readily in sand, under a hand-glass, in moist heat; but they require very little water.

Cere us is by far the most beautiful and interesting genus belonging to the Cacteae ; some of its species produce the most splendid flowers that are grown in our Stoves, and many hybrid productions between the different species are now raised from seeds; a rich sandy loam is the best soil to have them grown strong in, though they will grow in almost any soil, by placing them out, in the open air in summer; and letting them

get well ripened with the sun, is the best means of having an abundance of bloom on them the following spring; the pots must be well drained, that the mould may not become sour or sodden with too much wet; in winter they want but little water ; but as soon as the flower-buds appear, they require a constant supply. Cuttings of all the sorts root readily, but they require to be dried a little before planting, or they will be apt to rot.

Chaitocalyx is a pretty genus of climbing plants belonging to Papilionaceae, thriving well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under hand-glasses, will root freely; but they require to be potted off as soon as rooted, or they are very liable to turn mouldy and damp off.

Cha i lleti a is a genus of tropical plants of little beauty; they thrive well in sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root readily in pots of sand, placed under hand-glass, in heat.

Cham^dorea is a genus of the Palm tribe, thriving best in a sandy loam and strong moist heat.

Chamarops is another genus of the Palm tribe, and requires the same treatment as the last genus.

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CiiEiitosTEMON is a fine genus belonging to Bom-baceae; it succeeds well in a mixture of turfy loam and peat, or any rich light soil; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of mould without shortening their leaves, and placed under a hand-glass in heat, will soon strike root.

Chilopsis is a handsome genus ofMexican plants, belonging to Bignoniaceag; and, as the species are deciduous shrubs, they will most probably succeed in the Green house, or perhaps in the open borders ; a mixture of loam and peat suits them well, or any rich light soil ; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand in spring, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat, will soon strike root; but, if planted late in the season, they will not make sufficient roots to stand the winter.

Chiococca racemosa, or Snowberry-bush, thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings strike root freely in sand, plunged under a hand-glass.

Chloranthus does very well in loam and peat, and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass. Several species are now in the collections; their flowers are rather inconspicuous, but they have a very agreeable scent, which makes them desirable.

Chlorophytum thrives best in a mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand; but their flowers are in-

conspicuous, and only worth cultivating in the collections of the curious.

Chomelia thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Ciiorisia is a handsome genus, belonging to Bom-baceae ; its species thrive well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of turfy loam and peat will suit them very well; young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under hand-glasses, in heat, will strike root readily.

Chrysobalanus, or Cocoa Plum, grows well in a sandy loam. Large cuttings root best, taken off at a joint, and planted thinly in a pot of sand, without having their leaves injured, and a hand-glass placed over them.

Ciirysophyllum, or Star Apple, is a fruit-bearing genus, with beautiful foliage : it thrives well in sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat; ripened shoots, taken off for cuttings, will strike root in sand, under a hand-glass, with a strong moist heat.

Cicca disticha thrives best in a sandy loam. Large cuttings, with all their leaves, planted thinly in sand, root freely, under a hand-glass.

Cinchona is the genus that produces the celebrated Peruvian bark: it is rare in the collections, and not of very free growth; the best soil

for it is loam and peat. Cuttings should be taken off when ripe and planted in a pot of sand, and plunged, under a hand-glass, in moist heat.

Cinnamomum belongs to the Laurinae, and consists of shrubs and trees that produce the Cinnamon and Cassia; its species thrive well in a mixture of two-thirds sandy loam and one-third peat; but they require a good deal of warmth, and but little water in winter: the pots in which they are planted must be well drained with potsherds, that the wet may pass off readily, as their roots are very fleshy, and will soon rot with too much moisture: ripened cuttings root readily in pots of sand, placed under hand-glasses, in heat; but their leaves, though large, must not be shortened, or it will weaken them very much.

Cirrhjea is a parasitical genus, belonging to the Orchidese: it thrives well in pots of light turfy peat, and succeeds best in hot-bed frames or pits, in summer, and in winter to be removed to the Stove; it may be increased, but slowly, by dividing it at the root.

Cissampelos is a genus of climbing plants, and interesting on account of its medicinal qualities: it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat, or in a rich loamy soil. Cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Cissus is another genus of climbers, scarcely different from Vitis. The species are free growers, and like a rich light soil. Cuttings root freely, under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Citharexylum, or Fiddle-wood, grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings root best in a pot of sand, under a hand-glass.

Clematis, or Virgin's Bower. The Stove species of this genus should have plenty of room to grow, or they will not flower. Rich light soil suits them best, and young cuttings strike readily under a hand-glass, in heat.

Cleome is a pretty and free-flowering genus, belonging to the Capparideae, and is easily managed : rich light soil suits it well; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass; most of the species seed freely, so that they are readily produced.

Clerodendrum is a fine genus, belonging to the Verbenaceae, and several species of it are cultivated in the collections at present. These grow freely in light rich soil, composed of half loam, one fourth rotten dung, and one fourth peat. They require a large pot to flower freely, and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass: the younger the better; they may also be increased by the cuttings of the roots, planted with their tops just above the surface of the mould, then plunged in a bark bed, or placed in a hot-bed frame; they will soon make young plants. The handsomest species are C. paniculatum, C. syua-matum, and C. macrophyUum.

Clidemia belongs to the Melastomaceae; its species are chiefly very hairy plants, producing small white flowers, not near so splendid as some of the other genera of this order : they all thrive well in a mixture of sandy peat and loam, or peat by itself will suit them very well. Young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, or in sand, and placed under hand-glasses in heat, will strike root almost immediately.

Clitoria is a pretty Papilionaceous genus, and flowers abundantly. It thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, and generally produces perfect seeds, but it requires to be kept in a warm situation. Cuttings will strike root under a bell-glass, plunged in heat.

Clusia requires the pots to be well drained, and a light sandy loam to grow in, as the species grow on other trees in tropical climates. Cuttings root very freely in sand, under a handglass.

Coccocypsilum repetis grows freely in loam and peat, and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Coccoloba, or Sea-side Grape, is remarkable for its immense leaves. The species grow freely in light loamy soil; and ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, and placed under a hand-glass, in a pot of sand, will root freely: one cutting under a glass is sufficient, as the leaves must not be shortened.

Cocculus is a climbing genus, belonging to the Menispermaceae, and is remarkable for its medicinal qualities. It requires plenty of room, or it will not flower. A mixture of loam and peat suits all the species well, and cuttings root easily under a hand-glass.

Cocos is a genus of the Palm tribe, to which the Cocoa-nut tree belongs. Light sandy loam suits the species best, and a warm moist atmosphere. They seldom succeed well in our collections: perhaps they are too much exposed to the sun; for we are informed they thrive best in the shade in the West Indies, where cultivators of them plant tall trees near them, on purpose for shade.

Codarium grows well in a mixture of loam and peat. Ripened cuttings strike best in sand under a hand-glass, in heat.

Ccelogyne is a genus of Orchideae, thriving well in a light turfy peat soil, and succeeding best in a hot-bed frame or pit in summer, and may be increased by dividing at the root.

Coffea, or Coffee-tree, thrives well in loam and peat: if kept clean and free from insects, it will flower and fruit abundantly. It requires a good deal of water and plenty of pot-room to thrive well. Ripe cuttings root easily in sand, under a hand-glass, in moist heat; and the young plants produce flowers and fruit more readily than those raised from seeds.

Coix Lachryma and agrestis, or Job’s Tears, is a genus of tropical Grasses. The species will grow readily in light rich soil, and flower and seed plentifully.

Colbertia coroimndeliana is Dillenia pentagyna of Roxburgh, a fine plant, with leaves resembling D. speciosa, but is readily recognized, the nerves of the leaves being villous underneath, in D. speciosa only slightly pubescent. It thrives well in sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat. Ripened cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, but must not be deprived of any of their leaves.

Colebrookia belongs to the Verbenacese; its species thrive well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, or any other light rich soil; and cuttings, not too much ripened, root readily in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Columnea is a pretty flowering genus of easy culture, and easily lost. It strikes very readily from cuttings, and grows well in a mixture of loam and peat, but will soon rot if it have too much water, or if kept in a damp part of the house.

Combretum is a genus of beautiful flowering climbers, many species of which are now introduced into our collections; they all thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely, under a hand-glass, in moist heat; they may also be increased by layers, which soon strike root.

Commelina is a herbaceous genus, and some of its species are very handsome. They grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and are increased by dividing the roots, and by seed.

Commersonia grows very well in a mixture of loam and peat, and cuttings will root readily, under a hand-glass, in sand.

Comocladia, or Maiden Plum, does well in a mixture of loam and peat, or of rich light soil. Ripened cuttings do best under a hand-glass, in sand, plunged in a moist heat.

Conocarpus, or Button-tree, thrives well in loam and peat; and cuttings, planted in sand, and plunged under a hand-glass, will strike root.

Conocephalus is a curious genus belonging to Urticeae, that grows freely in any rich light soil; and cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat, soon strike root.

Conostegi a belongs to the Melastomaceae; its species thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; the pots to be well drained with potsherds, that the wet may pass off readily. Young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, or in pots of sand, will soon strike root, if placed under a hand-glass, on a little bottom heat.

Cookxa, or Wampee-tree, is esteemed as a delicious tropical fruit, and is therefore much sought after by collectors; it requires a large pot to grow it well; and thrives well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, not deprived of any of their leaves, will strike root in a pot of sand, plunged, under a hand-glass, in moist heat.

Copaifera, or Balsam of Capevi, likes a sandy loam. Ripened cuttings do best in sand, under a hand-glass.

Cohchorus thrives well in a rich light soil; and cuttings root readily, under a hand-glass, in a pot of the same kind of soil; young cuttings are best.

Cordia thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat: it is a pretty flowering genus, and easily managed. Cuttings strike best in sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in heat.

Coreopsis grows freely in rich light earth, and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Cornutia thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, and cuttings will strike root in sand, plunged under a hand-glass.

Corvpha is a beautiful genus of the Palm tribe, and requires a sandy loam to grow in, and a strong moist heat, to grow in perfection.

Cossignea is a plant generally admired on account of the orange-coloured nerves of its leaves, which produce a handsome appearance. It is generally known in the collections about London by the name of Ruisia aurea; how it came by that name we cannot imagine, as it has not the least affinity to Ruizia. It thrives well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, in moist heat.

Costus is a genus belonging to the Scitamineae, and grows well in sandy loam and peat; it is increased by dividing the roots, and by seed.

Cotula likes a rich light soil, and is readily increased by cuttings.

Coulteria isagenus relatedtoC^sALPiNiA; its species thrive well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a handglass, on a little bottom heat, will root readily. The greater part of the plants belonging to Le-guminosae, strike best by the cuttings being taken off when quite young, and planted ; as when they get too ripe, the wood becomes so hard, that they are a long time in making roots, if ever they make any at all.

Crat.eva likes a rich soil, composed of loam, peat, and rotten dung. Cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Cremanium belongs to the Melastomaceae, most of its species producing small white flowers; they thrive well in a sandy peat soil, or a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted

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in the same sort of soil, or in sand, and placed under hand-glasses, on heat, root readily.

Ckescentia, or Calabash tree, is a fine-looking genus, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings well ripened will root in a pot of sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in moist heat.

Crinum is a fine stately genus of the Amaryllideae; several beautiful species are now in the collections. They grow best in rich loam, mixed with a little peat and sand, to keep it open, and potted in large pots, they will flower abundantly. They may be increased by suckers from the root. If the plants are shy in producing suckers, they may be cut down near to the root, and they would send out plenty; or by wounding the root will make them produce suckers. C. amabile is one of the finest species of the genus, but requires a great deal of room ; when of sufficient size, it will produce its magnificent flowers several times in one year; those, as well as being handsome, are delightfully fragrant, and scent the whole house in which they are grown.

Cross an dr a is a genus belonging to the Acantha-ceae, a very abundant flowerer, and easily managed. It thrives well in rich light soil, or in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings strike very readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Crotalaria is an abundantly flowering genus, and several of the species are very handsome. Loam and peat suit them well. Young cuttings root best, planted in a pot of sand, and a bell-glass placed over them. Some species ripen plenty of seeds.

Croton does well in a mixture of loam and peat; and some of the species are much admired for their variegated leaves. Those must be grown entirely in a mixture of peat and sand, or the leaves will soon become green, and loose all their variegation. Cuttings root very freely in sand, or in peat, under a hand-glass, in moist heat; but the leaves must not be shortened, as it weakens them so much that they seldom come to any thing, even if they succeed in striking root.

Crudya belongs to the Leguminosae, and to the tribe Cassieae ; its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and young cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will strike root freely.

Cryptarrhena is a genus of the Orchideae, and requires the same treatment as Aerides, &c.

Cryptolepis is a genus of climbing plants, belonging to Apocineae ; its species thrive well in a mixture of rich loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will root readily; but they must have very little water, when first planted, or they will be apt to rot.

Cryptostegia grandijlora is a beautiful climbing plant, belonging to the Apocyneae. It thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, and cuttings F 2

strike root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Cupania succeeds well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root readily in a pot of sand, placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

Curatella is a genus belonging to the Dillenia-ceae, growing to a small tree, with very rough leaves. It thrives best in a sandy loam. Cuttings should be taken from ripened wood, and plunged under a hand-glass, in a pot of sand.

Curculigo thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, and is increased by off-sets from the roots.

Curcuma,or Turmeric,requires a light rich earth, and is increased by off-sets from the root.

Cvathea is a genus of the Fern tribe, and likes a mixture of loam and peat. It is increased by dividing it at the root, or by seeds.

Cvcas is a genus related to the Palms, and also to the Ferns : sandy loam suits it best, and a strong heat. The leaves of some of the species will die wherever they are touched with the hand, in the same manner as Onodea sensibilis.

Cyclantiius is a genus belonging to Aroideae, consisting of scarcely any beauty, except its large leaves; it succeeds well in a rich loamy soil, and is readily increased by dividing at the root.

Cyli sta is a climbingPapilionaceous genus, which succeeds well in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Cymbidium is a genus of the Orchideae, which thrives best in sandy peat, and requires plenty

of pot room for their large and numerous roots ; like the rest of the family, they succeed best in a hot-bed frame in summer, where they will produce their pretty and fragrant flowers in abundance ; as soon as the flowers of this or any other genus begin to expand, they should be removed to the hot-house, or their beauty will not so likely be seen. The species are increased by parting them at the root.

Cyminosma is a handsome evergreen genus belonging to Rutacese ; its species are well clothed with glossy leaves not unlike those of a Myrta-ceous plant; they thrive well in a mixture of light loam and peat; and ripened cuttings soon strike root, in pots of sand, placed under a handglass, on bottom heat.

Cynanchuim is a climbing genus of the Asclepi-adeae. It thrives well in loam and peat, and cuttings strike root freely in sand, under a handglass.

Cynometra grows best in sandy loam, or loam and peat. Large cuttings root best planted in sand, and plunged in heat under a hand-glass.

Cyperus grows best in water, or in a pot placed in a pan of water: the species may be increased by dividing them at the root, or by seeds.

Cyrtopodium is a handsome genus of the Orchi-deae ; thriving well in pots of turfy peat, and does best in a hot-bed frame or pit in summer; it is not very free of increase, but may be occasionally increased by dividing at the root.

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D.

D.emia is a genus of the Asclepiadeae, and requires the same treatment as Cynanchum.

Dalbergia requires a sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat. Young cuttings do best under a hand-glass, in sand.

Dalechampia is a climbing genus, and grows best in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Dammara is a handsome genus, belonging to the Conifer® ; its species grow freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, but they are difficult to propagate by cuttings, which makes them continue scarce: we have succeeded in rooting a few, by taking the cuttings off as soon as ripened, and planted them in pots of sand, placing them under hand-glasses, on a bottom heat.

Daphne thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat. Ripened cuttings will root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, or its species will all succeed well, if grafted on the common Wood Laurel, (D. Laureola), or the Mazerion; many handsome hybrid species have been lately raised from seeds.

Daubentonia is a handsome flowering genus, belonging to Papilionaceae; its species thrive well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and young cuttings may be rooted in pots of sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

D a vya belongs to the Melastomacese ; its species thrive well in peat soil, and a little loam mixed with it; they are readily increased by cuttings planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Dendrobium is a beautiful genus of the Orchi-deae, and thrives well in pots of turfy peat, if placed in the hot-bed frame in summer, and to be moved into the Stove in winter; some of the species are very grand plants and free bloomers. The greater part of them are readily increased, by dividing at the root.

Desmanthus is a genus divided from Mimosa, and some of the species are very handsome; they grow well in a mixture of loam and peat; and some of them, as D. natans, &c. thrive best in water. They might be increased by seeds or cuttings; the latter succeed best taken off in the young wood, and planted in sand, under a bell -glass

Desmodiuji is a genus separated from Hedysa-rum, and some of its species are very handsome; they all grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and are increased by seeds; or young cuttings planted in pots of sand, the smaller sorts placed under bell-glasses, and the larger under hand-glasses on heat; they will soon strike root.

Desmoncus is a genus of Brazilian Palms, that

f 4

grow best in a sandy loam, and require the same treatment as the other genera belonging to the same family.

Detarium belongs to the Leguminosae, and thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, are not difficult to root.

Dicerma is a genus separated from Hedysarum ; its species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; they may be increased by seeds, or young cuttings, planted in sand, and placed on heat, under a hand-glass, root readily.

DrcuoxDRA thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely.

Dicksonia is a fine genus of the Ferns, and grows well in loam and peat; it is increased by dividing it at the root, or by seeds.

Dicliptera is a genus related to Justicia, and belongs to Acanthaceae; its species thrive best in a rich light soil, and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of mould, and placed under hand-glasses on heat, soon strike root.

Dillenia is a splendid Indian genus, and thrives well in the collections of this country. A light loamy soil suits it best, or a mixture of loam and peat. Ripened cuttings, not deprived of their leaves, strike root freely, in a pot of sand plunged under a hand-glass, in heat. Good seeds sometimes arrive from India, when the sooner they are sown the better, and placed in a moderate hot-bed frame, where they will succeed well.

The plants will not bear being smoked with tobacco; if they are let remain in a house that is smoked, the leaves will turn brown, and many of them will drop off. The houses in which they are kept, should never be suffered to get below CO degrees of Fahrenheit’s thermometer; if it does, that will also injure their leaves.

Dinetus is a genus of climbing plants, belonging to Convolvulacese; the perennial species grow freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots, in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass in heat, will strike root in a few days : the annual species thrive well as green-house or as hardy annuals, and, if sown early, and planted out, will climb to a great height before winter; they produce their flowers in autumn.

Dioscokea, or Yam. Its species are cultivated in tropical climates for the sake of the roots, which are used in the same way as potatoes, and are much esteemed. The species are climbing plants, with handsome foliage, and grow freely in rich light soil; they are readily increased by parting their roots.

Diospyrus grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat. Ripened cuttings succeed best, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass in heat.

Diplazium is a genus of the Ferns which grows well in loam and peat, and might be increased by dividing them at the root.

Diplochita belongs to the Melastomaceae ; its species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under hand-glasses, in heat, root freely.

Diplolepis is a genus of climbing plants, belonging to Asclepiadeae; its species grow freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat, will root readily.

D ipterix odorata is Baryosma Tonga of Gaert-ner. The seed is known by the name of Tonquin Bean. It likes a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root best in sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Dischidia is a trailing succulent genus, belonging to Asclepiadeee, and is most probably parasitical in India; it will thrive well in any light sandy soil; and cuttings, stuck into pots of any sort of earth, will soon strike root, without any covering.

Dissolena belongs to the Apocyneee; it grows freely in any rich light soil; and cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under hand-glasses, in heat, will soon strike root.

Dolichos grows freely in a rich light soil, and generally ripens plenty of seeds. Cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Dojibeya thrives well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, or any rich light soil; and young cuttings will root in a pot of sand, placed under a hand-glass, in moist heat.

Dorstknia grows freely in a light rich soil, and is increased by parting the roots, or by seed.

Dory a nth es excelsa is generally treated as a Stove plant; but it will do well in a greenhouse, and is more likely to flower. It may be increased (but sparingly) by suckers from the root. Cutting a large plant down, or taking out the heart of the plant, will make it throw out suckers.

Dracaena thrives well in a light loamy soil; large cuttings root freely by being stuck in the tan, in a brisk heat.

Dracontium likes a light rich soil, and is increased by dividing the roots.

Drepanocarpus belongs to the Papilionaceae; its species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a handglass, on heat.

Duranta is a pretty and free-flowering genus, and thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

E.

Ecastapiiyllum belongs to the Papilionaceae; its species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and plunged under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Echites is a beautiful flowering genus belonging to the Apocyneae, and a genus divided from it by Dr. Wallich, under the name of Beaumontia, has produced its flowers, at Messrs. Whitley and Co’s. Nursery, at Fulham ; they all grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings strike root readily under a hand-glass, in sand.

Ehretia thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike readily under a handglass.

El.eagnus latifolia likes a mixture of loam and peat. Ripened cuttings root freely under a hand-glass, in a pot of sand.

El/Eocarpus is a pretty tribe of plants, and its curious jagged petals make a singular appearance; the fruit when ripe is blue, and very ornamental ; its species thrive best in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripe cuttings strike best in sand, under a hand-glass; they may also be raised from seeds, which ripen plentifully, if pains be taken to fertilize the stigmas, when in full bloom.

El^eodendrum, or Olive-wood, likes a mixture of loam and peat, and some of the species are very handsome. Ripened cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

El a is guineensis, or Oily Palm, grows best in a sandy loam and strong heat.

Elate is a genus of the Palms, and requires the same treatment as the last.

Elettaria cardamomum, or Cardamom Plant, thrives well in a rich sandy loam, mixed with peat; and is readily increased by dividing it at the root.

Embryopteius, orDiospyros Embryopteris, grows freely in sandy loam, or loam and peat. Ripened cuttings will strike root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, in moist heat.

Entada belongs to theMimoseae; its species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and plunged in heat, under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Ephielis fraxima grows best in a light loamy soil; and large cuttings root best under a hand-glass, in sand.

Epidendruji is a parasitical genus of the Orchi-deee, and grows on trees or rocks in tropical climates. The species will grow hung up in baskets of moss, or fixed in moss to other plants, or to the stump of a tree set up for the purpose, surrounded by the outer shells of Cocoa-nuts; if planted in pots, the soil should be turfy peat, that is very sandy, if not sandy enough, some sand must be mixed with it; in summer they grow more freely, and flower better, by being grown in a hot-bed pit or frame, in moist heat, so as to be shaded with mats from the burning sun in very warm weather ; when the plants are forward towards blooming, they should be removed to the hot-house, where the colours will be finer than if left in the frames; they must also be removed to the hot-house about the middle or end of September, according to the mild-

ness of the season, as they will be liable to get damp and mouldy, if left too long in the frames; the pots in which they are grown must be well drained with potsherds at the bottom. They are readily increased by dividing them at the root.

Euanthemum grows freely in a rich light soil, and produces abundance of flowers. Cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in pots of mould.

Euia is a genus of Orchideous plants, that thrives best in pots of turfy peat soil, and to be kept like the rest of its tribe in close pits or hot-bed frames in summer; its species are increased by dividing them at the root.

Eriodendron belongs to the Bombaceae; its species thrive well in a mixture of turfy loam and peat; and cuttings are not difficult to root, if planted in pots of the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

Eriol.ena belongs to the Buttneriaceae, and also succeeds well in a mixture of turfy loam and peat. Cuttings not too ripe, will soon strike root, if planted in pots of the same sort of soil, and placed in heat, under a hand-glass.

Erythrina is a handsome genus, with fine large leaves and splendid flowers; its species thrive well in a light loamy soil. The best way to flower them is to place them on a dry shelf in winter, when they have no leaves, and give them scarcely any water: when they show flower-bud, they may be plunged in a moist heat, which will make the flowers finer than they would be, if the

plants stay out till they are in bloom. The handsomest species are E. crista-galli, and E. lauri-folia, which grow freely, and produce their magnificent flowers more readily than any other species; there are plants of them in the nursery of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, at Fulham, that are turned out in the open border, by the side of a wall; where they have stood well several winters, only becoming herbaceous, and throwing up their strong flowering shoots in summer, which make a grand appearance; the flowers are also of a more brilliant colour, than when grown in the hot-house; the only covering they have is a little dry dung, put tight down on their crowns, while the frosts last, and, as soon as cleared away in spring, they begin to grow, and produce an abundance of flowers through the summer. Cuttings taken off at a joint, and planted in sand, without being deprived of any of their leaves, strike root readily under a hand-glass, in moist heat.

Erythrophleum, or Red Water-tree, belongs to the Mimoseae; it thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will strike root without difficulty.

Eucrosi a is a beautiful genus of the Amaryllidea?, and grows best in a mixture of light turfy loam, mixed with a great deal of sand, and a little peat; the pots must be also well drained with potsherds. It is increased by off-sets from the bulb, or by seeds.

Eugenia is a fine genus, and several of the species are cultivated as fruit-trees in tropical climates. E. malaccensis, or Malay Apple-tree, in particular, is greatly esteemed. The species thrive well in a mixture of two thirds sandy loam, and one third peat, and flower abundantly, when the plants are of a good size. Ripened cuttings strike root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Eulophia is a genus belonging to Orchideae, and some of its species arc very handsome; they grow freely in a sandy peat soil, and increase pretty readily by dividing at the root.

Euphorbia is a very variable genus, or rather order of plants. Several species are of a succulent nature, and require but little water; but to be planted in a dry soil, consisting of loam and old brick and lime rubbish. All abound with a milky juice. E. punicea is much admired, on account of the fine scarlet bractes which surround the flower. The way we have succeeded best in striking the cuttings, is to stick them in the tan amongst the pots, in a good heat, and not cover them with any glass ; but the best way of getting good plants is from seed, which will ripen plentifully, if care be taken to fertilize the stigmas with the pollen, when in bloom.

Euphoria, orLee-Chee, is a fruit bearing genus, the Scytalia of Gaertner, and Dimocarpus of Will-<lenow: it succeeds well in a light loamy soil, ora mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily, taken off in the ripened wood, and planted in a pot of sand, which must be placed under a hand-glass in a gentle bottom heat.

El'eva is a genus belonging to Ternstrcemiaceae, which will succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat; they are not very tender, and maybe preserved in a good Greenhouse ; ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, and planted in pots either of sand or sandy soil, and placed under a hand-glass, on a little heat, will soon strike root.

Eurvale ferox is an aquatic plant, belonging to the Nymphaeaceee, and requires to be continually in water; it will seed freely, if some pollen be shook on the stigmas when in bloom, which is the only method of increasing it: its ample leaves make a magnificent appearance floating on the surface of the water.

Eurycles is a genus of Amaryllideae, consisting of three known species, originally confused under Pancratium amboinense; the whole of them have flowered at Mr. Colvill’s Nursery, one with the stamens inserted in a crown, which is the Pancratium amboinense of authors; another with winged stamens, not connected, into a crown, from New Holland; and the third with naked stamens, the Crinum nervosum of Roxburgh, received from the Botanic Garden at Calcutta, under that name; they are all handsome plants, and flower freely, if properly managed, succeed-

G

ing well in a mixture of sandy loam, and a little peat or other light soil to keep it open; and when in a growing state, they require a good supply of water, and very little when in a dormant state ; their flowers are very fragrant.

Eurycoma belongs to Connaraceae ; it succeeds well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass on heat, will soon strike root.

Eustoma is a handsome plant belonging to Gen-tianeae, with fine purple flowers; it is a perennial Stove plant, and requires to be grown in a light sandy soil; a mixture of light turfy loam, peat, and sand, will suit it well; and young cuttings wall soon strike root, if placed under a hand-glass on a little heat, planted in sand or light sandy soil, but they must not be planted too close together, or they will be liable to damp off.

Euterpe is a genus of Palms, which requires to be grown in a sandy loam, and require a good strong heat to grow freely.

Evodia belongs to the Rutaceae; it succeeds well in a mixture of light loam and peat; and young cuttings strike root readily, in a pot of sand, placed under a hand-glass.

Evolvulus belongs to the Convolvulaceae; the perennial species succeed well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, will root in a few days ; but they must not be allowed to be covered up close for any length of time, or they will damp off.

Exccecarja belongs to the Euphorbiaceae ; its species succeed well in a sandy loam; and young cuttings strike root freely under a handglass in the same sort of soil.

Exostemma is a pretty genus, separated from Cinchona; it consists of several species, the bark of some of which have been supposed to have been possessed of the same qualities as the true Cinchona, or Peruvian Bark ; but, according to St. Hilaire, it is quite destitute of any such qualities : its species thrive best in a mixture of light turfy loam and peat, and cuttings root best, when not too ripe, taken off at a joint, and planted in pots of sand, which must be placed under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

F.

Fagara grows freely in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Fagr^ea belongs to the Apocineae, and its species grow freely in sandy loam and peat; young cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Fernandesia is a genus of the Orchideae, and requires precisely the same sort of treatment as Epidendrum and Oncidium.

Fernelia is a genus belonging to Rubiaceae; it

g 2

consists of elegant little shrubby plants, with glossy little Box-like leaves, and are well deserving a place in any Stove collection ; they grow freely in a mixture of turfy loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in a pot of sand, under a bell-glass, in the Stove.

Feronia, or Elephant Apple, likes a mixture of loam and peat. Ripe cuttings will root under a hand-glass, in sand.

Ficus, or Fig-tree, is an extensive genus, and easily cultivated. The species will all thrive in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings with their leaves not injured, strike root readily in sand under a hand-glass, in heat; the handsomest and most noted Stove species is F. elastica, which produces a species of Caoutchouc, or Indian Rubber.

Fischeria is a climbing genus belonging to As-clepiadeae; a mixture of loam and peat is the most proper soil for it; and young cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Flacourtia does best in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Flagellaria indica is a water plant, and requires to be grown in a Stove Aquarium, or in a tub of water with mud to grow in, like the other water plants.

Flemingia is a Papilionaceous genus; it grows very freely in loam and peat, but the flowers are

not very showy. Cuttings will root under a hand-glass, in sand, plunged in heat.

Flindersia belongs to the Meliaceae ; its species grow freely in a mixture of turfy loam and peat; and cuttings strike root readily in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass.

Fcetidia is a genus from Madagascar, lately introduced by the late Robert Barclay, Esq. of Bury-hill, in which collection we lately saw it growing; the best soil for it is a mixture of light turfy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will doubtless strike root.

Freziera belongs to the Ternstroemiacae, and succeeds best in a light rich soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit it very well; ripened cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

FuRCRfEA is a genus related to Agave, and requires the same treatment as that genus.

G.

GvF.rtnera racemosa, or Hiptagc madablota, is a fine climbing plant, which thrives well in loam and peat; it requires plenty of room to grow, or it will not flower. Cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Gagnebina is a pretty genus from the Mauritius, belonging to Mimoseae; like the rest of the tribe, its species succeed well in a mixture of sandy

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loam and peat, and may be freely raised from seed; or young cuttings, taken off at a joint, and planted in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass on bottom heat, will root readily.

Galactia pmdula is a pretty flowering climber, which grows freely in loam and peat. Cuttings will root in sand under a bell-glass; it also produces ripe seeds with care.

Galega thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a bell-glass.

Galjpea grows best in a light loamy soil, and cuttings strike freely in sand under a hand-glass.

Galphimia is a fine genus belonging to the Mal-pighiacese; its species thrive well in a mixture of rich turfy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings soon strike root in pots of sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Garcinia is an interesting genus, much admired for its fruit. It thrives best in a light loamy soil mixed with a little peat, requires a strong heat to flourish well; ripe cuttings root best in sand, under a hand-glass, in moist heat.

Gardenia is a beautiful genus of plants, belonging to the Rubiaceae, and most of the species are free flowerers. They thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat, in a moist heat. Cuttings not too ripe, root freely in sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in heat.

Gardoquia is a genus belonging to Labiatre; its species are natives of the West Indies; they grow

freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Garuga belongs to the Burseraceae; it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, the greater part loam; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will root without difficulty.

Gastonia belongs to the Araliaceae; it succeeds well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, soon strike root.

Gaudichaudia is a climbing genus belonging to Malpighiaceae; like the rest of the natural order, it thrives well in a mixture of light turfy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass, on heat.

Gaya is a genus belonging to the Malvaceae, and succeeds well in a mixture of loam and peat, or any rich vegetable mould; and cuttings not too ripe will root readily, if planted in pots of the same sort of mould, and placed under a handglass, in heat.

Geissomeria is a genus of handsome scarlet flowering plants, belonging to Acanthaceae, and allied to Justicia; a light rich soil suits them best, composed of loam and well decayed dung; and young cuttings, planted in pots of the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, on a little heat, will root in a few days.

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Gelonium is an East Indian genus belonging to Euphorbiaceae; its species succeed well in a sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Genipa, or Genip-tree, is nearly allied to Gardenia, and requires the same treatment.

Geodorum is a curious genus of the Orchideae, and grows best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; if grown in a hot-bed pit or frame in summer, the species will succeed much better than in the hot-house, and will be more likely to flower, and produce suckers. The only method of increasing them, is by dividing them at the root.

Geoffroya grows freely in sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings will strike root in sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in heat.

Geonoma is a genus of Palms, requiring a rich light sandy loam, and a good strong heat, to make them grow in perfection.

Gesneria thrives well in a light rich soil. Cuttings root readily either in sand or mould, under a hand-glass, in heat. Several handsome species are now in the collections.

Getonia grows best in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Ginoria belongs to the Lytharieae; the G. amc-ricana is a native of Cuba, and bears handsome blue flowers; it grows readily in a rich loamy soil, mixed with a little peat; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass in sand, will soon strike root.

Gleicheni a is a genus of Ferns ; the Stove species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and are increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds ; the seeds of Ferns vegetate freely by sowing them on the surface of a pot of mould without covering them with earth, but a little moss placed on the surface, to keep them from being dried up by the air.

Globba is a genus belonging to the Scitamineae; its species grow best in a mixture of loam, peat, and sand, and are readily increased by dividing them at the root.

Gloriosa is a beautiful and curious Liliaceous genus; of which there are now several species known; one found in Africa, by Mr. George Don, is most probably the same as was previously discovered by Mr. David Lockhart. In Mr. David Don’s Prodromus Florae Nepalensis, another species is described, native of Nepaul; all the species are beautiful and singular plants, and are well worth cultivating in the Stove. We have found them succeed best, and flower luxuriantly, by being planted in rather more than one third turfy loam, full one third white sand, and the remainder peat; as soon as planted to be set in a hot-bed frame, till they have began to grow; then move them to a warm part of the hot-house ; and as they grow train them up a stick or wire, where they will flower; and if a little pains be taken to fertilize the stigmas with the pollen when in bloom, they will produce plenty of seeds, which should be sown as soon as gathered; after flowering, the stems must be let die down, and they require no more water; the pots may then be laid on their sides, in a dry situation, and there left till the March following, when they should be planted. The following method of treatment is given by the late Mr. John Sweet, in the Horticultural Society’s Transactions: “ When the “ stalks and foliage have decayed, in the au-“ tumn, and left the root, like a well-ripened “ potatoe, in a dormant state ; the pot in which “ it is, must be removed from the bark-bed (to “ a dry part of the house), at some distance “ from the fire : all the warmth at this time ne-“ cessary, being merely what is sufficient to “ keep the earth in the pot free from damp; “ and to prevent the waterings of the house, or “ other moisture, falling on the earth in the pot; “ it should be covered, by inverting upon it “ another pot of the same size ; or if larger, it “ will hang over its edges, and more effectually “ exclude the wet. If the roots are small, two “ or three may be placed together in the same pot, whilst in their dormant state ; but if they “ are thus shifted, the mould must be well sha-“ ken down in the pot, in order to prevent the “ access of air to them : the old mould in which “ they grew must also be used; for fresh earth,  or sand, would stimulate them to move too “ early. About the second week in March, the “ roots must be replanted, putting one or two “ according to their size into pots measuring six “ inches over. The best compost for them is “ fresh loam, mixed with an equal quantity of “ peat mould, of good quality; the loam should “ be good, not over-rich with dung, nor too heavy. “ The roots are to be covered about two inches “ deep ; and care must be taken not to break “ them, unless nature has shown where it is “ practicable to divide them easily. The pots, “ when filled, must be plunged into the bark-“ bed, where the heat should be equal to 95 decrees of Fahrenheit’s scale. Water is to be “ given very sparingly at first; and though, as “ they grow, they will require a more liberal “ supply, yet it is necessary at all times to be “ very moderate in giving it. The heat must “ be well kept up ; and as the shoots extend, “ they must be supported. Under such treat -“ ment as I have described, I have known one “ plant grow ten feet in the course of a season, “ and to have numerous blossom-stems upon it.” It is readily increased by dividing the roots, or by seeds, which ripen in abundance.

Gloxinia is a pretty genus belonging to the Ges-nereae, and thrives best in a light rich soil, or a mixture of loam, peat, and sand, will suit it very

well. G. maculata is readily increased by dividing it at the root. It should be kept free from suckers, and only a single plant in a pot, that it may grow strong to flower. G. speciosa flowers abundantly, and strikes freely from cuttings. The leaves taken off close to the stem, and planted, will strike root, and make a plant, without being covered with glass.

Glycine thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings strike root readily, in sand, under a bell-glass, in heat.

Glycosmis is a genus separated from Limonia; the flowers are white, and orange-scented; they make pretty plants, and are well worth cultivating ; a mixture of loam and peat is the proper soil for them; and ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, and planted in sand, under a hand-glass, are not difficult to root.

Gjielina grows freely in loam and peat, or sandy loam; and cuttings do best in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Gnetum belongs to the Urticeae; it thrives well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, root freely.

Godoya belongs to the Guttifene; it succeeds well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam with a little peat; and ripened cuttings root readily, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, with a good bottom heat.

Gomesa is a genus of the Orchidese, and thrives

well in pots of sandy peat soil; like the rest of the family it succeeds best in a hot-bed frame in summer; but being of a succulent nature, it requires but little water; and the pots to be well drained with small potsherds; they are increased by dividing at the root.

Gompjiia, or Button-flower, thrives well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and cuttings will strike root in sand, under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Gompiirena, or Globe Amaranth, grows best in a rich light soil; and young cuttings strike root readily under a hand-glass, in pots of mould.

Gomutus, a genus of Palms, natives of the East Indies, requiring a rich sandy loam, and a good heat.

Gongora is a parasitical genus of Orchideae, and requires precisely the same sort of treatment as Epidendrum, and may be increased by dividing at the root, the suckers to be placed in a hotbed.

Gonolobus is a climbing genus of the Asclepia-deae, which grows freely in loam and peat; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in pots of mould.

Gonostemon is a succulent genus, separated from Stapelia by Mr. Haworth; the flowers of the whole of the tribe are very curious, and many of them beautiful, but the greater part have a disagreeable scent: the best soil to grow them in is a sandy loam, mixed with a large proportion of old lime and brick rubbish, being apt to rot if planted in richer soil, particularly if they get too much water, a very little of which is sufficient for them, except when growing freely, or at the season of their flowering; they will then need a good supply to keep them in vigour, and make them produce fine flowers: they are readily increased by cuttings, which should lay by some time to dry up the wound before planting, they are otherwise very liable to rot; the plant from which they are taken should also be in a stunted or withered state at the time, or they are apt to receive such a wound that they frequently never recover.

Goodyera is a genus of the Orchideae, and thrives best in peat soil. It is readily increased by suckers from the root.

Gossypium, or Cotton-tree, thrives best in a rich light soil: the species generally ripen plenty of seeds, which are enveloped in cotton. Cuttings not too much ripened will strike root freely, under a hand-glass, in mould.

Gouania grows freely in loam and peat; and ripened cuttings will strike root freely, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Grammitis is a genus of Ferns; the Stove species thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and will succeed very well amongst the other plants, or at the back of the house where nothing else will thrive; they maybe increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Grangeria belongs to the Chrysobalaneas; it

succeeds well in a rich loamy soil; and ripened cuttings, taken off'at a joint, and planted in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass in bottom heat, will soon strike root.

Grevillea is a fine genus belonging to the Pro-teacea;, several Stove species of which have of late years been introduced to our collections, from within the tropical part of New Holland; those are rather difficult to manage, as they will not do in the common Greenhouse, and the Stove is rather too warm for them; an intermediate kind of house would suit them best, as well as many other plants; where there is not such a one, the coldest and most airy part of the Stove is most suitable; the best soil for them is an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand, and the pots to be well drained with potsherds; ripened cuttings will strike root in pots of sand, under hand-glasses; but care must be taken that they do not get too moist, or they will damp off.

Grewia thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings do best in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Grias, or Anchovy Pear-tree, grows best in a loamy soil; and large cuttings succeed best under a hand-glass, in heat.

Griffinia is a fine genus of bulbs belonging to the Amaryllideae; we find them succeed best in a mixture of rather more than one third of turfy loam, a third of white sand, and the rest peat; keeping them quite dry when in a dormant state;

but as soon as they begin to grow or show bloom, they must be well supplied with water; an airy situation suits them best; they may be increased by offsets, from the bulbs, or by seeds.

Grislea tomentosa is a pretty plant, and an abundant flowerer. It thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root freely in sand, under a bell-glass, in heat.

Gronovia scandals is a climbing plant, belonging to the Cucurbitaceae, or Gourd tribe. It thrives well in a rich loamy soil; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in heat.

Gcaiacum, or Lignum Vitae Tree, grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings of it are generally supposed to be difficult to root; but we find ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, root readily, planted thin in a pot of sand, and plunged under a hand-glass, in heat. When the cuttings are rooted, which will be easily perceived by their growing at the top, they should be potted off; when great care must be taken not to break off the young roots, in taking the sand from them, as they are very small and easily broken. Pot them off in very small pots, and keep them under a close glass for a few days, till they have struck fresh root, when they must be exposed to the air by degrees.

Guarea trichiloides grows freely in loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root best under a handglass, in sand.

Guatter i a is a genus belonging to the Anonaceae,

and requires a loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat. Ripe cuttings strike best in sand, under a hand-glass.

Guazuma is a genus belonging to the Buttneri-aceae; its species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat, or any rich light soil; and cuttings root without difficulty, planted in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

Guettarda is a splendid genus of the Rubiaceae, nearly allied to Gardenia; it requires a mixture of loam and peat, and a little sand mixed with it. Cuttings strike root pretty freely in sand, under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Guilandina, or Bonduc-tree, thrivesbestin loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Gustavia is a beautiful genus belonging to the Myrtaceae; it thrives well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root pretty freely in sand, under a hand-glass, but they require a strong heat.

Gymnema is a genus of climbing plants, belonging to the Asclepiadeae; they grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Gymnogramma is a genus of Ferns; the Stove species succeed well in peat earth, or perhaps better if a little loam is added to it; they may be stood amongst other plants in a shady situation, or at the back of the Hothouse, and may

be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Gyrocarpus grows best in a sandy loam; large cuttings taken off at a joint, strike freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

H.

Habenaria is a genus of Orchideous plants; the Stove species succeed best in a mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand, and require to be grown in a shady situation, as too much exposure to the sun is very injurious to them; they are only to be obtained from imported plants.

H abranthus is a genus belonging to the Ama-ryllideae, several species of which have been introduced to our gardens within a few years from South America, particularly from Brazil and Buenos Ayres; those from the latter country are hardy, or nearly so, the others require the protection of the Stove or warm Greenhouse; a mixture of loam, peat, and sand, is the best soil for them; and the greater part increase readily by offsets from the root, many also ripen seeds in abundance.

H.emadictyon is a pretty climbing plant, belonging to Apocynese, with handsome red-veined leaves; it succeeds best in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat, root readily.

H/Ematoxylon, or Logwood, grows well in loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in heat.

Hamelia is a pretty, free-flowering genus of the Rubiaceie, and easily managed; it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Hamiltonia is a genus with sweet-scented flowers, belonging to Rubiaceie; they are of free growth, and abundant bloomers, and thrive well in any rich light soil; young cuttings root freely in pots in the same sort of soil, placed in a shady part of the house, or under a hand-glass, on a little heat.

Hardwickia is a leguminous genus, belonging to the tribe of Cassieae; its species grow freely in a mixture of rich loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will strike root.

Haronga belongs to the Hypericineae ; it thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily in pots of sand, under a hand-glass, in a little heat.

Harrisonia of Hooker is a climbing genus of Asclepiadeae, with dark red flowers, very similar to the trumpet Honeysuckle ; it grows readily in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, soon strike root. There was previously a Cryp-togamous genus named Harrisonia, so that the present will require a new name.

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Havetia belongs to the Guttiferae ; it thrives well in a mixture of rich loam and a little peat; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in a pot of sand.

Hedychium is a beautiful genus of the Scitami-neae ; its species grow freely in a light rich soil, and require large pots to make them flower freely ; numerous species are now in the collections, and many of them have produced their beautiful flowers; some of the species grow too strong and tall for small houses; but the dwarfer species are very desirable, particularly those that flower freely ; they are readily increased by dividing at the root.

Hedysarum is a pretty Papilionaceous genus, and some of its species are particularly handsome ; they thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat, and young cuttings will root in sand under a bell-glass. H. gyrans, (now Desmodium gyrans,) or Moving Plant, is an interesting species, having a spontaneous motion in the foliage ; it has a ternate leaf, the side leaflets much smaller than the terminal one; they are frequently moving up and down, either steadily or by jerks, particularly when the house is shut up very warm. The species frequently produce ripe seeds.

Heliconia is a curious genus, belonging to the Musacese : it thrives best in a rich loamy soil, mixed with sand, and requires plenty of room and strong heat to flower in perfection. The plants are increased by dividing them at the root.

Helicteres, or Screw-tree, thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; the plants flower freely, and are readily increased by cuttings, which should be taken off at a joint, and plunged under a hand-glass, in a pot of sand or mould.

IIeliocarpus is a genus belonging to the Tili-aceae, and thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings will root in sand, under a handglass.

Hemidesmus is a genus of the Asclepiadeae, which thrives well in a light rich soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in a pot of sand, on a little heat.

Hemionitis is a genus of the Ferns ; its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and are increased by dividing them at the root, or by seed.

Hemitelia is an arborescent genus of Ferns; it thrives well in sandy loam, in a shady situation.

Heritiera, or Looking-glass Plant, thrives well in a sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat. Large ripened cuttings root readily in a pot of sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Hernandia grows freely in sandy loam, or loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, not deprived of their leaves, will root readily under a hand-glass, in sand.    .

Herpestis is a herbaceous genus, belonging to

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the Scrophularin®; it thrives well in a rich light soil, and strikes root freely from cuttings.

Herkeria is a climbing genus belonging to As-phodeleae; it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and is increased by dividing at the root.

Hej i'eropteris belongs to the Malpighiaceae, and some of the species are handsome plants; they will grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Heterotaxis is anOrchideous genus, and thrives well in peat soil, growing very freely in a hotbed frame or pit in summer, and may be increased by dividing at the root.

Heterotrichum belongs to Melastomaceae, and thrives well in peat soil, mixed with a little sandy loam; young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a little bottom heat, soon strike root.

Heylandia is a Papilionaceous genus, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in a little bottom heat, will strike root readily.

Heynea is a genus belonging to the Meliaceae, which thrives well in loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, not divested of their leaves, will soon strike root in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Hibiscus, as it at present stands, contains a great number of species; most of them are handsome, and flower freely: they thrive well in a rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them very well. Several species ripen plenty of seeds; and cuttings of them strike root readily, in sand or mould, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Hillia is a genus belonging to the Rubiacese, and likes a mixture of sandy loam and peat. Cuttings soon strike root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Hippocratea, Salacia, &c. belong to the order Hippocrateacea: the species grow well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root under a hand-glass, in sand.

Hippomane, or Manchineel-tree, is a very poisonous plant; and great care should be taken in cutting it, not to let the juice, with which it abounds, get about the hands, or it will make them swell and itch very much, as we have found by experience. It grows freely in a sandy loam mixed with peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Hiptage madablota of Decandolle, is the same as Gcertnera racemosa, which see.

Hir.ea belongs to Malpighiaceae; its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat, will soon strike root.

Hirtella is a genus belonging to the Chrysoba-laneae, and likes a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

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Hoffmanseggia prefers a soil of loam and peat. Cuttings not too ripe, will root, under a handglass, in sand.

Holigarna belongs to Cassuvieae; it succeeds well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in sand, placed under a hand-glass, in a little moist heat.

Holmskioldia is a beautiful genus, named Has-tingia, by Sir J. E. Smith, in his Exotic Botany. It thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, or any rich light soil; cuttings will root readily, in a pot of mould, placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

Hosta requires the same treatment as the last genus.

Hoya is a beautiful genus of the Asclepiadeae. H.carnosa is a fine flowering climber, and easily managed, growing freely in a loamy soil or a mixture of loam and peat, requiring very little water in winter ; several species are now in our collections. Cuttings root readily in a moist heat.

Huernia is another genus of the Asclepiadeae, nearly related to Stapelia; but all the species are easily known to belong to the genus, even if they are not in flower. Sandy loam and a mixture of brick and lime rubbish suits them best. If the soil is too rich, they are apt to rot, particularly if they happen to receive rather too much water; very little water is required, except when they are in flower. Cuttings when taken off, should be laid dry till they begin to wither, and then planted, when they will root immediately.

Hugonia is a genus belonging to Chlenaceae ; its species grow freely in light sandy loam, mixed with a little peat; ripened cuttings root readily, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a handglass.

Hura, or Sandbox-tree, grows freely in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat. Large ripened cuttings will root in sand, under a handglass, in heat.

Hydrolea thrives best in loam and peat; and cuttings will root, in sand, under a hand-glass.

Hygrophila belongs to Acanthaceae; it grows freely in a rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will root in a few days.

Hymenaa, or Locust tree, grows freely in loam and peat; and cuttings will strike root in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Hymenocallis is a genus separated from Pancratium, on account of its fleshy seeds; all the species are fine looking plants when grown well, and produce an abundance of fine white sweet-scented flowers; they are in general cultivation, and some of them are to be met with in most collections of Stove plants. A mixture of light turfy loam, with nearly one third fine sand, and a little peat to keep it open, is the best soil to

grow them in; if peat cannot be easily procured, half rotten leaves, or well rotten dung, if free from caterpillars and wireworms, will answer the same purpose. To grow them very fast, it is best to place them in a hotbed frame or pit in summer, and shade them from the mid-day sun, they will then grow to double the size they would in the house. When they are growing freely they require a good supply of water, and as the pots become filled with roots, to be shifted into larger ones ; by that means they will flower two or three times in the season, but care must be taken not to give them much water, when they are not in a growing state. They may be increased by suckers, or from seeds, which in general ripen freely. If any plant chance to lose its heart, if it is kept dry it will throw out an abundance of suckers, which is the readiest way of propagating it.

IIymenodyction belongs to the Cinchoneae tribe of Rubiaceae, and produces bunches of greenish-yellow flowers, of an exquisite fragrance; the species succeed well in a light sandy loam, mixed with a little peat; cuttings scarcely ripened, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in a moist heat, will strike root readily.

Hymenophyllum is an elegant genus of Ferns; the Stove species thrive well in peat soil, and a little loam mixed with it; if loam is not easily procured, half decayed leaves, with rather more

loam mixed with it, will answer the same purpose ; a shady part of the house is best suited for them; and they may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Hyph.ene is a genus of Palms, and thrives best in a sandy loam.

Hypcelytrum is a genus of Grasses, and requires to be grown in a sandy loam, and may be increased by dividing at the root.

Hypoestes is a genus divided from Justicia; its species succeed well in a mixture of loam and rotten dung, or loam and peat will do very well; young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, will root in a few days.

Hyptis grows freely in rich light soil; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in heat.

I.

Ichnocarpus is a genus belonging to the Apo-cyneae, and thrives well in loam and peat. Cuttings will root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Icica belongs to the Burseraceae; its species grow freely in a mixture of light turfy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root readily in a pot of sand, placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

Imbricaria is a genus belonging to Sapote®, growing freely in a good strong heat, in a rich loamy soil; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in a moist bottom heat, will root readily.

Indigofera is a pretty Papilionaceous genus. Loam and peat is a proper soil for it. Cuttings will root readily, taken off in the young wood, and planted under a bell-glass, in sand.

Inga is a beautiful genus of the Mimoseae, thriving best in a mixture of loam and peat; I. purpurea is a fine species, and much admired for the beauty of its flowers. Young cuttings, taken otf at the joint, do best under a bell-glass, in sand, plunged in heat.

Inocarpus, or Otaheite Chestnut, thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Ionopsis is a genus of Orchideae, which grows freely in turfy peat soil, succeeding best in a a hotbed pit or frame in summer; but care must be taken not to overwater it, as it is very liable to rot off; it may be increased, though sparingly, by dividing at the root, but this should be done in spring, just as it is to be removed to the frame, or it will not be so likely to succeed.

Ipomcea is a beautiful genus belonging to the Convolvulacese, whose numerous species are well adapted for trellis-work, or to run up pillars, &c. in the stoves. These are mostly free flowerers, and easily managed. Light rich soil or a mixture of loam and peat, or loam and decayed leaves, suit them well; and young cuttings root freely in sand or mould, under a handglass, in heat.

Isch-emum is a genus of the Grasses, which grows

well in a loamy soil; and is increased by dividing at the root.

Iserti a is a fine Rubiaceous genus, of free growth, if kept in a good heat; but it is very liable to suffer in winter, if the house is allowed to become too cold; it thrives well in a mixture of turfy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist bottom heat, will root in a few days.

Isochilus is a genus belonging to the Orchideae, and some of the species are supposed to be very difficult to manage, but we have found them succeed and flower well, planted in pots of sandy peat earth, and grown in a hotbed frame or pit in summer, and from thence removed to the stove in autumn. The pots must be well drained, as the roots are very apt to suffer from too much moisture, particularly when not growing freely. They are increased by dividing at the root.

Ixora is a beautiful genus : its species require to be kept in a moist heat to thrive well; but not plunged in tan, as that is almost certain to injure their roots. A mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for them. Care must be taken to keep them clean, and free from insects, or they will not thrive. Cuttings root very freely in sand, or mould, under a hand-glass.

J.

Jacaranda is a fine flowering genus, belonging to the Bignoniacese; its species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat, or any light rich earth; requiring to be kept dry in winter, to give them a check, which will make them produce flowers. Cuttings, not too old, will strike root readily, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, without being deprived of their leaves.

Jacquinia is a beautiful genus, and thrives well in loam and peat. Cuttings will strike root with care, in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat; but great care is required in potting them oft", as their roots are small and soon broken.

Jambosa is a genus of tropical fruits, belonging to Myrtaceae; it has been lately separated from Eugenia by M. De Candolle ; to it belongs Eugenia Jambos, malaccensis, purpurea, and several other species; they all thrive well in a rich loamy soil, and a little peat or other light mould mixed with it, to keep it open; ripened cuttings, not too much hardened, taken off at a joint, and planted in pots of sand, without shortening their leaves, will soon strike root, if placed under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Jasminum thrives well in loam and peat; and cuttings root very readily in sand, under a handglass, in heat.

Jatropha thrives well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; some of the species are very hand-

some; but they require small pots, and very little water. Most of them will ripen seeds freely if care be taken to fertilize the stigmas with the pollen when in bloom. Cuttings root best stuck in the tan, in a good heat.

Johnia is an East Indian genus, belonging to Hip-pocrateaceae; its species grow readily in a mixture of rich sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings will soon strike root, in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

Jolifkia is a splendid climbing plant, belonging to Cucurbitaceae; its flowers are very curious and beautiful; but it requires a great space to grow, before it will flower, and to be frequently pruned in, to keep it within bounds; the best way to get them to flower in a young state, is to strike cuttings from flowering shoots; they will readily strike root, planted either in mould or sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat; the best soil to grow it in, is a mixture of sandy loam and a little peat; for if grown in too rich a soil, there will scarcely be a possibility to keep it within bounds : it is cultivated in the Mauritius for its seeds, which are considered excellent food.

Jonesia grows freely in a light loamy soil; and large cuttings root well in sand, under a handglass.

Jonidium is a pretty genus belonging toViolarite; its species grow freely in a mixture of light loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in pots of

sand, placed under a hand-glass, on a little heat.

Jossinia is another genus belonging to Myrtaceae, lately separated from Eugenia, and requires precisely the same sort of treatment as Jambosa.

JussijEA is a genus belonging to the Onagrariae. Most of the species are aquatic plants, and grow best in a tub or pot of water. Cuttings root very freely.

Justicia is a pretty genus belonging to the Acan-thaceae; most of the species are free flowerers, and easily managed, thriving well in loam and peat. Cuttings strike root freely under a handglass, in heat.

K.

Kacmpferia is a curious genus belonging to the Scitamineae; it grows freely in rich light soil, or a mixture of loam, peat, and sand ; requiring but little water when the plants are not in a growing state, and they will flower readily. They are increased by dividing at the root.

Kirganelia belongs to the Euphorbiaceae; it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root readily in a pot of sand, under a hand-glass, on a moist bottom heat.

Kleinhofia grows best in a light loamy soil; and cuttings are not difficult to root, under a handglass, in sand.

Kydia is an East Indian genus belonging to Butt-

STOVE PLANTS.

i

neriacese; its species succeed well in a mixture of light turfy loam and peat; and cuttings not too ripe, will soon strike root, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on bottom heat.

L.

Labla b is a Papilionaceous genus, separated from Dolichos; they are climbing plants, and their flowers are very pretty; they also flower while in a young state, thriving well in any rich light soil, and may be increased by seeds, which ripen freely.

L^etia is a West Indian genus belonging to Bix-inete; it grows freely in a rich light soil; and cuttings not too ripe, root readily in pots of sand, under a hand-glass, on heat.

Lagerstrcemi a is a splendid genus belonging to the Salicariae. L. indica is a hardy Stove plant, easily cultivated, and flowers abundantly: it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat. L. Regina, and L.grandijlora, are more tender, and rather difficult to preserve through the winter; they require a good heat, and but little water in winter; if they happen to have too much wet it is a great chance if they survive; in summer they grow very fast, and require plenty of room and water. Cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Lagetta grows well in a mixture of loam and

peat; and ripened cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Laguncularia belongs to the Combretaceae; it succeeds well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

La nt an a is a free flowering genus, of easy culture ; and thrives well in loam and peat. Cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in sand or mould.

Lasiandra is a handsome genus belonging to Melastomaceae; its species grow freely in a mixture of one third loam, and the rest sandy peat; and young cuttings strike root freely in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Latania is a genus of the Palms, which thrives best in a sandy loam and strong moist heat.

Laurus is a genus, or rather a tribe of plants which contains species very different in habit, and requiring very different cultivation. L. Cin-namomum is considered the hardest to cultivate; but since cultivators have taken to grow their plants more by top heat, and by that means have nearly done away with the use of tan, the Cinnamon has taken to flourish as well as any other plant, for it was generally the moisture of the tan that injured its fleshy roots, and caused the leaves to drop or decay ; the house in which it is kept, should never be suffered to get below 60 degrees of Fahrenheit’s thermometer, in winter, and if kept up to 70 it will thrive all the

better. It grows best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, the pots being well drained with small potsherds: ripened cuttings soon take root in a pot of sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in a good moist heat. L. Cassia, and some other nearly related species, grow more readily than the Cinnamon; the same kind of soil suits them ; and cuttings root freely treated in the same manner ; all the other Stove species thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and the greater part of them will strike root freely from ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Lawsonia thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Lebretonia is a genus belonging to Malvaceae; the best soil for it is a mixture of rich loam and peat; and cuttings not too ripe will soon strike root in a pot of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Lecythis belongs to a suborder of Myrtaceae ; its species succeed best in a rich loamy soil, mixed with a little peat; and ripened cuttings will root readily, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat; but they must not have their leaves shortened.

Lee a grows freely in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings soon strike root under a hand-glass, in heat.

Lepidagathis is a genus related to Jnsticia; it

1 2

thrives well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, will root in a few days.

Lestibudksia is a genus belonging to the Ama-ranthaceae. It thrives well in a light rich soil, and is readily increased both by seeds and cuttings.

Lettsomia belongs to the Ternstroemiaceae; the best soil for it is a rich loam, mixed with a little peat; and young cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will root freely: this genus must not be confused with Lettsomia of the Flora Indica, which is Argyraea of Loureiro.

Lieu ala is a beautiful genus of the Palms, which succeeds best in a sandy loam, and strong moist heat.

Limnociiaris is a handsome genus of water plants, belonging to Butomeae; they require to be grown in a tub or cistern of water, in a warm part of the stove ; and as they are scarcely more than biennial, care should be taken to preserve the seed, or it will be in danger of being lost.

Limonia is a genus belonging to the Aurantiaceas or Orange tribe; its species like a mixture of loam and peat, with the addition of a very little rotten dung. Ripened cuttings will strike root in sand, under a hand-glass, plunged in a moist heat.

Linds.ea is a genus of handsome Ferns, which

will thrive well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root; or by seeds, which must be sown on a pot of earth and watered, and then covered with moss till they make their appearance, when they must be hardened to the air by degrees.

Linocieka is a genus of the Oleinae, allied to Chionanthus; it grows freely in loam and peat; and cuttings will root under a hand-glass, in sand.

Liparis is a genus of Orchideae, the Stove species of which thrive best in a turfy peat soil, thriving best in a hotbed frame or pit in summer, and may be occasionally divided by offsets from the roots.

Lisianthus belongs ,to the natural order of the Gentianeae, and some of the species are very handsome flowering plants; they succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, uuder a bell-glass.

Lissochilus is a handsome Cape genus of Orchi-deae, thriving best in a turfy peat soil, mixed with some sandy loam; it is a very fine genus, but does not increase readily; the only method is by dividing at the root.

Litt.ea is a genus of Bromeliaceae nearly allied to Agave, and was for a length of time considered as Buonaparteajuncea, but that now proves to be incorrect; it makes a handsome plant, its leaves spreading out in an elegant manner; it i 3

thrives well in a sandy loam, and is increased by the suckers from the root.

Livistona is a fine genus of Palms, requiring to be grown in a sandy loam, and strong heat.

Lobelia is rather a tribe than a genus : the Stove species thrive well in a light rich soil; and cuttings root freely stuck in the tan, or planted in a pot of mould, and not covered with glass.

Lomaria is a genus of Ferns; the Stove species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds managed in the way recommended under Lindsaea.

Lonchitis is another genus of Ferns, growing freely in loam and peat; and is increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Lo ng c h oc a u p u s is a Papilionaceous genus,chiefly natives of the West Indian Islands and South America; they all thrive well in a sandy loam, mixed with a little peat; and the greater part may be struck readily from cuttings, taken off at a joint, the wood not too ripe ; these must be planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a bottom heat.

Lopm ba is a Sierra Leone genus, which will grow readily in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Lopimia belongs to the Malvaceae, and succeeds well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, taken off at a joint, and planted in pots of

sand, placed under a hand-glass, in heat, will root in a few days ; it may also be raised from seeds, which ripen in abundance.

Loreya is a genus of Melastomaceae, which grows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; the cuttings are not so easily struck as the generality of Melastomaceae, and will sometimes remain some time before they root; young cuttings strike the most readily, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Lourea is a Papilionaceous genus; its species are biennial, and must therefore be raised from seeds ; a mixture of sandy loam and peat is the most proper soil for them ; and the seeds, if sown in August, will flower the next summer.

Lucuma belongs to Sapoteas, and is a genus of fruit-bearing trees ; they grow well in a mixture of rich loam, and a little peat or other light soil to keep it open; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, root without difficulty.

Ludia is a genus from the Mauritius, belonging to Bixineae ; its species succeed well in a mixture of rich loam and a little peat; and cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Luhea is a pretty genus belonging to Tiliaceae; it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings may be rooted readily, taken off in nearly ripened wood, and planted in pots of i 4

sand, which must be placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Lygodium, or Snake’s-tongue, is a climbing genus of the Ferns: it grows freely in loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seed.

/

M.

Maba (Ferreola, Roxb.) is a genus belonging to the Ebenaceae. It thrives well in loam and peat; and ripened cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

MACRADENiAtis a genus of the parasitical Orchi-deae; it thrives well in turfy peat soil, and best in a hotbed frame or pit in summer, and to be moved in the Stove in winter; the only way of increasing it is by dividing at the root.

Macrocnemum belongs to the Rubiacese, and thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings will root under a hand-glass, in sand.

M.esa, or Bceobotrys, thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Mahurea is a genus belonging to Guttiferse, and grows by the sides of marshes in Guiana and Trinidad; it therefore requires a good supply of water; a loamy soil suits it best; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in a moist heat, will strike root without difficulty.

Maieta is a genus of Melastomaceae; it grows freely in peat soil, and a little loam mixed with it; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat, will root readily.

Malachiia belongs to the Malvaceae; the species are soft-wooded plants, and grow freely in any rich light soil; they may be increased by cuttings, placed under a hand-glass, or by seeds.

Malpighia grows freely in light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat: the leaves of some of the species, viz. M. urcns and M. fucata, have their under-side covered with a kind of prickly bristles, which being touched will run into the fingers. Ripened cuttings are not difficult to root, under a hand-glass, in sand.

M alva visc us is a genus of pretty scarlet flowers, belonging to Malvaceae; they will succeed well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will root in a few days.

Mammea americana and africana are fine-looking plants, with leaves resembling those of Magnolia grandijlora. They are cultivated as fruit-trees in tropical climates, and much esteemed. They grow freely in sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, with the leaves not shortened, are not difficult to root, in a pot of sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in heat.

M a mm ill aria is a genus of short* somewhat

globular, prickly plants, belonging to Cacteae; there are now a great many species of them introduced to our collections, many of which produce very pretty little flowers; the best soil for them is a mixture of old lime and brick rubbish, mixed with very sandy loam ; and in winter they require very little water, but when growing freely they require a good supply; many of them may be increased from the little suckers by their sides; seeds are also occasionally ripened.

Manettia is a genus of climbing plants belonging to Rubiaceae ; their flowers are very pretty, red or scarlet; they thrive well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings root in a few days, under a hand-glass, in sand.

Mangifera indica, or Mango, is a fruit-tree, in general cultivation in tropical climates: it sometimes ripens fruit in this country, when the plants are of a good size. Sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat, is most suitable to it, and the pots should be well drained, as the plants are very apt to get sodden with too much water. Fresh seeds from the West Indies vegetate freely. The plant may also be increased from cuttings, which root best in sand, under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Manicaria is a genus of Palms, requiring a rich sandy loam, and to be grown in a strong heat.

M antisia is a genus belonging to Scitamineas; the best soil is a mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand ; and it is increased from dividing at the root.

Mappa belongs to the Euphorbiaceae; it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, placed under a hand-glass, planted in sand, soon strike root.

Maranta is a genus belonging to the Canneae. Its species thrive well in a light rich soil, and are readily increased by dividing them at the root.

Marattia is a genus of the Ferns, which grows well in loam and peat; and is increased by dividing at the root.

Marcgravia thrives best in a light loamy soil. Cuttings should be planted in sand, under a hand-glass.

MauialVa belongs to the Guttiferae ; it succeeds best in rich loam, mixed with a little peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, and placed on a moist heat, under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Marica is a fine genus belonging to the Irideae, some fine species of which have been lately introduced to our collections. The finest are M. ccerulea and M. Sabini. The latter discovered in Africa by Mr. George Don. They all thrive well in a mixture of loam, peat, and sand, the same as recommended for Amaryllis. They are readily increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds, which will ripen in abundance, if the stigmas are fertilized by the pollen when in bloom ; those should be sown as soon as ripe, and they will soon vegetate.

Marila belongs to Guttiferae, and requires the same sort of treatment as Marialva.

Mari sc us is a genus belonging to the Cyperaceae, which grows best in a loamy soil, and should be well supplied with water. May be increased by dividing at the roots.

Marlea is an East Indian genus related to Myr<-taceae; a mixture of sandy loam and peat is a proper soil for it; and ripened cuttings are not difficult to root, planted in pots of sand, and placed on heat, under a hand-glass.

Matayba belongs to Sapindaceae, and grows freely in a mixture of light sandy loam and peat; young cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, soon strike root.

Mauritia is a genus of Palms, requiring a rich sandy loam, and a good strong heat, and plenty of water when growing freely.

Maxillaria is a parasitical genus of Orchideas, requiring the same treatment as Epidendrum, Oncidium, and others of the same tribe.

Maximiliana is a genus of Palms, and requires the same sort of treatment as Mauritia and the other Palms.

Megaclinium is a genus of Orchideae, and requires the treatment of Epidendrum and other parasitical Orchideous plants.

Melaleuca Leucadendron, or Caju Puti Tree, thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in sand, under a bell-glass, in heat.

Melanorrhcea is a beautiful genus belonging to Cassuvieae ; it thrives best in a light loamy soil,

mixed with a little peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat, will not be difficult to root.

Melastoma is a beautiful genus, of which many species are now in our collections. They thrive best in peat soil, and require but little water in winter. Young cuttings root very readily under a hand-glass, planted in pots of peat, and plunged in a moist heat.

Melhania is a pretty genus belonging to the Buttneriacese. It grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; but is very liable to be covered with insects, which should be cleaned off, or the plants will not thrive. Cuttings will root best in the same sort of mould, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Melia grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and large cuttings will root under a handglass, in sand; seeds also ripen.

Melicocca thrives best in a light loamy soil; and cuttings will strike root in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Melocactus, or Melon Thistle, is a genus of the Cacteae; its species are crowned with a head of a cottony substance, intermixed with numerous slender, red prickles; the flowers are produced out of this head, and are generally of a red or pinky colour; those will perfect seeds, if a little pains be taken to fertilize the stigma with the pollen, when in flower ; the best soil for the different species is old mortar or lime rubbish from

old buildings, mixed with a little sandy loam; and the pots in which they are grown, must be well drained with broken potsherds, that the wet may pass off readily, as they are very apt to rot, if kept too moist

Me loch i a is a genus belonging to Buttneriacece: it thrives well in light rich soil; and young cuttings root readily, plunged under a hand-glass, in heat.

Melodinus is a genus belonging to the Apocy-nese. It grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Memecylon is removed from Melastomaceae by M. De Candolle, and, with some other genera, erected into a separate order by the name of Memecyleae; a mixture of sandy loam and peat suits its species best; and young cuttings, planted in sand, and plunged under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Meniscium is a genus of the Ferns, which will thrive in loam and peat, and is increased by dividing at the root.

Meoschium is a genus of Grasses, natives of the East Indies, and therefore require the protection of the Stove; sandy loam is the best soil for them; and they may be increased by dividing at the root.

Meriania is a beautiful genus of Melastomacese; its species are known in the West Indies by the name of Mountain Rose: they thrive best in

peat soil, mixed with a little loam; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Mertensia is a genus related to Celtis, and belongs to the Urticeae; its species are scarcely worth cultivating, except in a Botanic Garden, or where a general collection of plants are kept up: they grow freely in a rich loamy soil, mixed with a little peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, placed under a hand-glass, in a little heat.

Mbsserchmidi a belongs to the Boragineae ; the species at present arranged under it, were originally arranged under Tournefortia : the flowers are generally of a greenish white colour, and are scarcely worth cultivating, except in a general collection; a mixture of loam and peat suits them well; and young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses in the same sort of soil, will soon strike root.

Metastelma is a climbing genus belonging to Asclepiadeae; it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily in a pot of sand, under a hand-glass, on heat.

Metrosideros vera is a fine Stove plant, with large glossy foliage, and pretty greenish yellow flowers; it is of handsome growth, and its appearance resembles that of Jambosa; a mixture of sandy loam, with one third peat, is the most proper soil for it; and ripened cuttings are not difficult to root, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat. This plant

is a true species of Metrosideros, and it is doubtful whether any of the New Holland species that have been placed under the same genus, do really belong to it; we believe the greater part of them will arrange with Callistemon and An-gophora.

Meyera belongs to the Composite; it succeeds well in any rich light soil, and may be increased by seeds.

Michf.lia is a fine genus belonging to the Mag-noliaceae ; it succeeds well in a mixture of loam and peat, and ripened cuttings do best, plunged under a hand-glass, in sand; it also takes well, and grows freely, inarched on the common purple Magnolia, which is the readiest way of propagating it.

Miconia is a pretty genus belonging to Melasto-maceae ; in general very handsome formed plants with fine foliage, some of them producing white, and others lilac or rose-coloured flowers; they all grow freely in a sandy peat soil, mixed with about one third loam: young cuttings of the greater part of them root readily, others are a considerable time in making roots; they must be planted in pots of sand, or peat, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Micranthera belongs to the Guttiferae, and is related to Garcinia; the best soil for it is a mixture of rich turfy loam, with about one-third peat; ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, root readily under a hand-glass, on heat.

Microlicia is a pretty genus belonging to Me-lastomaceae, some species of which are annual, and others suffrutescent; they succeed well in peat soil, mixed with a little sandy loam ; and young cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in heat.

Mi ran i a is a genus belonging to the Composite ; it grows freely in rich light soil, and cuttings strike root readily.

Millingtonia belongs to the Bignoniaceae, and is the Bignonia subcrosa of Roxburgh ; but Mr. Brown has shown in his Prodromus, that it is a genus distinct from Bignonia; it must therefore be re-established : it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings not too ripe, nor their leaves shortened, will root readily, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat,

Mimosa, as it is now limited, consists chiefly of plants whose leaves are sensitive, and shut up as soon as touched; it is readily distinguished from Acacia by its jointed seedpod : the species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings may be rooted, if planted young, in a pot of sand, under a bell-glass. Some sorts ripen seed in abundance.

Mimusops grows freely in a light loamy soil, or loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Modecca is a curious genus belonging to the Passifloreee; it grows best in a mixture of loam

K

and peat; and young cuttings root freely in sand or mould, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Mogiphanes is a pretty genus belonging to Ama-ranthaceae; its species thrive well in any rich light soil; and they may be increased by seeds, or young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, will root readily, placed under a hand-glass, on a little heat.

Moneti a barlerioides, the Azima tetracantha of Lamarck, is a very thorny plant: it grows well in loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand under a hand-glass, in heat.

Monodora, the Jamaica Nutmeg, belongs to Ano-naceae; it thrives well in two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third peat; and ripened cuttings, not too much hardened, are not difficult to root, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under a handglass, on heat.

Morinda is a genus belonging to the Rubiaceae: it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Moringa is a genus belonging to Leguminosae, of the sub-order Cassiece; its species succeed well in two-thirds sandy loam, and the rest peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat, will strike root.

Morisonia belongs to the Capparideae ; it thrives well in a mixture of two-thirds loam, and one of peat; and ripened cuttings root without difficulty, in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Moronobea is a genus belonging to the Gutti-ferae; it thrives well in a sandy loam, mixed with a little peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will strike root readily.

Mouriria belongs to the Memecyleae; its species thrive well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of

• sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Mucuna is a genus of handsome climbing plants belonging to Papilionaceae; the greater part of them require to grow a great length before they produce their flowers; this may be partly remedied by striking cuttings from shoots that have flowered; as they are already in a flowering state, their flowers will be produced much more readily than from those raised from seed. Seeds of many of them are often imported under the name of Bull’s-eyes, Beads, and other names; they will grow freely in any rich light soil, and young cuttings, planted in sand, under a handglass, will root readily.

Mullera belongs to the Papilionaceae; it grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and young cuttings will strike root, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Muntingia thrives well in a light loamy soil; and cuttings are not difficult to strike, planted in sand, and plunged under a hand-glass. k 2

Murray a is a pretty genus, with orange-scented white flowers; it belongs to Aurantiacese: an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat is a proper soil for the different species; and ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, and planted in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Murucuia is a beautiful climbing genus belonging to Passiflorae. M. ccellata is one of the most desirable climbers for a Stove or Hothouse, as it grows freely, and produces an innumerable quantity of its handsome crimson flowers; it thrives in any rich light soil, and young cuttings planted in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will root in a few days.

Musa is the genus to which the Banana or Plantain-tree belongs: it requires a great deal of room to grow to perfection, which it never does except in a lofty house, where it will produce both flowers and fruit. Several species are now in our collections, some of which are much esteemed for the sake of their large leaves, as well as their flowers. A rich loamy soil suits them best, and they are readily increased by suckers.

Mussacnda is a pretty genus belonging to the Rubiacese : it will thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat, and cuttings root freely, planted in mould, under a hand-glass.

Myginda delights in a loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.    .

Mvrcia belongs to the Myrtaceae, and is a genus nearly related to Myrtus; its species succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings not too ripe, root freely in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on a little moist heat. Mveistica, or Nutmeg-tree, is a very rare plant in the collections at present. A light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat, is the most proper soil for it; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist bottom heat, would doubtless root readily; but as the plant is at present so rare, we have not heard that there has as yet been any trial made; if once struck from cuttings, the plants would be more likely to thrive and make good plants, than those that are imported. Myhodia is a genus belonging to the Bombacea?.

A light rich soil suits it best; and cuttings root . readily in sand, under a hand-glass. Myrospermum is a Papilionaceous genus belonging to the tribe Sophoreae; it thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will strike root. Myroxylon is nearly related to the last genus, and requires precisely the same sort of treatment. Myrtus belongs to Myrtaceae. All the species grow best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat. M. tomentoaa, a beautiful species, strikes root freely from cuttings, not too ripe, planted in sand, under a bell-glass. Cuttings of most species may be struck in the same manner.

N.

Nageia is a genus belonging to Myriceae; it succeeds well in two thirds peat, and one third loam; and cuttings root freely in pots of sand, under a hand-glass.

Naravelia (Atragene zeylanica) is a climbing genus belonging to the Ranunculaceae. Atragene zeylanica of Roxburgh is probably another species ? The plants like a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted thinly in a pot of sand, will strike root, under a hand-glass.

Nauciea thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will strike root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Nelitris belongs to the Myrtaceae; it grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings not too ripe, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will root readily.

Nelsonia belongs to the Acanthaceae ; its species succeed well in any light rich soil, and are readily increased by cuttings.

Nelumbiuai is a beautiful aquatic genus, belonging to the Nymphaeaceae. It should be grown in a tub or large pot, in a rich loamy soil, and requires a strong heat to flower in perfection. The pot or tub should be kept full of water all the time the plants are growing, but may be allowed to get dry when the flowering season is over. The plants may be increased by dividing

at the root, but it is obtained more readily from seeds, which vegetate freely.

Neottia is a pretty genus belonging to the Or-chideae, which thrives best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and requires but little water, except when growing freely. Most of the tuberous, or fleshy-rooted Orchideae, require the same kind of treatment as the present genus; such as Bletia, Calanthe, Prescotia, &c. They all succeed best in a hotbed frame or pit in summer, and to be removed to the hot-house in the winter. The plants are increased by dividing at the root.

Nepenthes, or Pitcher-plant, is an aquatic or rather marsh-plant; it succeeds best in turfy peat soil, and the pots to be stood in a pan of water, but not to be immersed. A hotbed frame or pit suits them well in summer, but they must be removed to the hot-house in winter, and the house will require to be kept up to a good heat.

Nephelium requires a light, rich, loamy soil; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Nephrodium is a genus of the Ferns, readily distinguished from all the other co-ordinates by its kidney-shaped involucre. All the species thrive well in loam and peat, and are increased by dividing at the root, or by seed.

Nerium is a fine genus belonging to the Apocy-nese, which thrives best in a light rich soil, composed of half loam, one fourth peat, and a fourth of rotten dung. N. odorim and its several varik 4    .

eties thrive best in the stove in winter, but in summer will do well in the open air. N. odorum /3 fiore pleno of Botanical Register and Botanical Magazine (N. splendens of gardeners), I have no doubt is a hybrid plant raised from the seed of N. odorum Jlore pleno. The habit of the plant is strictly that of N. Oleander, and it is quite as hardy. The multipartite crown of the flower approaches near to N. odorum, but is not divided so deep as in that species, which is also much more tender. Cuttings of all the kinds strike root readily in sand or mould, plunged under a hand-glass, in a good moist heat.

Nes^ea is a genus belonging to Lythrarieae; it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will root in a few days.

Neurocarpum is a Papilionaceous genus; its species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and they may be increased by seeds, or young cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will root without difficulty.

Neurolcena is one of the genera that has been confounded with Calea. Calea lobata is the species that belongs to it. It will thrive well in any rich light soil, and cuttings root freely in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Nicolsonia grows freely in loam and peat; and may be incressed by seeds, or young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will root.

Niebuhria belongs to the Capparideae; its species grow freely in a mixture of turfy loam and peat; and cuttings not too ripe, will root freely in pots of sand,placed under a hand-glass,on heat.

Nipa is a genus of Palms, requiring a strong loamy soil, and to be grown in a strong moist heat.

Nissolia is a Papilionaceous genus: it thrives best in a sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings might be rooted, under a hand-glass, in sand.

Nonatelia is a genus belonging to Rubiace®, related to Psychotria; its species thrive well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings soon strike root, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Norantea is a genus belonging to Marcgravia-ce®; its species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, taken at a joint, and planted in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, will root readily.

INotholvEna is a genus of Ferns; and the Stove species succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat, and may be placed in any shady part of the house; they may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seed.

Notylia is a parasitical Orchideous genus, thriving well in turfy peat soil, and if possible to be kept in a hotbed frame or pit in summer, to be removed to the Stove in autumn; the only way of increasing it is by dividing at the root.

Nyctaxthes belongs to the Jasmine®. It grows

freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and now produces its very fragrant flowers as freely as any other plant; at one time it was considered as a very difficult plant to make flower; but since the general disuse of tan for growing plants, it has been treated more hardily than formerly, which was what it wanted, as we hinted in our first edition. Perhaps it is still hardier than is imagined; from its general appearance, we should judge it to be a hardy plant, or one that requires but little protection. Cuttings, not too ripe, strike root readily in sand,under a hand-glass.

Nycterisition belongs to the Sapotese ; it succeeds best in two thirds light turfy loam, and one third peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, and placed on heat, under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Nycterium is a genus belonging to Solaneae; the Stove species succeed well in any rich light sandy soil. The N. Amasonium is a very fine species, bearing large dark blue flowers, and ought to be in every collection of Stove plants. Cuttings a little hardened, taken off at a joint, and placed under a hand-glass, in a pot of sand, on a little heat, will root readily.

NymphjEa is an aquatic genus, and several handsome species are now in our collections, but not so many as there were some years back; we fear that some of the very tenderest of them have now disappeared. They may be grown in large pots or pans of water, in a warm part of

the stove, in a rich loamy soil, and we have seen them thrive well in a frame, placed on a hotbed, where the different species have flowered abundantly. They are increased by dividing the root, or by seed.

O.

Obesia is a genus of the Stapeliae, requiring the same treatment as Stapelia and Huernia.

Ochna is a pretty genus, and several species are now in our collections. They grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Ocrroiia is a genus belonging to the Bombaceae, growing freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand under a hand-glass.

Ochrosia is a genus belonging to Apocineae, thriving well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily in pots of sand or mould, placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Octomeria is a genus of the Orchideae, and thrives best in pots of light sandy peat, to be grown in hotbed frames or pits in summer, and in winter to be removed to the stove, the same as other genera to which it is allied. It is increased by dividing at the root.

(Enocarpus isagenus of Palms, requiring a good rich sandy loam, and a good heat to grow in.

Olax is a climbing genus belonging to Olacineai; its species thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam

and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will root freely.

Oldenlandia isagenus ofRubiaceae; its species require a light rich soil, and cuttings strike root readily.

Olisbea is a West Indian genus, related to Rhi-zophoreae ; it succeeds well in a mixture of loam and peat, and requires a considerable quantity of water. Cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, on a good moist heat, will soon strike root.

Olyra is a genus belonging to Gramineas, or Grass tribe, and thrives well in a loamy soil. It is increased by dividing it at the root.

Omphalea grows freely in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat; but care must be taken not to injure the leaves, or they will not succeed.

Omphalobium belongs to the Connaraceae; its species grow freely in a light sandy loam, mixed with about one third peat; ripened cuttings soon strike root, in a pot of sand, under a handglass, on a little moist heat.

Oncidium is a pretty genus of the Orchideae, and some of its species are amongst the most stately of the tribe. Most of them will grow freely fixed up to a tree in moss, with the outer shells of Cocoa-nuts nailed round it, as already recommended for others of this order. All the species

succeed well in pots of turfy peat well filled with broken potsherds, of which the roots are very fond of taking hold. They also succeed much the best and grow much stronger in hotbed . frames or pits in summer, but care must be taken not to over-water them, or to let any water get into their hearts, or they are very apt to rot. They are readily increased by dividing at the root. Ophiorhiza, or Snakeroot, belongs to the Rubia-cese; its species grow freely in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat, and are increased by seeds, or cuttings from the young shoots will strike root, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in a little moist heat.

Ophioxylonscvpctithiiimgrows freely inamixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will strike root in sand, under a hand-glass.

OpuNTiA,or the Indian Fig tribe, belongs toCac-teae ; some of its species are hardy, others require the Greenhouse, and many succeed best in a dry Stove; the best soil to grow them in, is a mixture of old lime and brick rubbish from old walls, mixed with some sandy loam ; they require but little water in winter, and to be exposed to the open air in summer, to give them a check, which generally throws them into flower ; cuttings, taken off at the joints, and laid to dry for a few days before planting,will soon strike root. Orbea is a genus of the Stapelieae, and requires the same treatment as Huernia and Stapelia:

the genus is readily distinguished from the others of the same tribe by the orb or crown on its surface.

Ormocarpum is a Papilionaceous genus allied to Hedysarum; it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and may be increased by seeds, or young cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will root readily.

Ormosia is a Papilionaceous genus, which thrives well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat. Seeds from the West Indies generally vegetate freely; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Ornithidium is a curious genus of the parasitical Orchideae, which thrives well on a tree, fixed up in Cocoa-nut shells in moss. It also thrives well in turfy peat that is very sandy and open, but it requires very little water, and the pots must be well drained, as too much moisture is very injurious to it. Like its nearest relatives, it thrives best in a hotbed frame or pit in summer, and is propagated by dividing at the joints.

Ornithocephalus is another of the parasitical Orchideae; very diminutive plants; they require the same kind of treatment as the last genus.

Orthosiphon is a genus related to Ocymum; its species grow freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings root readily in a shady situation, in the same sort of soil, either with or without a glass.

Osbeckia is a genus belonging to the Melastoma-

ceae, and thrives best in peat soil mixed with one third sandy loam. Young cuttings strike freely under a hand-glass in the same sort of soil, in heat.

Oss^e a is a genus also belonging to Melastomaceae, and requires precisely the same sort of treatment as Osbeckia.

Outea is a Leguminous genus belonging to the tribe of Cassieas; its species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root freely, planted in pots, and placed under a hand-glass, on a little moist heat.

Oxyanthus is a genus belonging to the Rubiaceae, and nearly allied to Gardenia; it thrives well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and cuttings are not difficult to root, in sand, under a hand-glass; according to De Candolle three species have been confused together.

Oxybaphus belongs to the natural order of Nyc-tagineae ; it is named Calhymenia in Persooris Synopsis It thrives best in a rich light soil, or it will grow very well in a mixture of loam and peat. Many of the species succeed best by being planted out in the borders in summer, and the roots to be taken up and laid by, out of the reach of frost in winter, in the same manner as the Marvel of Peru, or the Georgina genus. Cuttings will root readily, under a hand-glass, in spring.

Oxyspora belongs to the Melastomaceae ; itgrows freely in a mixture of two thirds peat, and one third sandy loam; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, or in sand, and placed

under a hand-glass, on a little heat, will soon strike root.

Oxystelma belongs to the Asclepiadeae: it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

P.

PACHYRRHizusisa Papilionaceous genus of climbing plants related to Dolichus; they succeed well in any rich light soil, and may be raised from seeds, or young cuttings, planted in a pot, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will root in two or three days.

P-ederi a is a climbing genus of plants belonging to the Rubiaceae. The P. fcetida is a very fastgrowing plant, and thrives well in loam and peat. The coldest part of the stove suits it best, as it will live through the winter in a green-house, but does not thrive. Cuttings strike root readily.

Pan ax belongs to the Araliaceae ; it thrives well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike root readily in sand, under a hand-glass. ‘

Pancratium, as now limited by Mr. Herbert, consists chiefly of the hardier species with black testaceous seeds; the East Indian species probably also belong to it; but we do not know that their seeds have yet been seen in this country; the best soil to grow them in, is two thirds sandy loam, and the other third sand and peat: the

only way of increasing them is by offsets from the root.

P a nd a nus, or Screw Pine, is a stately, fine-looking genus ; its species thrive well in a light loamy soil, and some of them produce suckers, by which they may be increased, but we have not heard ofany of the species ever flowering in this country.

Panicum is a genus of Grasses; the Stove species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and are increased by dividing them at the root, or by seed.

Papyrus, or Paper-Rush, is a magnificent genus, and requires to be grown in a tub, or large pot of water, with mud at the bottom, for their roots ; they may be increased by seeds, or dividing at the root.

Parietari a indicator IndianPellitory, thrives well in a light rich soil; and cuttings strike root freely.

Parinarium belongs to Chrysobalanere ; the Sierra Leone species are cultivated for their fruit, under the names of Rough Plum* and Gingerbread Plum; they grow freely in two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a handglass, in heat, will strike root readily.

Pa ri vo a is a Leguminous genus, belonging to the tribe of Cassieae ; it grows freely in a mixture of two-thirds sandy-loam, and a third peat soil; and cuttings not too ripe, nor deprived of any of their leaves, will strike root in sand, under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

L

Parkeria is a genus of Ferns, and grows best in a mixture of turfy loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Parkia is a handsome genus, belonging to Mimo-sese ; it grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat, will strike root.

Parkinsonia is a beautiful genus belonging to the Papilionace®, but seldom suffered to grow large enough to flower in our stoves. It grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a bell-glass ; seeds of it are also imported, which vegetate freely.

Passiflora, or Passion Flower. Of this curious and beautiful family there are now a great number of species in our collections; which are well suited for climbers, being free growers, and easily managed. They thrive best in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and the more room they have allowed them, the better they grow and flower. Most of the kinds ripen plenty of fruit, and by that means several very fine and interesting mule species have been raised, and much is still to be done in that way; the mule plants grow as freely and appear to flower more readily than the original species, and those that have been set with the pollen of P. ccerulca are very nearly hardy. They are all readily propagated from cuttings, plunged in heat, under a hand-glass, in sand or mould; the younger the cuttings, the sooner they root.

Paullinia succeeds well in a light loamy soil; and large cuttings root best, plunged under a hand-glass, in a pot of sand.

Pavetta belongs to the Rubiaceae, and is nearly related to Ixora. It thrives best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings root freely, planted in sand, and plunged under a hand-glass, in heat.

Pavonia is a genus belonging to the Malvaceae, which grows freely in a rich light soil, or in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass, and plenty of seeds are generally perfected.

Pectinari a belongs to the Stapelias; its species require the same treatment as Stapelia and Huernia.

Pedilanthus belongs to the Euphorbiaceas, and is very ornamental, from its curious shoe-shaped flowers, which are generally of a bright scarlet; its species grow freely in a light sandy soil, with the pots well drained, and they require but little water, or they will be liable to rot; cuttings taken off and stuck into the bark-bed, will root sooner than by any other means.

Pelargonium is a beautiful genus belonging to the Geraniaceae. Several of the succulent and tuberous-rooted species require rather more heat than that of a common greenhouse in winter. A light sandy loam mixed with peat, or an equal mixture of loam, peat, qnd sand, is the best compost for them ; and they should be kept very dry, when not in a growing state. Cuttings of the shrubby

l 2

kinds root readily, if taken off in the young wood, when the plants are growing freely, and let wither a little, to dry up the wound, before they are planted ; and several of the tuberous-rooted sorts may be increased by cuttings of the root, planted in the same kind of soil with their tops just above the surface, and not to be watered till the wound is dried over; they may then be watered, and they will soon make nice young plants.

Pelexia is an Orchideous genus, and thrives well in an equal proportion of loam and peat, and is increased by dividing at the root.

Peliosanthes grows best in a mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand, and is propagated by dividing at the root.

Pentadesma butyracea is the Butter and Tallow-tree of Sierra Leone; the best soil for it is an equal mixture of rich loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, would no doubt strike root, if placed under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Pentapetes belongs to the Malvaceae, and grows freely in a rich light soil, or a mixture of sandy loam and peat; cuttings soon strike root in sand, or mould, under a hand-glass.

Pentaptera is an East Indian genus, belonging to Combretaceae; its species will grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat, will soon strike root.

Peperomia is the herbaceous tribe of Pepper, the

greater part of which are more or less succulent; they grow freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be increased by cuttings, which root freely ; or by dividing at the root.

Pereskia is a genus of the Cacteae, which seldom flower in our collections, though several of the species are very beautiful; we would recommend their being exposed to the open air all summer, to all sorts of weather, afterwards to be kept dry for some time, till their stems become withered, after which give them a good supply of water, and we have no doubt but they would flower freely; cuttings taken off, and laid to dry till they are withered, and then planted, will soon strike root; a sandy loam, mixed with a little lime rubbish, appears to be the best soil to have a chance to flower them in.

Pergularia is a climbing genus belonging to As-clepiadeae, and much valued for the fragrance of its flowers. It succeeds well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root very readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Periptera, or Shuttlecock plant, is a genus belonging to the Malvacea;, with scarlet flowers; it succeeds well in a rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit it very well; and young cuttings planted in pots, in the same kind of soil, will soon strike root, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Persea, or the Alligator Pear, belongs to the Lau-rinse, and contains several species; all of which thrive well in a mixture of turfy loam and peat; l 3

they are best propagated by layers, which root readily; cuttings do not root so freely, but ripened shoots taken off at a joint, will sometimes root, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

Petiveria thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, or in a rich light soil; and cuttings strike root freely, under a hand-glass.

Petrea is a beautiful genus, which thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Petrobium belongs to the Composite; it grows freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings root readily, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, either with or without glass.

Pfaffia is a genus belonging to Amaranthaceae; it will grow freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, will soon strike root.

Pharus latifolius is a genus of the Grass tribe, which grows freely in a light loamy soil, and is increased by dividing it at the root, or by seed.

Phaseolus, or Kidney Bean. The perennial stove species thrive best in a light rich soil, and may be propagated readily from cuttings, or from seed. P. Caracalla, or Snail-flower, is a very curious species, and will grow and flower freely, if kept clear from the red spiders, which greatly annoy it.

PnAYLOPSisbelongstothe Acanthaceae; itsspecies will grow freely in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them very well.

Young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, on a little heat, will root in a few days.

Philoxerus belongs to the Amaranthaceae, and was divided from Gomphrena by Mr. Brown. The species thrive well in a light rich soil, and are readily increased by cuttings.

Phcenix is a genus of the Palms. Its species thrive well in a light sandy loam, and P. dactylifcra is raised readily from the Dates which are sold in the shops.

Pholidota is a parasitical genus of Orchideae, and requires the same treatment as Epidendrum and Oncidium.

Phrynium belongs to the Cannece: it thrives best in a light rich soil, and is increased by dividing at the root.

P h v l l a n tii u s is a very numerous genus, belonging to Euphorbiaceae. Its species succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Phylloma aloijioriwi is the Dracaena marginata of some authors, but differs essentially both from Dracaena and Aloe. It thrives well in a sandy loam, and requires very little water. It is increased by suckers.

Pu ytelephas belongs to Pandanae, and succeeds well in a sandy loam, mixed with a little peat.

Phytolacca, with some other genera, are now made into a natural Order, named Phytolaceae, by Mr. Brown. The stove species thrive well in L 4

a mixture of loam and peat, or in any light rich soil. Cuttings root readily under a hand-glass ; and they may be also raised from seeds, which are produced in abundance.

Piaranthus pullus is one of the Asclepiadeee, divided from Stapelia. A loamy soil, mixed with old lime rubbish and sand, is the best compost for it. A small pot, well drained with pieces of potsherds, suits it best, as it is liable to rot with too much wet. Cuttings should be laid by till shrivelled before planted, and then watered but sparingly.

Pjcramnia Antidesma thrives best in a loamy soil; and large cuttings strike freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Pictetia is a Papilionaceous genus, and grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; young cuttings root readily, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

Pimenta, or Allspice-tree, belongs to Myrtaceae ; it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and strikes freely from layers. Ripened cuttings, not taken at a joint, will also root freely in a pot of sand, placed under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Pinus Dammara, or Amboyna Pine, succeeds well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings do not root readily ; but ripened ones taken off at a joint, and planted in a pot of sand, not too close together, will strike root, under a hand-glass, in heat; when rooted, care must be taken in potting them off, as the roots are very apt to break off with the sand.

Piper, or the Peppers, are mostly of a rather succulent nature, and require but little water. Sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat, suits them well. They are readily increased by cuttings and suckers.

Piscidia, or Jamaica Dogwood, belongs to the Papilionaceae. Its species are strong, fast-growing plants, and we have never heard of their flowering in any collection ; which we suspect is through their being cut down so often to keep them within bounds. A sandy loam suits them best; and cuttings might be rooted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Pisonia belongs to the Nyctagineae. A mixture of loam and peat suits them well; and cuttings should be planted in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, where they will soon strike root.

Pitcairnia belongs to the Bromeliae. The different species succeed well in a light rich soil, or in a mixture of loam and peat, and flower freely. They are increased by suckers from the root.

Pittosporum is composed of a great many species, natives of different countries, the Canary Islands, the Cape of Good Hope, Guinea, China, and New Holland ; the greater part of them are Greenhouse plants; but there are also a few that require the Stove; they all succeed well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings, just ripened, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will strike root readily.

Platypteris is a genus belonging to Composite, the Spilanthes crocata of the Botanical Magazine : it grows freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, on a little bottom heat, will root readily.

Pleopeltis is a genus of Ferns ; its species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and succeed well in a shady situation; they may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seed.

Pleroma is a handsome genus of Melastomaceae; its species thrive well in a mixture of two thirds peat, and one third sandy loam; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a little moist bottom heat, will soon strike root.

Pleurothallis belongs to the Orchideae, and succeeds best in turfy peat soil, that is very sandy ; like the other stove genera of this order, it thrives best in a hot-bed frame in summer, and is increased by dividing at the root.

Plukenetia is a climbing genus belonging to the Euphorbiaceae. A light loamy soil suits it best; and cuttings strike root readily under a handglass, in sand.

Plumbago thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat. Its species flower freely, and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Plumeria is a fine flowering genus belonging to the Apocyneae. It succeeds best in a light rich loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat suits it

well; it requires but little water. Large cuttings, taken off and stuck in the tan, under a hand-glass, with all their leaves on, or planted in pots of mould without being watered, will grow freely. To have the plants flower well, they should be kept very dry when not in a growing state, which will throw them into bloom.

Po a is a genus of the Grass tribe. The stove species grow freely in a light loamy soil, and are increased by dividing them at the root, or by seed.

Podanthes isa genus separated from Stapelia by Mr. Haworth: its species require precisely the same sort of treatment as Stapelia and Huernia.

Pogostemon belongs to the Labiatse; it grows freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Poincian a, or BarbadoesFlower-fence, is a beautiful genus belonging to the Caesalpineae. The plants require to be kept in a strong heat, to flower well. A mixture of loam and peat suits them best; and cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a hand-glass. They are also readily raised from seeds, which are annually imported.

Poiretia isa climbing Papilionaceous genus; it grows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a little bottom heat, will strike root.

PoiTiEA is another Papilionaceous genus, which grows freely in an equal mixture of turfy loam

and peat; and cuttings not too much ripened, taken oft’ at a joint, and planted in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on a moist bottom heat, will root readily.

Poivrea belongs to the Combretaceae, and takes in all the species with 10 stamens and 5-angular seeds, that were before referred to Combretum: to it belongs C. purpureum now Poivrea coccinea of De Candolle; also C. comosum, and C. Af-zelii; the latter lately published in the Botanical Magazine by the name of C. grandiflorum ; but that is a very different plant, and octandrous, so that it is a true Combretum; they all succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and are the most desirable climbers for a Stove when they once get in a flowering state; most of them strike freely from young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat: but P. coccinea is more difficult to root; the best way to increase it readily, is to take up some roots from the old plant, and engraft one about four inches or more in length on the cutting ; several may then be planted in one pot, and they will be well taken in a short time, when they may be parted, and the string with which they were tied may be taken from them; they must still remain under cover for a short time, till they have made fresh roots : any quantity of them may soon be obtained by that means.

PoLiANTHEs,orTuberose,isimported in quantities every year, for forcing to flower in Autumn ; they

are very desirable plants, on account of the sweet scent of their flowers. The best soil for them is two-thirds sandy loam, and the rest peat, and they require to be brought forward in a hot-bed frame, or pit, or they will not flower in so great perfection; when in flower, they may be placed in a green-house, or warm room, where they will remain in flower for a considerable time.

Pollini a is a genus of Grasses ; the stove species will succeed well in a mixture of two-thirds loam, and one of peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root.

Polybotrya is a genus of Ferns ; an equal mixture of loam and peat suits them well, and a shady part of the hot-house; they may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Polypodium is another genus of Ferns. The stove species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat. They may be increased by dividing them at the root, or by seed.

Polyspora is a genus belonging to the Ternstroe-miaceae, and to the tribe Gordoniae, and to it belongs the Camellia axillaris, and some other species ; they thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings not too ripe, will strike root readily in pots of sand, under a hand-glass, but they must not be plunged in heat.

Polystachya is a parasitical genus of Orchideae, requiring the same kind of treatment as Epiden-drum, Oncidium, and other parasitical Orchideae.

Pombalia is an interesting genus, belonging to the Violariae ; it succeeds best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be increased by young cuttings, planted in pots, in the same sort of soil, and placed under a handglass, in heat, or by seeds.

Pong a mi a belongs to the Papilionaceae, and thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Pontedeira is an aquatic genus, which requires to be grown in a cistern, or pot of water, in a rich loamy soil, and may be increased by dividing the roots.

Ponthieva is a genus belonging to the Orchideae; its species thrive best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and like the rest of the family, succeed best in a hot-bed frame or pit in summer, and to be brought in the house in winter; the pots should be well drained with potsherds, and but very little water given, when not in a growing state; they are increased by dividing at the root.

Portlandia is a beautiful genus belonging to the Rubiaceae. It thrives best in a sandy loam, or a mixture of sandy loam and peat; but requires a strong heat to thrive well. Cuttings, with their leaves not shortened, will root freely in sand, plunged under a hand-glass, in heat.

Posoqueria is a genus belonging to Rubiaceae, and related to Gardenia; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings not too ripe, will root in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Potiios is a genus belonging to the Aroideae. It thrives well in a loamy soil, and is increased by dividing the roots, or by seed.

P o u p a rt i a belongs to the Spondiaceae; it succeeds well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Pourretia belongs to Bromeliaceae; its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and are increased by suckers from the root, or by seeds.

Prescotia is a genus of the Orchideae, requiring precisely the same treatment as Ponthieva.

Prestonia belongs to the Apocyneae ; its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings root readily, if planted thinly in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat.

Priva is a genus belonging to the Verbenaceae. It grows freely in a mixtuse of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass.

Prockia belongs to the Bixineae ; its species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings not quite ripened, will root readily, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under a handglass, on heat.

Prosopis is a genus belonging to the Mimoseas: its species thrive best in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a handglass. The pods of P. spicigera are eaten in India.

Psiadia grows freely in a rich light soil; and cuttings will root readily under a hand-glass.

Psidium, or Guava, is a genus belonging to the Myrtaceae: its species are in general cultivation in tropical countries, for the sake of their fruit. They grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and ripen their fruit readily. Cuttings might be rooted in sand, under a hand-glass, or they will root freely from layers.

Psilotum is a genus of the Ferns belonging to the section Lycopodineae. It grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root, if set in a shady situation.

Psychotria is a genus belonging to theRubiaceae. It grows best in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root readily, under a hand-glass, in sand.

Pteris is a genus of Ferns. The Stove species thrive best in a mixture of loam and peat, and are readily increased by dividing them at the root, or by seed.

Pterocarpus belongs to the Papilionaceae. It thrives best in a light loamy soil; and cuttings, not deprived of their leaves, will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Piero sperm um is a fine genus belonging to Butt-neriaceae. They thrive well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, not deprived of their leaves, will root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Pueraria is a climbing Papilionaceous genus, related to Hedysarum, with large tuberous roots. Its species succeed best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings will strike root, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

P up a li a is a genus belonging to the Amarantha-ceae, which grows readily in a light rich soil; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass, in heat.

Q.

Qualea is a handsome Brazilian genus, belonging to Vochyseae. Its species thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a handglass, on heat, will strike root.

Quassia is a fine free-flowering genus, and easily managed, but requires a strong heat; it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings taken off at a joint, and not deprived of their leaves, root readily, plunged under a hand-glass, in a pot of sand.

Quisqualis is a fine climbing genus of easy culture, belonging to the Combretaceae ; there are now several species in our collections, but we have only seen the Q. indica in flower. Mr. D. Lockhart informs us, he has seen a species in Africa, with fine scarlet flowers, probably one of • those described by Palisot de Beauvois. The best

M

soil for them is a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Qui vi si a is a pretty genus belonging to Meliaceae. It succeeds well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings not quite ripened, will root readily, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

R.

Rajania belongs to the Dioscoreae; and thrives well in a rich loamy soil. It is readily increased by dividing the roots.

Randia belongs to the Rubiaceae; and is nearly allied to Gardenia. The best soil for the species is a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings not too ripe will strike root in sand, under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Rauwolfia belongs to the Apocyneae. It thrives best in loam and peat; and cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Ren anthera is a splendid genus of the parasitical Orchideae; of a stiff, upright, but rather climbing habit, throwing out large fleshy roots, as it advances upwards, which catch hold of any thing within their reach. It was several years in our collections before it made any attempt to flower, but the flowers were at length attained in abundance, in His Royal Highness the Prince of Saxe Cobourg’s collection at Claremont, where the

fleshy roots were tied up with moss by Mr. Fair-bairn, then gardener there ; the moss was kept moist, and the plant soon produced abundance of fine scarlet flowers: we have since seen it flower in other collections, by the same management. The bottom of the plant should be grown in turfy peat, and it may be increased readily, by taking of the top with a root, which is easily attainable, and the old plant will soon produce a new top.

Renealmia is a genus of Scitamineae, the species of which have till latelybeen joined with Alpinia; but, as Mr. Roscoe observes, it is the original genus of Linnaeus, and quite distinct enough from Alpinia, he has restored it; its flowers are tubular, and not lipped, as in Alpinia. The species grow freely in a mixture of turfy loam and peat, and are increased by dividing at the root.

Requienta is a Papilionaceous genus. The stove species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will strike root readily.

Rh a pi s is a genus of the Palms which thrives well in a sandy loam, and is readily increased by suckers from the root.

Riiipsalis is a succulent genus belonging to the Nopaleae. It requires but little water, and to be planted in small pots in a sandy loam, mixed with brick rubbish. Cuttings must be dried a little before planting, and then they will root m 2

readily, by standing them on an airy shelf, in the hot-house.

Rhopala belongs to the Proteaceae, and thrives best in a sandy loam, mixed with a little peat. Cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a handglass.

Rich ARDsoNiA is a genus belonging to the Rubi-aceae, and thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings may be rooted in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass.

Riedleia belongs to the Buttneriaceae; its species grow freely in a mixture of turfy loam and peat; and cuttings, planted in pots of the same kind of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Ritchie a belongs to the Capparideae, a genus divided from Cratava, by Mr. Brown; the R. fragrans is a plant that climbs a little, and flowers freely ; the flowers are of a greenish white, and sweet scented. It succeeds well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Rivina belongs to the order of Phytolaceae. Its species grow freely in a light rich soil, or a mixture of loam and peat suits them very well. They are readily increased by cuttings or seed.

Rodriguezia is a very handsome genus of Or-chideous plants, which may be grown parasitical upon a tree, with cocoa-nut shells fastened round it, a little moss being put round the roots,

when first placed in; it will also thrive well in pots of turfy peat soil, particularly if grown in a hot-bed frame in summer; the fine scarlet flowers are produced in abundance, and at different seasons; and it is propagated by dividing at the root.

Rolandra thrives best in a rich light soil, and it is readily increased by cuttings.

Rondeletia belongs to the Rubiaceae, and thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Rosco.t.a is a pretty flowering genus belonging to the Scitamineae; its species thrive well in an equal mixture of rich turfy loam, peat, and sand ; and they are increased by dividing at the root.

Rottlera tinctoria grows freely in loam and peat; and cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Rourea belongs to the Connaracea?; it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a handglass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Roxburgh i a is a pretty climbing genus. Its species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and may be increased, but not readily, by dividing at the root.

Rub us, or Bramble. The tropical species of this genus grow well in a rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and are readily increased by suckers, or cuttings, which strike root freely.

Rudolphi a is a climbing genus belonging to Pa-pilionaceae; it is nearly related to Butea and m 3

Erythrina. Its species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat, will soon strike root.

Ruellia is a pretty genus, of easy culture, belonging to the Acanthaceae. It thrives well in a light rich soil; and cuttings strike root readily, in pots of the same sort of soil, placed under hand-glasses, in heat.

Ruizia belongs to the Malvaceas, and grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass. The plant called Ruizia aurea in the gardens, is Cossignia borbonica, and belongs to Sapindaceae.

RussELiAisa pretty genus belonging to the Scro-phularinae. It thrives best in a rich light soil; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, on heat.

Ruyschia belongs to the Marcgraviaeeae. Its species thrive well in two-thirds of sandy loam, and one-third peat, or any other rich light soil; and cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will not be difficult to root.

Ryanea belongs to the Patrisieae tribe of Flacour-tianece. It thrives best in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

S.

Sabal is a genus of the Palms, which grows best in a light sandy loam, and may be occasionally increased by suckers.

S a bice a belongs to the Rubiaceie, to the tribe of Hamelieae. Its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings scarcely ripened, strike root readily in a pot of sand, placed under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Saccharum, or Sugar-cane, grows freely in a rich loamy soil, and may be increased by suckers; or cuttings of the stem will shoot out young plants at their joints.

Sagittaria belongs to the Alismaceae; it is a genus of water-plants, containing species that require the stove, and greenhouse, and others that are hardy. The stove species may be grown in a tub or large pot, filled with a loamy soil at the bottom, and then filled up with water; and they may be increased by seeds, or dividing at the root.

Sagr^a is a handsome genus belonging to Melas-tomaceae. Its species grow freely in a mixture of two-thirds peat, and one-third loam ; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, or in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on bottom heat, will strike root readily.

S a c, v s is a fine genus of the Palms, requiring a sandy loam, and a strong moist heat, to make the species thrive. The best plants are at Messrs. Loddiges’. m 4

Salmea is a climbing genus belonging to the Composite, which grows well in rich light mould ; and young cuttings root readily in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Salvia consists of numerous handsome species, which thrive best in a rich light soil; and cuttings root freely in the same sort of soil, under a handglass, or without glasses, in a shady situation.

Samyda is a pretty genus, and the species thrive best in a mixture of loam and peat, but are rather shy growers. Cuttings are not difficult to root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Sandoric.um belongs to theMeliaceae. Itgrows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings nearly ripened, planted in pots of sand, and placed under hand-glasses, on a bottom heat, will soon strike root.

Sanseviera is a succulent genus; and a sandy loam, mixed with some old lime and brick rubbish, suits it well, with very little water, except when in agrowing state. It may be increased by suckers from the root.

Santalum, or Sandal-wood, thrives best in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings may be struck in sand, under a hand-glass.

Sapindus, or Soap-berry Tree, thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and large cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Sapium ancuparium belongs to the Euphorbiaceae, and is related to Hippomane, or the Manchineel-

tree. The best soil for it is a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Sa rca nth us is a parasitical genus of Orchideae; and the best treatment for the different species, to make them flower freely, is the same as recommended under Renanthera, to which they are nearly allied in habit.

Sarcocepha lus is a fruit bearing genus, belonging to Rubiaceae; known by the name of the Sierra Leone peach, and also as the fig of that country; it grows very freely in a rich light soil, or a mixture of turfy loam and peat suits it very well; cuttings strike root very readily, if planted in pots of sand, and placed in heat, under a hand-glass.

Sarcolobus is a climbing genus belonging to the Asclepiadeac. Its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a handglass, on a little heat, will root readily.

Sarcostemma is another climbing genus belonging to the Asclepiadeae. It thrives best in loam and peat, and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Saurauja belongs to the Ternstroemiacea:: its species thrive well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings nearly ripened will root readily in sand, under a hand-glass, on heat.

ScAivoLA belongs to the Goodenovieae. The Stove species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam

and peat, and being of a succulent habit, care must be taken that they do not get over watered, or they will be liable to rot; young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Schalfferia is a genus related to Ilhamneae : its species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings nearly ripened, root readily in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Schinus belongs to the order of Terebintaceas, and grows freely in loam and peat; ripened cuttings root, freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Sciiiz^ea is a genus of Ferns, belonging to the tribe Osmundaceae. The Stove species thrive best in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and they may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Schmidelia belongs to the Sapindaceaj. Its species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings nearly ripened, will root readily in pots of sand, placed under a handglass, on heat.

Schotia is a beautiful genus, and several species have been introduced by Mr. William Burchell. They require rather more warmth than a common greenhouse, to keep them in good health through the winter. The coldest part of the stove will suit them better; but they should not be plunged in the tan, as they want no bottom heat. A mixture of loam and peat is the best soil for them; and cuttings planted in sand,and plunged in mould (not in tan), under a hand-glass, will strike root.

Schrankia is a genus belonging to the Mimosae. It grows best in loam and peat; and cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a bell-glass.

Schwencki a belongs to the Scrophularinae: its species grow freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, either with or without glass, will root freely.

Sciodaphyllum belongs to the Araliaceae: its species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily in a pot of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Scutia belongs to theRhamnese. It succeeds well in a mixture of two-thirds sandy loam, and the rest peat; ripened cuttings will root readily, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in a moist heat.

Seaforthia is a fine New Holland genusofPalms, which thrive well in a mixture of two-thirds sandy loam, and the other part peat; it is not so tender as the greater part of the Palms, so that a common heated stove will be sufficient for it.

Secamone is a genus belonging to the Asclepia-deae : it thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat, and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass.

Securidaca is a climbing genus, and grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a bell-glass.

Securinega nitida, or Otaheite Myrtle, belongs to the Euphorbiaceae; it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, and flowers freely. Cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass. *

Selloa is a genus belonging to the Composite ; it thrives well in any rich light soil, and produces its sweet-scented flowers early in spring. Young cuttings, slipped off and planted in a pot of the same kind of soil, and placed in a shady situation, will root without any farther trouble, only to water them when dry. Perhaps it may be hardy enough to thrive in the greenhouse.

Senacia belongs to the Pittosporeae; its species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat, or any rich light soil; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat, will soon strike root.

Seriana is a genus belonging to the Sapindaceas; it thrives best in a sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Sesbana is a handsome genus belonging to the Papilionaceae ; its species thrive best in a mixture of loam and peat, but require to be kept in a warm situation in winter, or they will not thrive; the houses in which they are, ought never to be below 70 degrees of Fahrenheit’s scale ; cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass, on heat.

Sesuvium is a succulent genus belonging to the Ficoideae. A light sandy loam mixed with peat suits it best; and it requires but little water. Cuttings, planted in a pot of the same kind of soil, and watered but sparingly, will soon strike root.

Sethi a belongs to the Erythroxyleae : it will grow freely in an equal mixture of rich turfy loam and

peat; and ripened cuttings will root readily, planted in pots of sand, and placed under handglasses, on a moist heat.

Si da is a genus belonging to the Malvaceae, which thrives well in a rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; they are free flowerers, and generally produce perfect seeds, by which they are readily increased. Cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Sidekodendron, or Iron-tree, belongs to the Ru-biaceae; it grows best in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Sideroxylon, or Iron-wood, belongs to the Sa-poteae. The Stove species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings not too ripe, will strike root, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Simaba belongs to the Simarubea?; it thrives best in a mixture of light turfy loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in pots of sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Simaruba is nearly related to the last genus, and requires the same treatment.

Singana belongs to the Guttifene: it succeeds best in two-thirds rich loam, and a third of peat; and ripened cuttings will not be difficult to root, if planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Sinningia is a succulent genus, belonging to the Gesnereae. Its species succeed well in any rich

light soil; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, or without a glass in a shady situation, will soon strike root.

Siphonia, or Elastic-gum tree, belongs to the Eu-phorbiacese ; it grows freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings not quite ripened, will root readily, planted in pots, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Sloanea thrives best in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings might be rooted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Smeathmannia is a Sierra Leone genus, belonging to Passifloreae. It thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings not too ripe, will soon root in sand, under a hand-glass, on heat.

Solandra is a fine genus belonging to the So-laneae ; of which four species are now in our collections ; if allowed plenty of room and moisture, they grow very rapidly, but produce no flowers. The best way is to plant them in a loamy soil, and allow them to grow fast at first, till they have made a great many shoots: then keep them very dry till their leaves drop off, and they will produce plenty of flowers. Cuttings, taken off and stuck in a pot of mould, or in the tan-bed, will root without any further care. The best way to have plants flower young, is to take the cuttings from the flowering shoots.

Solanum is an extensive genus, and some of the

species are very handsome ; they are easily managed, and flower freely, and many of them produce perfect fruit. Most of them like a light rich soil, or they will do very well in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Sonnkrati a belongs to the Myrtaceae ; its species succeed well in a mixture of two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a handglass, on a little bottom heat, will strike root readily.

Soph or a thrives well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Sophronitis is a genus of Parasitical Orchideae, thriving best in turfy peat soil, and if convenient, to be stood in a hot-bed frame or pit in summer, and to be removed to the hot-house in autumn; they may be increased by dividing at the root.

Spathelia is a genus belonging to the Terebin-thaceas; it thrives well in a light loamy soil; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Spathodea is a genus belonging to Bignoniacese; its species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat, or any other light rich soil; and young cuttings root readily in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Spennera is a pretty genus belonging to Melas-tomaceae ; its species grow freely in a mixture of

one-third sandy loam, and two-thirds peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil or in sand, will soon strike root, if placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Spermacoce, or Button-weed, is a genus belonging to the Rubiaceae, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass.

Sph-Skanthus thrives well in a light rich soil; and cuttings strike root freely.

Spilantiies grows best in a rich light soil, and is readily increased either by seeds or cuttings.

Sp jr anther a belongs to the Rutaceae; it grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings just ripened, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat,will root freely.

Spondias, or Hog-plum, belongs to the Terebin-taceae; it grows freely in loam and peat, and large cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Stachytarpheta is a pretty genus belonging to the Verbenaceae. S. mutabilis is a very beautiful species, and nearly always in flower. A light rich soil suits the species best, or they will thrive well in loam and peat; young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, will strike root readily, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Stapelia is a succulent genus belonging to the Asclepiadeae ; most of the species bear handsome and curious flowers, but the smell of some of them is very disagreeable. The best soil for them is a sandy loam, mixed with old lime or brick

rubbish; if planted in a richer soil, they will thrive better for a time, and will produce larger flowers; but then they are very apt to rot off, particularly if they happen to get a little too much water: a very little water serves them, except when in flower, when it may be given more freely. They are readily increased by cuttings, which should be laid to dry in the stove, till they begin to shrivel; then planted in pots, they will root immediately. If planted as soon as taken off, when full of juice, they are likely to rot: the plants from wffich the cuttings are taken must also be dried after, or the wound will sometimes rot the plant.

Starkea is a genus belonging to the Composite; a rich light soil suits it best, and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass.

Stelis is a genus of the Orchideae, growing best in pots of turfy peat that is very sandy; in summer they succeed best and grow more freely, where they also produce their flowers more readily, in a hot-bed frame or pit, and, like the rest of the family, to be shaded from the sun in warm weather; in winter, when they are removed to the house, they require but very little water; their flowers are not very showy, but some of them are very fragrant in the evening. They may be increased by dividing them at the root.

Stemodia belongs to the Scrophularineae, and thrives best in a light rich soil. Cuttings root freely under a hand-glass, on heat.

N

Stenorhynchus is a genus of Orchideae ; some of the species are very pretty, and are not difficult of culture. The best soil for them is an equal mixture of loam and peat, and the pots to be well drained, with potsherds broken small, that the moisture may drain off readily ; a moist heat and shade in summer suits them best, and a dry heat in winter. They may be increased, though sparingly, by dividing at the root.

Stenotapiirum is a genus of Grasses, which succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root.

Stephania belongs to the Capparideae ; it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings just ripened, will strike readily, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Sterculia is rather an order than a genus; and the plants that compose it are very different both in habit and character; but they will all thrive well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat. Ripened cuttings, not deprived of their leaves, will strike root readily in sand, under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Sti la g o thrives best in a light loamy soil; and cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Stillingia is a genus belonging to the Euphor-biacese : it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Stravadium is a genus of Myrtaceas, nearly related to Barringtonia. Its species succeed well

in an equal mixture of rich loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will strike root.

Strelitzia is a grand genus belonging to the Mu-saceae, generally kept in the stove, but will thrive and flower as well in a green-house or conservatory. A light sandy loam is the best soil for the species, and they may be increased, but slowly, by suckers. By rubbing the pollen on the stigma when the plants are in bloom, perfect seeds are readily obtained.

Streptium belongs to the Verbenaceae ; it thrives well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots, in the same sort of soil, strike root freely.

Strophanthus is a curious genus belonging to the Apocyneae; its species succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings strike root readily in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Strychnos, or Poison-nut, belongs to the Apocyneae. A mixture of loam and peat suits it well; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Stylosantiies belongs to the Papilionaceae; its species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat, will strike root readily.

Swartzi a belongs to the Leguminosee, and forms, with a few other genera, a suborder. Its species succeed well in a mixture of two-thirds sandy loam, and the rest peat; and ripened cuttings n 2

succed well in a pot of sand, placed under a handglass, on a moist heat.

Sivietenia, or Mahogany-tree, thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripe cuttings, with their leaves not shortened, will root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Stagrus is a genus of Palms, native of Brazil, requiring to be grown in a rich sandy loam, and a moist heat.

Syzigium is a genus of tropical fruits, belonging to Myrtaceae. Its species have generally been referred to Eugenia or Calyptranthes, but are now restored by M. De Candolle to the present genus. They grow readily in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings taken off at a joint, and planted in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on moist heat, will strike root freely.

T.

Tabernalmontana is a pretty genus of sweet scented flowers, belonging to the Apocyneae, they thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Tacca grows well in a mixture of loam, peat, and sand: its species require but little water in winter ; if too much be given, it will rot their roots. T. integrifolia flowers freely, and is readily increased by suckers from the root.

Tacuigalia is a genus belonging to Leguminosfe, of the tribe of Cassieae. It grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings not too much ripened, will strike root in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Tacsonia belongs to the Passiflorae; its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and are handsome climbers. Cuttings will root readily in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Ta:nitis is a genus of Ferns; the Stove species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and may be increased by dividing at the root.

Taliera is a genus of Palms, which will succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and require to be grown in a strong heat.

TALAUMAisa genus belonging to the Magnoliaceae; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and may be increased by inarching on the purple Magnolia, or by laying; cuttings nearly ripened will also root in pots ot sand, placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Talinum is a genus belonging to the Portulaceae: they are of a succulent nature, and require but little water. A light sandy loam, or a mixture of sandy loam and peat, suits them best; and cuttings strike root freely.

Tam akin dus, or Tamarind-tree, thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root under a bell-glass, in sand.

n 3

Tamarix grows well in loam and peat; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Tecoma is a genus belonging to the Bignoniaceae, and many of the species are handsome climbers, others are upright shrubs; they all grow freely in a rich light loam, mixed with peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, in heat, or in a close hot-bed frame, will strike root readily; many of them may also be increased by cuttings of the roots, planted with their tops above the surface of the mould, that they may not rot.

Tectona grandis, or Teak-wood, succeeds best in a mixture of loam and peat, but requires a strong heat to succeed well; ripened cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Tephrosi a is a pretty Papilionaceous genus; some of the species have very handsome foliage, and others produce handsome flowers, but it still contains many anomalous species, and will require to be still divided into several genera; the Stove species succeed best in loam and peat, and are propagated by seeds; or young cuttings, planted in pots, and placed under a bell-glass, in sand, will strike root.

Ter a mn us is a climbing genus belonging to Pa-pilionaceae ; it succeeds well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and a bell-glass placed over them, in a stove in a shady situation, will not be difficult to root.

Terminalia belongs to the Combretaceae: its species grow freely in a sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, not deprived of their leaves, will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Ternstrcemia is a genus belonging to the Tern-strcemiaceae ; its species succeed well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of turfy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat, will soon root.

Tetracera is a handsome genus of climbing plants, belonging to Dilleniaceae. Its species succeed well in a mixture of turfy loam and peat, but are fond of a strong heat to grow in; cuttings root freely in pots of sand, placed under a handglass, on heat.

Tetr a d i u m belongs to the Connaraceae; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Tktramerium is a genus related to Coffea; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Tetranema is a Papilionaceous genus; it succeeds well in a mixture of loam and peat, or any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat, will not be difficult to root.

Tetr a nth era belongs to the Laurinae; its species

N 4

grow freely in a mixture of light loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Tetrazvgia is a handsome genus, belonging to Melastomaceae; its species succeed well in two thirds peat soil, and one third loam ; and young cuttings planted in the same sort of soil, or in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat, will root readily.

Teucrium belongs to the Labiatae. Thestove species grow best in a rich light soil, and are readily increased by cuttings.

Tiialia is a genus of water-plants, belonging to Canneae ; the Stove species require to be grown in a tub or large pot of water, with mud at the bottom, and may be increased by seeds, or dividing at the root.

Tiienardia is a climbing genus, that belongs to the Apocyneae. It succeeds well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings will root readily, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Tiieobroma, or Chocolate-nut Tree, belongs to Buttneriaceae, and thrives best in a light rich soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit it well; cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Theoph rasta is a handsome genus of plants, several species of which are now in our collections; they are much esteemed on account of their large and grand-looking foliage. Its species grow well in sandy loam, or in a mixture of light turfy

loam and peat; and cuttings, with their leaves not shortened, will root readily in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Thespesia belongs to the Malvaceae ; the Hibiscus populneus belongs to it, a native of the East Indies. It succeeds well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit it very well; cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, or in a pot of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will root freely.

Thrinax is a genus of the Palms, which thrives best in a sandy loam, and may be raised from fresh imported seeds.

Thrvallis belongs to the Malpighiaceae ; it succeeds best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Thunbergia isapretty climbing genus belonging to the Acanthacese; its species are nearly always in flower, and produce seeds freely: there are several handsome species now in our collections. A mixture of loam and peat suits them best; and young cuttings root readily under a handglass, on heat.

Tibouchina belongs to the Melastomaceae ; it grows freely in a mixture of two thirds sandy peat, and one third loam; and young cuttings root without difficulty in the same sort of soil, or in a pot of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Tic ore a belongs to the Rutaceae, to the section Cusparieae. Its species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings just ripened, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will root readily.

Ti li acor a is a genus of climbing plants, belonging to the Menispermaceae. It grows freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Tillandsia belongs to the Bromelias. Several of the species are parasitical, and may be treated in the same manner as the parasitical Orchideae, either to be hung up in baskets of moss, or to be fixed to a tree with cocoa-nut shells nailed round it, putting some moss round the roots when first put in, and supplying them regularly with water, in the same manner as -brides, Epi-dendrum, &c. The larger growing species may be treated like Pitcairnia and Bromelia; they are increased by suckers, or from seeds.

Tococa belongs to the Melastomaceae; it succeeds best in one third sandy loam, and two thirds peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat, will root readily.

Toddalia belongs to the Pteleaceae ; its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings will root freelydn pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Tonsella belongs to the Hippocrateaceae; its spe-

cies succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Tourneeortia is a genus belonging to the Bora-gineae; the species thrive well in a rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them very well. Cuttings root freely in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass.

Traijescantia, or Spider-wort, belongs to the order of Commelinea?. A light sandy soil suits the species best; and they may be increased by dividing them at the root, or by seed.

Tragi a is a genus belonging to the EuphorbiaceaL A light rich soil suits the species best, and cuttings strike root freely.

Trevirana coccinea is Ackimenes coccinea of Per-soon, and Cyrilla pulchella of some authors: it grows freely, and flowers abundantly, in a mixture of sandy loam and peat. As soon as the flowering season is over, the pots should be kept dry, till the roots begin to vegetate, wrhen they should be taken out of the pots, and divided; five or six strong roots are sufficient for a sixty size pot; then by keeping them moist and warm, they will grow strong, and flower freely, and their fine scarlet flowers make them very desirable.

T rewia grows best in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root best in sand, under a hand-glass.

Tribrachia is a genus of parasitical Orchideae; it succeeds well in a mixture of turfy peat, and

thrives best in a hot-bed frame or pit in summer; to be shaded from the sun in warm weather, and to be removed to the stove in autumn; it is only to be increased by dividing at the root.

Tribulus is a genus belonging to the Rutacem: it grows best in a rich light soil; and cuttings will root freely in sand or mould, under a hand-glass, on heat.

Trichilia belongs to the Meliaceas, and thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass, on heat.

Trichosanthes tubcrosa, or Snake Gourd, thrives best in a rich sandy loam; and cuttings will root freely, under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Tkidentea belongs to the Stapeliaj; it requires precisely the same sort of treatment as Stapelia and Huernia.

Trigonia belongs to theHippocrateaceae ; it grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings strike root readily in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on heat.

Triopteris belongs to the Malpighiaceae; its species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will root readily.

Triphasia belongs to the Aurantiacea;, and is a genus separated from Limonia. Its species grow freely in a mixture of turfy loam and peat; but care must be taken not to sodden them with water in winter. Cuttings not too ripe, but

ripened at the base, will strike root readily, in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, oh heat.

Tripinnarj a is a native of the Mauritius ; it succeeds well in a mixture of two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third peat; and ripened cuttings root freely in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on a moist heat.

Triplaris belongs to the Polygone*; it grows freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, will root readily, either in a shady situation, or under a handglass, on heat.

Triumfetta is a genus belongingto theTiliaceae. A mixture of loam and peat suits the species best; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass ; they also ripen plenty of seeds.

Trizeuxis is a parasitical genus of Orchideae, and requires the same sort of treatment as Tribrachia.

Tromotriche is a genus of the Stapeliae; the flowers are fringed with hairs tipped with glands, which shake with the least touch. Its species require precisely the same sort of treatment as Stapelia.

Trophis, or Ramoon-tree, grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings may be rooted under a hand-glass, in sand.

Tupistra is a genus related to Aroideae; its species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and are readily increased by dividing at the root.

Turner a thrives well in a rich light soil, and

seeds freely. Cuttings strike root readily under a hand-glass.

Turpinia belongs to the Celastrineae ; its species succeed best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Turrjea belongs to Meliaceae ; its species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on moist heat, will soon root.

Tylophora is a climbing genus of Asclepiadeae ; it succeeds well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, in a moist heat, will strike root readily.

U.

Uncaria is a genus belonging to Rubiaceae, and to the tribe Cinchonacea; it is nearly related to Nauclea; and most of the species are natives of the East Indies, or Islands at no great distance from thence. Its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings not quite ripened, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will strike root in a few days.

Unona is a genus belonging to the Anonaceae. A light loamy soil suits it best; and ripened cuttings will strike root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Urania speciosa, the Ravtnalia of some authors, belongs to the Musacese: it thrives best in a sandy loam, mixed with a little peat, and requires a good supply of water and a strong heat to make it grow luxuriantly. Fresh imported seeds vegetate freely.

Ur a ri a is a Papilionaceous genus, separated from Iledysarum. Its species succeed well in any rich soil, or an equal mixture of loam and peat; they may be increased by seeds ; or young cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a handglass, on a little moist heat, will soon root.

Urena is a genus belonging to the Malvaceae, and thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat : the species generally ripen plenty of seeds; and cuttings will root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Urtica, or Nettle. The stove species of this genus thrive well in a rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat suits them very well. Cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Urvill/ea is a climbing genus belongingto Sapin-daceae ; its species succeed well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of sandy loam and peat will suit it very well; young cuttings root readily, planted in a pot of sand, and placed under a handglass, on a moist heat.

Uvari a belongs to the Anonaceaj, and thrives best in a sandy loam, mixed with a little peat. Ripened cuttings will root in sand, plunged under a hand-glass, on heat.

V.

Vallaris is a genus of climbing plants, belonging to Apocineae. They succeed well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of sandy loam and peat will suit them very well; young cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will root readily.

VALLEsrA is another genus belonging to Apocineae, and requires the same treatment as the last genus.

Vanda is a parasitical genus of the Orchidea;, which thrives well against the rough bark of a tree, if fixed up in cocoa-nut shells in moss, and some moss tied round their roots. Its species also grow freely in pots of turfy peat, particularly if grown in a hot-bed frame in summer. They are readily increased by cuttings.

Vangueria is a handsome genus belonging to the Rubiaceae. A mixture of sandy loam and peat suits its species best; and cuttings root freely in sand, plunged in heat, under a hand-glass.

Vanilla is a curious trailing genus belonging to the Orchideae: it is parasitical on the trees in tropical climates, shooting out roots at every joint, which lay hold of the bark of the trees on which they grow: the species grow best put in moss in cocoa-nut shells nailed on the rough bark of an elm-tree, where they will grow very strong and vigorous, their roots catching hold of the bark, and by that means supporting them-

selves; some moss should be also tied to their roots, and kept moist; in such situations they will flower, which they seldom do in pots. If planted in pots, the best soil is turfy peat; and the plants will then require a wall or tree, or something of that kind for their roots to lay hold of, or they cannot grow strong and healthy. They are readily increased by cuttings.

Vellosia is a handsome Brazilian genus, belonging to Hypoxideae ; its species succeed well in two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third peat; and they may be increased by suckers from the root, or the frutescent species from the young branches, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under hand-glasses, on heat.

Ventilago is a climbing genus, belonging to the Rhamnese ; it succeeds well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings not too ripe, root readily in sand, under a hand-glass, on heat.

Verbesixa is a genus of the Compositae, which grows freely in a light rich soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass.

Vernonia is another genus of Compositae; the Stove species grow freely in any rich light soil, and may be increased by seeds; or young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Vxlmorinia is a handsome Papilionaceous genus, thriving well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be raised from seeds; or

young cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Vinca rosea is a pretty plant, and continually in flower; it thrives well in a light rich soil; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass: there are several handsome varieties of this species.

Vismia belongs to the Hypericineas; its species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings not quite ripened, will soon strike root, in pots of sand, under a hand-glass, on heat.

Vitex, or Chaste-tree, is a genus belonging to the Verbenacete: the species thrive best in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Vittaria is a genus of the Ferns, which grows well in loam and peat; and its species are increased by dividing them at the root, or by seeds.

Vochysia is a handsome genus of plants, chiefly natives of Brazil, Trinidad, and Guiana ; its species succeed well in a mixture of two-thirds light loam, and one-third peat; ripened cuttings strike root readily in pots of sand, placed under a handglass, on a moist heat.

Vohiria is a handsome genus of perennial herbaceous plants, belonging to Gentianae ; its species succeed best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and must be increased by seeds.

Volkameria belongs to the Verbenaceae, and thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Vouapa belongs to the Leguminosae, and to the suborder Cassieae; it succeeds well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, with their leaves not shortened, will root in sand, placed under a hand-glass, on a good moist heat.

W.

Walkera belongs to the Ochnaceae; the best soil for it is an equal mixture of rich sandy loam and peat; and cuttings not quite ripened, will root in sand, under a hand-glass, with a good bottom heat.

Wallichia is a genus of Palms, requiring to be grown in a rich loamy soil, in a warm situation.

Waltheria grows best in a light rich soil or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Web era (the Cupia of De Candolle) is a genus belonging to the Rubiaceae, which thrives well in loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Wedeli a is a genus of Composite ; its species succeed well in any rich light soil, and may be increased by seeds; or young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, and placed under a handglass, or in a shady part of the house, will soon produce roots.

Weinmannia belongs to the Cunoniaceae; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings not quite ripened, will root in sand, under a hand-glass, on a little heat.

Wig an niA belongs to the Hydroleacete; its spe-

o 2

cies grow freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Wi llughbeta is a climbing genus, belonging to Apocinea;; it grows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will soon strike root.

Witherin'gi a belongs to the Solaneae; its species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will soon strike root under a hand-glass.

Wittlesbachia (the Cochlospermum of De Candolle) is a fine genus belonging toTernstroemiaceae; its species grow freely in any rich soil, or a mix-tureof two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third peat, will suit it very well; young cuttings, planted in sand or mould, and placed under a hand-glass, on heat, will strike root freely.

Woodsia is a genus of Ferns ; the Stove species thrive well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seed.

Woemia is a genus belonging to the Dilleniaceae; its species grow freely in two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third peat; and cuttings not too ripe, root readily in pots of sand, under a hand-glass, on a moist heat; but none of their leaves should be shortened.

Wrightia is a genus belonging to the Apocyneag, which thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat;

and cuttings root readily in sand, under a handglass.

X.

Xanthochymusbelongs toGuttiferae, several species of which are now in our collections; the best soil for them is two thirds sandy loam, and the rest peat; and cuttings, not too ripe, will root in sand, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Ximenia is a genus belonging to the Olacineae, which thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Xiphidium is a genus belonging to the Ilannodo-raceae ; the species thrive best in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand, and are increased by dividing the roots.

Xiphopteris is a genus of Ferns, thriving well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Xylobium is a parasitical genus of Orchideae, requiring the same treatment as Epidendrum.

Xylopiiylla belongs to the Euphorbiaceae, and consists of several species, which are favourite plants, on account of their producing flowers out of the teeth of the leaves; an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for them; and ripened cuttings root freely in a pot of sand, under a hand-glass, on heat.

Xylopia is a genus belonging to the Anonaceae, which grows best in sandy loam, or a mixture of o 3

loam and peat; and ripened cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Z.

Zamia is a genus related to the Palms, but belonging to the Cycadeae. A light sandy loam suits the species best, and several of the species may be increased by dividing them at the root.

Zanthoxylum, or Tooth-ach Tree, belongs to the Terebinthaceae. The stove species grow well in a sandy loam, and cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Zapania belongs to the Verbenacese, and grows freely in a light rich soil; and cuttings strike root freely, under a hand-glass.

Zingiber, or Ginger, grows best in a mixture of loam, peat, and sand; its species are increased by dividing them at the root.

ZizYPHUsisa genus belonging to the Rhamneae ; the Stove species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Zornia is a genus belonging to the Papilionaceae, which grows freely in a light rich soil; and cuttings root readily, under a hand-glass, in sand.

Zygopetalum is a fine parasitical genus of Orchi-deae ; its species succeed well in pots of a light turfy peat; and if convenient, to be removed into a hot-bed frame or pit in summer; but to be taken back to the stove early in autumn. The only way of increasing them is by dividing at the root.-

THE GENERAL MANAGEMENT

OF

GREENHOUSE PLANTS.

Greenhouse Plants, properly so called, are plants which only require protection from frost in winter. The more air they have given them when not frosty, the more healthy they will be. On a tine morning, the sooner air is admitted the better; but it is best to shut up pretty early in the afternoon, particularly if likely to be a cold night. No fire is required, except frost is expected in the night, or the house should be damp with continued wet weather; then a little fire is requisite to dry the house, as plants are more liable to be injured by damp than by cold; and if the frost is kept out of the house, it is all that is needed. The plants should be looked over most days, to see if any require water, which must only be given when quite dry; in the winter season, from nine to twelve o'clock in the morning is the best time for watering them; for, if watered in the afternoon, they are apt to be chilled at night, which makes their leaves look yellow and unhealthy. When the surface of the mould is green with moss, &c. the top should be taken off and the surface moved with a flat stick;

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but not deep enough to disturb the roots : if a little fresh mould is wanting on any of them, it should be added ; always being careful to put the same kind of soil they are already grown in; for we have seen a different kind put on sometimes, which injures plants more than some cultivators are aware of.

When the weather begins to get warm in spring, some air should be left all night, to harden the plants before they are set out; a little must be left at first, and continue to increase it every night till they have full air, if the weather will allow of it. The time of setting them out in the open air, depends entirely on the weather. Sometimes they may be put out with safety by the middle of May; in other seasons not till the latter end: but they had better stay in a little too long, than be put out too soon. Calm cloudy weather is the best time for setting them out, when as sheltered a situation as possible should be chosen for them. The best time for shifting them in fresh pots, is early in spring ; some shift them before they are set out, and let them make fresh roots, while in the greenhouse, which is a very good plan, particularly for young or tender plants. We have found them succeed quite as well when shifted the latter end of summer; say August and the beginning of September; the balls of many plants might then be also reduced, so that smaller pots maybe used, by which means they will take up less room in the house : but they will require to be replaced in larger pots again in spring : the tribe of Geraniace^; in par-

ticular, may be treated in this manner: particularly such plants as have been cut back. If any of the woody plants are too tall, and require cutting back, it should be done early in spring, as soon as they begin to grow : then they have time to recover themselves, and make good bushy plants by autumn.

Cuttings require to be put in at various seasons, and in different situations, which will be explained under each genus. From Christmas to May, may be considered the best time for cuttings in general; but some will require to be put in at various seasons throughout the year, according to the state of the shoots, in the same manner as Stove Plants. Most of the young plants that are potted off in spring, will want shifting in larger pots in autumn.

While the plants are out they must be attended regularly with water. The best time for watering them in summer, is as late as possible in the afternoon ; then they have all the night to refresh themselves. If watered in the morning of a warm day, they will dry again almost immediately. Plants should not remain out too long in autumn, as they are liable to get too much wet, and the worms get in the pots. The middle of September should be the latest, but give them full air as long as the weather will permit. Seeds of greenhouse plants should be sown early in spring: the beginning of February is agood time, then the plants get strength before winter; small seeds, such as Rhododendron, Andromeda, and many others, should be sown early

in the year, the beginning of January, if the pots in which they are sown are set in the greenhouse, and early in February, if sown in the frames ; if left till summer, or late in spring, they will not come up so well, and many of the young plants will be liable to be killed with the heat. The sooner seedlings are potted off the better, as they will then not miss their moving.

In preparing mould for the plants, it should be chopped up with a spade altogether, turf and all, and not sifted as is the general practice, and a great reason of plants not succeeding; for by sifting it, all the stringy and rooty part of the mould is lost, which is certainly the best part of it, for it keeps the soil light in the pots, so that the roots can spread themselves regularly, which is not the case when sifted, for it then gets close together, and often bakes as hard as a brick; so that it is impossible for the roots to get through it; we cannot imagine how cultivators of plants, who have been in the habit of managing them for years, should not be able to see this; but still go on the old way of sifting their mould, and injuring the health of their plants; and if any person asks them why they do so, their excuse is, that it is the way they have always been accustomed to; and think it quite impossible to improve ; though a moment’s reasoning with themselves must make them see their error.

Many plants, particularly bulbous and tuberous rooted ones, that are arranged amongst the greenhouse plants, would succeed much better planted

out in a pit or frame, with a little covering in winter. Those from the Cape, New Holland, Mexico, and the temperate parts of South America, succeed very well in this way; some of them are even hardy enough to endure our winters in the open borders without protection, and the greater part will succeed well with the covering of a thick mat, or some litter, or a good covering of rotten tan, which may be removed when the frost is over; they should always be exposed to the air when the weather is mild. Many handsome shrubby and suffrutescent plants, that are generally treated as greenhouse plants, will also succeed well by the side of a wall, or in a sheltered situation, with the covering of a mat in severe frost, and to be exposed to the air when the weather is mild; we shall notice several of those in the following pages.

CONSERVATORY.

Conservatories are generally placed in Flower Gardens, in various situations, and of different forms and sizes, according to the taste of the proprietor; the form, size, or situation is of little consequence to the management of the plants, so that it has plenty of light and air; and can be well heated, when required, with flues, steam, or hot water, either of

which we consider of the same usefulness, if well set up, so that it can be soon heated; as it seldom requires fire, except in frosty weather, or when there has been a long continuance of wet or dark weather ; it will then want a little occasionally to dry up the damp that will arise in the house, and be injurious to the plants. The flues, or pipes, or whatever is used, should be placed under the paths, if possible, with iron gratings by the sides, to admit the heat; for if otherwise erected in the house, it disturbs the otherwise regular arrangement.

We cannot agree with the general rule, of planting out the various plants in a conservatory; as the fast growing plants soon overgrow and stifle the more delicate ones, which are in general the most valuable; so that in two or three years a great part of the most delicate and interesting plants are destroyed by those of strong growth ; and the strong growing ones are become so rude, that they are beyond management, so that the whole wants to be taken up, and replanted ; at the same time the soil is become exhausted, with the roots of those strong growing plants; and the whole will need to be replenished, otherwise the fresh planted ones will not succeed. All the conservatories that we ever saw planted out, has been quite unsightly in a few years, just a few of the strong plants remaining flourishing, and the smaller and more delicate ones dwindling to nothing, and numbers quite dead and gone.

The only conservatory we have ever seen that

continued for a great many years in beauty, and the beauty of which never diminished, while kept up with good management, was at the garden of the late J. J. Angerstein, Esq., of Woodlands, near Blackheath, at the time that the ingenious and excellent cultivator, Mr. David Stewart, was super-intendant there, with whom we were for two years, and had the management of the conservatory for a good part of that time. There, the only plants that were planted out, were a few large Camellias, of which there is no fear that they will over-run any others ; those were planted near the pillars, where they could not injure any of the other plants : the climbers were also planted out, and trained up the pillars, or other convenient places, where they grew luxuriantly, and were some or other of them always covered with bloom; in other parts, grape-vines were trained up, and produced annually an enormous crop of grapes.

The collection at that time consisted of the choicest and newest plants from China, New Holland, the Cape of Good Hope, and from other countries whose productions were fitting for a conservatory; amongst others was a large collection of the finest, most beautiful and expensive Heaths, which grew there to an amazing size, and were always covered with a great quantity of flowers, which were of a much larger size than they generally are ; some of them attained the size of small trees, such as E. versicolor, concinna, arborea, the different varieties of vestita, and several others; the arborea was a

tree large enough to bear any person in its branches,

and E. retorta, jasminiftora, ventricosa, daphnaflora, and others of that tribe, were as large as good size Currant bushes ; all the other sorts thrived in the same proportion; this we believe was owing to the particular goodness of the peat earth, which was plentiful in a field just by, as was also a pit of the finest white sand that we ever saw, in which the cuttings would strike root more freely than in any other we have ever used ; it was in this that we first succeeded in striking cuttings of Banksias, Proteas, and many other Proteaceous plants, and overcame the difficulty of striking the cuttings of any plant.

The whole of the plants in this conservatory, except the ones mentioned as planted out, were all grown in pots, of various sizes, according to the size of the plant, in the different soils suitable to each species : they were generally shifted once every season, when all hands were set at work to get through the job as quick as possible; one person was entirly employed in breaking potsherds, and placing them systematically over the holes at the bottom of the pot, which was a very essential point, as they were all to be plunged in sand ; and as they were so carefully drained at the bottom, the water always passed freely through them, so that there was no danger of their becoming sodden : the floor of the conservatory was paved with large flat stones, and a very large oblong clump ran through about half the middle part of the house,

but not in a straight line, as that would have appeared too formal; it therefore came out farther in some parts, and ran in at others, and the walk followed it, as that might be made any where, the whole of the floor being alike: another nearly circular clump was placed in each of the wings, with a clump also at each corner, and numerous others by the sides and at various places in the house, so that one end of the house could not be seen from the other, and it appeared as if walking in an evergreen flowery wood, the end of the house not being seen till come on all at once, which made it appear three times the length it really was.

All the clumps were formed of the white sand already mentioned, in which the whole of the pots were plunged; the largest plants in their proper places, the smaller ones to follow them, with occasionally a fine tall rare plant, or a plant in full bloom here and there as a starer: the plants with large and small foliage were also well intermixed, to cause variety; the Erice® were kept in clumps by themselves, also the Geraniace®, and Auran-tiace® or Orange tribe: the others were all intermixed irregularly, according to their form or size, so as to appear to the greatest advantage; and when they had grown out of place or size, the house was fresh arranged, and always arranged differently, to give a new appearance; and what plants wanted trimming or cutting, received it at the time; a succession of flowers of some sort or other were always coming forwards.

In summer the greater portion of the plants were set out in the open air, as other Greenhouse plants are; by that means they were kept from being drawn up, weak, and spoiled: this could not have been done, had they been planted out in the house: during that period, the space was occupied by plants from the Stoves, and other showy things, so that it was always set off with ornamental plants: the very largest and tallest being always left in. The whole of the Heaths, Diosmese, Proteaceae, and other plants that would not bear confinement, were always placed out: and after shifting towards the end of summer, the whole were taken back into the house, which was shut up close for a few days afterwards, until they had begun to make fresh roots, the balls being mostly shaved round a good deal in shifting, to allow the young roots to push out into the fresh soil: this also gave them a sort of check, which accounted for their flowering so freely.

Numerous new plants from .New Holland and the Cape flowered there for the first time in Europe; several species of Leptospermum, Melaleuca, Cal-listemon, Acacia, Casuarina, and the Fabricia laevigata, flowered there for the first time; and many plants produced their flowers there, that we have never seen flower before or since.

All those real advantages are lost in a Conservatory where the plants are planted out in beds, as their situation cannot be altered, neither can they be kept within bounds, and the greater part soon

become spoiled, the whole place appearing like a wilderness ; we would therefore advise our readers, if they wish to have a Conservatory, to arrange it in the way that we have mentioned : it will be the best method of keeping their plants in health, and having them handsome ; a much greater number and variety can also be cultivated, a greater number of flowers will be produced, and the plants will be always in a manageable state. Any Greenhouse plant will come to a sufficient size in a large pot, if treated in the way that we have here recommended ; to give the pots good drainage in the bottom, and to plunge them in sand, and to plant in the soil recommended under each genus. One of the finest and most beautiful climbers for a Conservatory, is the Lophospermum erubescens; there have also been many fine Conservatory plants introduced within these few years from Mexico, Chile, Peru, and various parts of South America: Captain King has lately brought some fine plants from Chile and the Straits of Magellan; and amongst them are two fine plants of Drimys Winteri, the true Winter Bark Tree; and Mr. Joseph Knight, of the King’s Road Nursery, Chelsea, has lately raised a great quantity of beautiful new plants from New Holland, he having purchased all the extensive collection brought from thence by Mr. William Baxter.

GREENHOUSE PLANTS.

A.

Acacia is the most ornamental genus of greenhouse plants in the winter season and early in spring, several New Holland species being in full flower from Christmas to April. They are mostly very hardy greenhouse plants, and easily managed. Mr. Burchell introduced several species from Africa, some of which are rather too tender for the greenhouse, but are hardy stove plants, and thrive best out of doors in summer. We have only seen one Cape species in flower, the A. horrida of De Candolle: (A. capensis of Bur-chell’s travels); its flowers are very large and sweet-scented, and not unlike A. nigricans, a New Holland species. New Holland and the Cape furnish us with most of the greenhouse species, except a few from America. The best soil for them is an equal quantity of loam and peat, and a good quantity of sand mixed with it; and the pots should be well drained with potsherds. Cuttings of most kinds will root pretty freely, taken off’ in the young wood and planted in sand, under a bell-glass, and plunged in a little bottom heat. The kinds that do not root

readily from cuttings may be increased by taking off roots, as large pieces as can be spared, and plant them in the same kind of soil as the old plants, with their points above the surface, when they should be plunged, in a little bottom heat. Most of the kinds might be propagated by that means.

Ac .en a is a genus belonging to the Rosace®, and consists of herbaceous, or, rather, suffrutescent plants. The tenderer species may be protected in winter in a frame, if room cannot be spared in the greenhouse. They thrive well in an equal quantity of loam and peat; and cuttings, taken off at a joint and planted in the same sort of soil, will root freely with no other protection than a close frame or hand-glass. There are several hardy species.

Achii.lea cegyptiaca is the only greenhouse species : it is easily managed, growing freely in a mixture of loam and peat, or any other light soil. It is readily increased from cuttings, in the same manner as the last genus.

Achyranthes will thrive in any light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, planted in the same kind of soil and placed in a close frame, will root readily.

Achyronia is a New Holland Papilionaceous genus : it thrives best in an equal proportion of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, covered with a bell-glass, and placed in a shady part in the green-

p 2

house, or propagating house, the glass to be wiped occasionally, that the dew settling on it may not occasion them to damp off, and they will soon strike root.

Acianthus is a New Holland Genus of Orchi-deas; its species succeed best in a mixture of very sandy loam and peat; they will thrive much better planted out in a pit, and covered up with mats or litter in severe frosty weather, and to be always exposed to the full air when the weather is mild : or if planted in a warm border in the open ground, and to be well covered in severe frosty weather, they will succeed quite as well; all that is wanting is to keep the frost from their roots.

Acicarpha is a curious genus belonging to Caly-cereae ; it is only worth keeping on account of its singularity, being possessed of little beauty: it succeeds well in any rich light soil, and may be raised from seeds; or young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed in a shady part of the greenhouse, will soon strike root.

Acmadenia is a genus divided from Diosma: its species succeed best in a sandy peat soil, with their pots well drained, that the moisture may pass off regularly; young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass, will root freely.

Acmena is a New Holland genus of Myrtaceae; the Eugenia elliptica of authors; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root freely in a pot of sand,

placed under a hand-glass: it makes a very handsome evergreen shrub, well suited for a greenhouse or conservatory, making a handsome appearance when covered with numerous bunches of pink-coloured berries.

Acrostichum is a genus of the Ferns ; the greenhouse species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat, and are increased by dividing them at the root, or by seed.

Acrotriche is a pretty New Holland genus of dwarf shrubby plants, belonging to Epacrideae ; they succeed well in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand ; and young cuttings root readily in pots of sand, under a bell-glass, in the same manner as Heaths.

Actinocarpus belongs to the family of Alisma-ceae. A. minor is a New Holland species, and requires to be grown in a pot of sandy peat, immersed in water; and is increased by seed.

Actjnotus is a singular and pretty genus, belonging to the Umbelliferae : it succeeds well in two-

O    7

thirds peat, and one-third sandy loam, and must be increased by seeds.

Adenandra is a genus belonging to the Diosmeae, and has been, till lately, ranked with Diosma. It consists of D. uniflora, speciosa, and fragrans, of the Botanical Magazine, and D. ama’tia and acuminata of Loddiges' Botanical Cabinet. It is a very natural genus, and easily recognized by its glandular anthers; we have found it succeed best in sandy peat; but some prefer mixing a p 3

little sandy loam with it. The young tender tops strike best, made into cuttings, and planted in a pot of sand, under a bell-glass : they do not require to be plunged in heat.

Adenocarpus is a Papilionaceous genus with glandular seed-pods ; to it belongs Cytisus folio-losiis, and several other nearly related species, the greater part of which will thrive well in the open borders, but are apt to be killed in very severe frost; they succeed well in any rich loamy soil, mixed with a little peat, and are readily increased by seeds, which in general are produced in abundance; or young cuttings, planted in sand under a bell-glass, are not difficult to root.

Adesmia is a Papilionaceous genus, related to Hedysarum; its species are chiefly annual or herbaceous, and mostly natives of South America ; an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat is the most proper soil for them; and they may be increased by seeds; or young cuttings, planted in sand, under a bell-glass, will root readily.

Adiantum is a genus of Ferns. Its species thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seed.

A ihn a is a genus nearly related to Nauclea, and belonging to Rubiaceae; its species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Agapanthus, or Blue African Lily, thrives well

in loam, with a little rotten dung mixed with it. Two or three distinct species have been till lately confounded under A. umbellatus. Mr. Loddiges has figured one under the name of A. minor; but it was described in Willd. enum. long before, under the specific title oi'pr&cox. They are readily increased by dividing them at the root, or by seed.

Agastachys is a New Holland genus, belonging to Proteacese ; it thrives best in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand ; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and plunged under a hand-glass, not in heat, will soon strike root.

Agathi;a, or Cape Aster, grows freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots, and placed in a shady situation, will soon strike root.

Agathelpis is a pretty Cape genus, belonging to Selagineae; its species thrive best in a mixture of two-thirds peat, and one-third sandy loam; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed in a shady situation, will root readily.

A g a t h o s m a is another genus divided from Diosma; to it belong all the species with close heads of flowers and ten petals, or, as some style them, five petals and five barren filaments. It is a very natural genus, and succeeds wrell in sandy peat: young cuttings root freely in sand, under a bell-glass, not plunged in heat.

p 4

Agave is the genus to which the large American Aloe, as it is generally called, belongs : it was formerly considered a great rarity to see one in flower, but of late years they have flowered more frequently. They thrive well in a rich loamy soil, and require but little water; they are increased by suckers from the root.

Ageratum is a genus belonging to the Compositas, and grows freely in a rich light soil; cuttings root freely in the same sort of soil, under a common hand-glass.

Agonis belongs to the Myrtaceae ; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat. There are now many species in our collections,, but we have never seen any of them in flower, but have seen dried native specimens; the flowers are produced in little close heads. Young cuttings root readily, planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass.

Aitonia is a pretty genus, which thrives well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; young cuttings will root in sand, under a bell-glass, plunged in heat. The cuttings must not be put in very close together, and the glass must be wiped frequently, as they are apt to damp off.

Aizoon is a genus of succulent plants belonging to the Ficoideae. The species are best cultivated in small pots, in a mixture of loam and lime rubbish, and require but little water. Cuttings root readily, but they should lay to dry a few

days after taking off, before they are planted, or they are apt to rot.

Albuca is a bulbous-rooted genus belonging to the Asphodeleae ; it consists of several species, which thrive well in a light loam, mixed with one third sand, and a little peat. They are increased by suckers from the old bulbs; or leaves, taken off with a scale from the bulb, will produce young plants.

Allantodia is a genus of the Ferns, which thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, and is increased by dividing at the root, or by seed.

Aloe is a curious and beautiful genus of succulent plants, which require but little water in winter; sandy loam, mixed with a little lime rubbish or gravel, suits them best; and they flower more abundantly by being exposed to the open air in summer. They are increased by suckers; or leaves, stripped off the plants and laid on a pot of mould, or planted shallow in it, will produce young plants.

Alomia is a genus of Compositae ; it thrives well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings root readily in the same sort of soil, or it may be increased by suckers from the root.

Alonsoa is a pretty genus of easy culture, thriving well in any rich light soil, and is readily increased by seeds or cuttings.

Aloysia is a genus belongingto the Verbenacea?, to which Verbena triphylla belongs. It is much esteemed for its Citron-scented leaves. It grows

freely in light rich soil, and is readily increased by cuttings.

Alsophila is a genus of Tree Ferns; they will grow freely in a mixture of two-thirds sandy loam, and the rest peat.

Alstrcemeria is a beautiful genus, which thrives best in a mixture of full one third sand, rather more than a third of turfy loam, and the rest turfy peat; several species are now in our collections, the greater part of which succeed very well in the open air, planted about six inches deep, by the side of a south wall, in sandy soil; they will grow there much stronger, and flower finer, than in the greenhouse; their leaves are also more glossy and conspicuous; we have had several species flower, and produce abundance of seeds, by the side of a wall in our garden. A. Simsii continued producing flower-stems last summer, from May till September. They are increased by dividing them at the root, or by seeds, which should be sown as soon as ripe, as they soon lose their vegetating principle.

Alternanthera belongs to Amaranthaceae: the greenhouse species thrive well in a rich light soil; and young cuttings root freely in the same sort of soil, placed in a shady situation.

ALVsiCARPUsis a Papilionaceousgenus, belonging to the tribe Hedysareae ; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass, will soon strike root.

Amaryllis is a fine genus, and its species, and numerous hybrid productions, are now almost without number ; like the stove species, we find them succeed best in about one half of light turfy loam, rather more than one third sand, and the rest turfy peat: the only use of the peat is to keep the loam open, and if the loam should be very close and heavy, a greater quantity of peat and sand is required to mix with it, being careful to drain the pots well with potsherds, that the roots may not be sodden with too much moisture; as soon as the leaves begin to die away, and the bulbs become dormant, the water must be discontinued, and the bulbs may be turned out of the pots, and laid on a shelf to dry, till they show flower, or begin to grow afresh; they must then be fresh potted, and watered regularly; they are increased by offsets from the bulbs.

Ambrosia belongs to the Ambrosiaceee tribe of Composite; the perennial species thrive well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed on a shelf in the greenhouse, will soon strike root.

Amellus Lychnitis is a very handsome Cape plant belonging to Composite; it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in a pot of mould, set under a hand-glass.

Ammocharis is a genus separated from Amaryllis and Brunsvigia by Mr. Herbert, to it belong A. falcata and coranica; they are generally treated as greenhouse bulbs, and require a great deal of

attention to bring them into flower: the best way is to keep them warm, and supply them well with water when in a free growing state; and when they have done growing, to keep them quite dry for a considerable time; they should then be shifted into fresh earth, and placed on a moist heat, and they are then likely to produce flowers. A plant of A. falcata, and one of Brunsvigia Josephines, were planted out in an open border, at the front of the greenhouse at the Nursery of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, at Fulham, in the summer of 1828 ; the bulbs were planted deep, and they stood both the last winters without the least protection : the winter of 1828-1829 they had not a single leaf injured, though the leaves of the Belladonna Lily, that grew by the side of them, were all destroyed: the last, though a very severe winter, the bulbs were not at all injured, and have been growing exceedingly strong the last summer; and we have no doubt but they will produce strong umbels of flowers next summer. We consider this one of the best plans for cultivating most of the Cape bulbs, by making a nice bed, of an equal mixture of light rich loam, peat, and sand, and plant the bulbs in it a good depth, so that the frost may not easily reach them ; and in severe weather the bed may be covered with a little rotten tan, and a mat laid on it, but always exposing it when the weather is mild : we have grown several of the more common kinds in our garden for several years, where they have

flowered very well, with no other protection in winter than a single mat thrown over them: many other bulbs and tubers from Mexico, Chili, and Peru, we have grown in the same situation, several of which have flowered and seeded with us.

Amygdalus orizntalis, or Silvery-leaved Almond, is deserving a place in the greenhouse, as it will not thrive, but is often killed, if exposed to the open air in winter. It thrives well in a rich loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit it very well. It is increased by budding on the common Almond or Plum stocks; or cuttings, taken off at a joint, as soon as the plant has finished its growth, and before they get too ripe, will root freely in sand, placed under a handglass, without bottom heat.

Anabasis belongs to the Chenopodeae; its species are nearly hardy ; they grow well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike root readily, under a bell-glass, in sand.

Anacampseros is a succulent genus belonging to the Portulaceae. The species grow freely in a sandy loam mixed with a little lime rubbish, and require but little water. Cuttings root readily, but should be laid to dry a few days before being planted. Leaves taken off close to the plants, and laid to dry a few days, and then planted, will root and shoot out young plants at their base.

An a den i a is a pretty New Holland genus, belonging to Proteaceae; the best soil for it is an

equal mixture of light turfy loam, peat, and sand, and the pots to be well drained with potsherds, that the moisture may pass off readily. Cuttings, ripened at the base, taken off at a joint, and planted in pots of sand, placed under a handglass, will strike root: but they must be planted thinly in the pots, or they will be apt to damp off.

Anagallis is a pretty genus belonging to the Primulaceae. It grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat, or any light soil, and is readily increased by cuttings.

Anagyris, or Bean Trefoil, will do under the protection of a frame, if it is not allowed room in the greenhouse ; a mixture of loam and peat is a very proper soil for it; and young cuttings will root in sand, under a bell-glass.

Andersonia is a pretty genus belonging to the Epacrideae; its species grow freely in a sandy peat soil, with the pots well drained; and care should be taken not to over water them, as they are very liable to get sodden, when they seldom recover. The very young tops put in for cuttings, under a bell-glass, in sand, will root readily. When first potted off, they should be put, singly, in small thumb-pots, kept close in a frame for a few days, and hardened to the air by degrees.

Andromeda belongs to the Ericeae; there are now several fine greenhouse species in the collections ; they require to be grown in a sandy peat soil; and cuttings not too young, should be planted in sand, under a bell-glass, where they strike

root readily. A. buxifolia, with its rose-coloured flowers, is very handsome.

Andryala is a genus of the Composite. It thrives well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely under a common hand-glass.

Aneilema belongs to the Commelineee; its species thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be readily increased from seeds, which ripen in abundance.

Anemone capensis of Decandolle (Atragene capen-sis of Linnaeus) grows best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat. Care must be taken not to let it have too much water, when not in a growing state. It often produces perfect seeds, by which young plants are readily obtained. It will also strike root from cuttings, but they are sparingly produced; they strike best under a hand-glass, in the same kind of soil.

Anesorhiza is a genus belonging to Umbelliferae, natives of the Cape; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and may be raised from seeds.

Angianthus is a New Holland genus belonging to Composite; it grows freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and may be increased by seeds.

Angophora is a handsome genus of Myrtaceae; its species thrive well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; but they do not flower until they attain a considerable size; they should

therefore be raised from cuttings, which would occasion them to flower of a smaller size; cuttings not quite ripened, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will strike root, but they are generally a considerable time in rooting.

Anguillaria belongs to the Melanthace®, and thrives well in an equal mixture of light turfy loam, peat, and sand ; they will succeed as well, or better, in a pit or frame, than they will in the greenhouse; or if planted in a border, and managed in the way recommended for the Cape bulbs, it will suit them very well, requiring no covering, except in severe frosty weather.

Anigozanthos is a curious genus belonging to the Haemodorace®. It grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and requires a good deal of water. It is readily increased by dividing it at the root.

Anisanthus is a handsome genus of Cape bulbs, to which the Antholyxa Cunonia belongs; it requires precisely the same treatment as the next genus, and the other Cape bulbs.

Anomatheca is a genus belonging to the Irideae. It thrives best in a mixture of loam, sand, and decayed leaves, or a little peat mould may be mixed with it. When it has done flowering, it should be kept dry, or the bulb is apt to rot, or grow at an improper time; it will also do very well planted out by the side of a south wall, in a sandy soil; the bulbs must then be planted

about six inches deep, to be out of the reach of frost, and a little dry litter may be thrown on the ground in very severe weather; it may be increased by offsets from the bulbs, or by seeds.

Anopteuus belongs to the Escalloneae; it thrives well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings nearly ripened, will soon strike root in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass.

Anthericum belongs to the Asphodeleae. Several of the species are succulent; some of them are shrubby, the others tuberous or bulbous. They grow best in an equal mixture ef loam, peat, and sand, with the pots well drained : the greater part are natives of the Gape : the tuberous kinds should have no water when not in a growing state. The shrubby kinds strike root freely from cuttings; and most of the species will produce perfect seeds.

Anthocercis is a curious and pretty genus, belonging to Solaneae. It grows freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings root readily, under a bell-glass, in sand.

Antiiolyza is a genus belonging to the Irideae, which thrives well in a mixture of loam and sand with an equal quantity of decayed leaves or peat soil; and, like the rest of the family, they will succeed well by the side of a south wall, or a warm border, in a sandy soil; the bulbs being large, they may be planted full eight inches deep, so as to be out of the reach of frost; and a little dry litter or a mat should be thrown over them,

Q

in very severe weather; or some rotten tan, if it could be procured; but the best plan for growing all the plants of this family, such as Gladiolus, Ixia, Babiana, Watsonia, Sparaxis, Moraea, &c. is a pit built about two bricks thick, so as to keep out the frost, and to be covered with lights and mats in severe weather, but to be exposed to the air when the weather is fine and mild; the lights will also require to be put on when there is a superabundance of wet, or the bulbs will be likely to get rotten ; they require no water when not in a growing state; and may be increased by offsets from the bulbs, or by seed.

Antiiospermum, or Amber-tree, thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike root readily.

Anthyleis is a pretty Papilionaceous genus, which thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat. Most of the species produce perfect seeds, by which they are readily increased. Young cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in sand, are not difficult to root; the glasses must be kept wiped, or the dew is apt to make them mouldy, which destroys them.

Antirrhinum molle and Asarina grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass. They may be protected from the frost in a frame, if not allowed room in the greenhouse.

Aotus is a pretty Papilionaceous genus from New Holland, which thrives best in an equal mixture

of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily, under a bell-glass, in sand ; it also produces seeds.

Aphanochilus belongs to the Labiatse ; its species are scarcely worth cultivating, except in a botanic garden ; they will grow freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, in a shady situation, will soon strike root.

Ap me lex is is a handsome genus belonging to Composite, nearly related to Helichrysum; the flowers of the different species are amongst those termed everlasting, as their colours are preserved a long time after drying; the foliage of the whole of the species is very slender, resembling needles, or the leaves of Pines; they succeed best in a sandy peat soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, with a bell-glass placed over them, root readily.

Apicra is a genus divided from Aloe; its species succeed well in a mixture of old brick or lime rubbish, mixed with the same quantity of sandy loam, and they require but little water, when not in a free growing state; they are increased by suckers, which should lay to dry a few days before planting.

Aponogeton is a bulbous genus of water plants, which grow freely in a pot or tub of water, planted in a small pot of loam and peat; and are increased by offsets from the bulbs, or by seed.

Araucaria may be termed the noblest genus

Q 2

of plants with which we are acquainted ; A. im-bricata, in particular, is certainly one of the grandest plants known. It will thrive well in the open air, with the protection of a mat or two, in very severe weather, and when got pretty large, will, no doubt, be perfectly hardy. A. brasiliensis will only thrive in the greenhouse. A. cxcelsa, or Norfolk Island Pine, is also a beautiful tree, but will not do without the protection of a greenhouse. Nor will A. Cunninghamii, a new species lately introduced from New Holland. An equal mixture of sandy loam and peat will suit them very well; and cuttings may be rooted, though with difficulty, taken off at a joint in ripened wood, and planted in a pot of sand, which must be put under a hand-glass, in the propagating house, but not plunged in heat.

Arbutus canariensis is a beautiful and free-flowering greenhouse shrub, and particularly well adapted for a conservatory. A. andrachnt is sometimes grown as a greenhouse plant, but is seldom injured by our winters in the open air, if planted in a sheltered situation : it will grow and flower well if kept in a pot, and protected from the frost in a deep frame, without artificial heat; the lights only to be put on in severe weather. A. phillyreafolia is a pretty little shrub, but is only in few collections : the flowers of it we have not yet seen. A. laurifolia has also been lately introduced from Mexico, and some new species from the north-west coast of North America.

The best soil for them is two thirds peat and one third loam. They are readily increased by budding or in-arching on A. Unedo; or from layers; also from seeds, when they can be procured.

Arctopus echinatus is aCape plant, belonging to the Umbelliferae; it grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and is increased by seeds.

Arctotheca repens is also a native of the Cape, belonging to the family of the Composite. An equal mixture of loam and peat will suit it well; and cuttings root readily, under a hand-glass, in the open air.

Arctotis is a genus nearly allied to the last, and requires much the same treatment; there are numerous very handsome species. The dwarf species might be increased by dividing them at the root; the shrubby ones, from cuttings, planted in the ground, under hand-glasses.

Ardisia is a pretty genus: the only greenhouse species are A. ercelsa and A. lentiginosa. A mixture of an equal quantity of loam and peat suits them very well; and cuttings not too ripe will strike root, planted in sand, and placed under a hand-glass. They sometimes ripen fruit, from which young plants are readily produced.

Arduina is a pretty little Cape genus, scarcely different from Carissa. It thrives well in an equal mixture of peat and loam; and cuttings root freely, under a bell-glass, in sand.

Arenaria, or Sandwort, belongs to the Cary-ophylleae. Most of the species are hardy, or only Q 3

requiring the protection of a frame : the few that need a greenhouse thrive best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily, planted in the ground, under handglasses.

Arethusa bulbosa is a pretty Orchideous plant, which grows best in a mixture of one third loam and two thirds peat: it should be kept moist, as it grows in swamps in its native country. It may be increased by seeds, which should be sown as soon as ripe.

Akiste a is a pretty genus belonging to the Irideae. Most of the species thrive best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat. A. capitata grows best in all peat. They are readily increased by dividing them at the root, or by seeds.

Aristolociiia is a curious genus of climbing plants, whose flowers somewhat resemble a horn; the species make good climbers for a conservatory, being free growers, and requiring but little care. A mixture of an equal quantity of loam and peat is a proper soil for them ; and cuttings root freely, planted under a hand-glass.

Ariiacacha belongs to the Umbelliferse; this root was supposed to be superior to all other vegetables ; but it now appears to be of no use whatever, a good Parsnep being worth a thousand of them ; the roots require to be grown in a greenhouse or frame, in rich light soil.

Artemisia, or Wormwood. Of this genus, very few species require the protection of a greenhouse,

most of them being hardy, or only wanting to be kept in a frame in severe weather. A mixture of loam and peat suits them very well; and cuttings strike root readily, planted under a handglass.

Arthkopodium is a genus belonging to the Asphodelete, which grows freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing it at the root, or from seed.

AscLEPiAs.or Swallow-wort. Most of the species truly belonging to this genus are hardy plants; the few that require the greenhouse thrive best in two thirds peat and one third loam ; and cuttings root readily, planted in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass : they maybe also raised from seeds, which are generally produced in considerable quantities.

Ascyrum is nearly allied to Hypericum, and belongs to the Hypericinaj. It thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and is readily increased by cuttings, taken off in the young-wood, and planted under a hand-glass.

Aspalathus, at present, consists of an heterogeneous mass of species, very different from each other, both in habit and character, and will require hereafter to be divided into different generic groups; they will all grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in sand under bell-glasses, will strike root freely, if the glasses are wiped occasionally, otherwise they are very liable to damp Q 4

off. Some species ripen seeds freely, by which they are readily produced.

Asparagus isa genus consisting chiefly of climbing shrubs, some of which produce handsome flowers, and may be reckoned ornamental greenhouse climbers : they will grow freely in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat, and are readily increased by cuttings, or by dividing the roots. Cuttings root best under a hand-glass without bottom heat.

Aspidium is a genus of the Ferns; most of the species are hardy plants; the greenhouse kinds grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and are increased by dividing them at the root, or by seeds.

Asplenium is another genus of Ferns; most of the species are either hardy, or stove plants; the greenhouse kinds require the same treatment as the last genus.

Astartea is a genus belonging to Myrtaceae ; it succeeds well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, with a bell-glass over it, will soon strike root.

Astelma is a beautiful genus belonging to Composite ; its species succeed best in very sandy peat, mixed with a little sandy loam ; the pots must be well drained with potsherds broken small, as their roots are so small, that they soon become rotten if the moisture does not soak off readily; I he moisture should also be kept from the leaves as much as possible, particularly in winter, as the

leaves are of a cottony surface, and are apt to rot if the moisture remains on them; cuttings of some of the sorts root readily in pots of peat soil, others are more difficult to strike root, but the greater part seed freely ; the seed should be sown early in spring; February is a good time.

Astephanus is a climbing Cape genus, belonging to Asclepiadeaj; its species grow freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; young cuttings root readily in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on a little heat.

Aster is a genus which consists chiefly of North American herbaceous plants, but there are also several greenhouse shrubs belonging to it, from New Holland and the Cape: they are mostly pretty flowering plants, and of easy culture ; a mixture of sandy loam and peat suits them best; and cuttings root readily in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass, without bottom heat.

Astranthus belongs to Homalineae ; it succeeds best in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, on a little heat, will root freely.

Astroloma is a handsome New Holland genus belonging to the Epacrideae, whose pretty scarlet flowers are generally admired; and being low bushy-growing plants they take but little room; and are therefore desirable for all small collections, thriving best in an equal mixture of sandy

loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily, under a bell-glass, in sand.

Astrotricha is a New Holland genus, belonging to Umbelliferae; its species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings may be rooted in pots of sand, under a hand-glass.

Atalanthus belongs to the Cichoreae tribe of Composite; its species succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass.

Athanasia is a genus belonging to the Compo-sitae, and consists chiefly of Cape shrubs, which thrive well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass.

Athrixia is a pretty Cape genus belonging to the Composite ; it thrives best in two-thirds sandy peat, and one-third loam ; and young cuttings, planted in sand, under a bell-glass, will soon strike root.

Atraphaxis belongs to the natural order of the Polygonete, and is nearly related to Rumex; the species are not handsome plants, and are only fit for general collections : light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat, suits them well; and cuttings strike root freely under a hand-glass.

Atriplex is a genus belonging to the Chenopo-deae; the greenhouse species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike readily under a common hand-glass.

Atropa frutescens grows freely in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass.

Audouinia belongs to the Bruniaceae, and is the Diosma capitata of authors ; the best soil for it is a light sandy peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass, will strike root readily.

Aijlax is a pretty genus belonging to the Protea-ceae, which thrives best in a very sandy loam, with a great many potsherds broken small at the bottom of the pot, to let the water drain off' freely, as they frequently get too much water, which makes the mould sodden, and stagnates their growth: ripened cuttings taken off at a joint, and planted in a pot of sand, will strike root, if placed under a hand-glass, in the propagating house, and the glass to be occasionally left oft', an hour or two at a time, to give them air, and keep them from damping, which should be done in a morning before the sun has much power, or it will make them flag and injure them; plants are readily raised from seeds, which should be sown in a mixture of two thirds loam and one third sand: as soon as they come up, they should be planted off in small pots, in the same kind of soil, as they are apt to die if left too long in the seed-pot.

Azalea indica is a beautiful greenhouse species. Several line varieties are now in our collections; they thrive best in a sandy peat, and the pots to be well drained with small pieces of potsherds : they should be set in an airy part of the greenhouse in winter, and great care must be taken not to overwater them. In summer they should be exposed to the open air, but not in a very sunny situation. A. sinensis is another beautiful new species lately introduced, and requires the same treatment as A. indica. Young cuttings taken off close to the plants, and planted in pots of sand, will root readily, if plunged in heat, under a bell-glass. A. indica is another connecting link between Rhododendron and Azalea; we now consider them no more than sections of one genus, which must be Rhododendron.

B.

Babiana is a pretty bulbous genus, belonging to the Irideae; all the known species have plaited leaves, not unlikethe leaflets of some of the Palms: they thrive best in a mixture of sand, loam, and peat; and when in a growing state, they require a moderate supply of water; but after they have done flowering they need no more till they are repotted, which should be done in October, when they should be kept in as cold a place as possible, only to be protected from frost, till they have made fresh roots and nearly filled the pots; then they may be brought forward in a little more heat, and they will flower strong. The account given under

Antholyza is also suitable to the present genus, which would succeed well in a pit, filled with an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand; and to be covered in severe weather, or when there was too much wet. They will also do well planted by a south wall, so that they are planted about six inches deep, out of the reach of frost, and to be covered with a little dry litter, or a mat in very severe weather: we have found them succeed well by that means. They are readily increased by offsets from the bulbs, or by seeds.

BACCHARis.or Groundsel T ree, belongs to the Composite ; the greenhouse kinds thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat, and only require to be protected from frost. Cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Ba2Ckia is a pretty New Holland genus belonging to the Myrtaceae: the species grow freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and only need protection from frost in winter. Young cuttings will root readily, planted in sand, under bell-glasses.

Balsamita belongs to the Composite: it grows well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike root freely in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass.

Banksia isa very handsome and interesting genus belonging to the Proteaceae ; numerous species of which have been lately introduced from New Holland by Mr. W. Baxter ; and many of which are now flourishing at the Nursery of Mr. Knight, in the King’s-road; several of which have a verydis-tinct appearance from the species already describ ed: the best way to grow the species well is to make a mixture of one third peat, one third loam, and one third sand. The pots must be well drained, which should be done in the following manner : place a piece of potsherd about half way over the hole at the bottom of the pot, then lay another piece against it, that it may be hollow, afterwards put some smaller pieces all round them, and some more, broken very small, on the top of these. All plants belonging to the Proteaceae should be drained in the same manner, as the roots are very fond of running amongst the broken potsherds; and there is not so much danger of their being overwatered ; care must be taken not to let them flag for want of water, as they seldom recover if allowed to get very dry; they should also be placed in an airy part of the greenhouse when in doors, as nothing is more beneficial to them than a free circulation of air. Cuttings are generally supposed to be difficult to root, but they will root readily if properly managed : let them be well ripened before they are taken off; then cut them at a joint, and plant them in pots of sand, without shortening any of the leaves, except on the part that is planted in the sand, where they should be taken off quite close ; the less depth they are planted in the pots the better, if they only stand firm when the sand is well closed round them; then place them under hand-glasses in the propagating house, but not plunge them in heat; the glasses must be frequently taken off', to give them

air and dry them, or they are apt to damp off; when they are rooted, the sooner they are potted oft’ in little pots the better, as the sand is liable to canker their roots if left too long in it: when potted off they should be placed in a close frame, but not on heat, as a bottom heat will destroy their roots, when they must be hardened to the air by degrees. Plants raised in this way have better roots, grow faster, and flower sooner, than plants raised from seeds : in raising them from seeds they should be sown in the same kind of soil as the plants are grown in, and placed in the greenhouse, or if it is in summer they will come up sooner if placed out in the open air; they will soon make their appearance; when they should be potted off in small pots, for if left in the seed-pots too long, they are apt to die, and are more difficult to move with safety. Another plan, rather superior to the above, is to make up a bed of dung, sufficiently wide to allow two handglasses abreast to be placed on it, which must remain till well settled, and the heat beginning to decline; on this should be laid, at first, a layer of mould, of an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand, about six inches in depth ; on this must be placed a layer of sand, about four inches deep, on which the glasses must be placed, and the cuttings planted under them in the same manner as those planted in pots; the whole of the Proteaceae may be struck in this way: the best time for planting cuttings of Proteaceae is in autumn,when

the shoots are well ripened, or early in spring, just as they are beginning to push : most of the hard-wooded greenhouse plants may be rooted in the same manner; such as Pittosporum, Trista-nia, Callistemon, Ilex, Viburnum odoratissum, and all other plants of the same habits.

Barosma is a natural genus belonging to the Ru-taceae, some time since divided from Diosma by Wendland ; to it belongs D. serratifolia, and several other nearly related species: they thrive best in sandy peat; and cuttings strike root readily, taken off in ripened wood, and planted in sand, under a bell-glass.

Bartholin a is a curious Orchideous genus from the Cape, which thrives best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and requires but little water when not in a growing state.

Bauera is a pretty New Holland genus, which flowers nearly all the year through; its species are very desirable for the greenhouse or conservatory, as they are hardy greenhouse plants, and easily managed ; an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for them; and young-cuttings root readily in the same kind of soil, under a bell-glass.

Beaufortia is a splendid genus belongingto the Myrtaceae; its species are desirable for every collection of greenhouse plants; they are very suitable for a conservatory, being free growers, and abundant flowerers; the best soil for them is two thirds peat, and one third sandy loam; and cut-

tings taken from nearly ripened wood, strike root freely, in sand, under a bell-glass.

Befari a isa beautiful genus belonging to the Rho-doraceae, and thrives best in sandy peat: it may be increased by layers; or young cuttings, planted in sand, under a bell-glass, in a little heat, will strike root.

Begonia is a genus of plants with unequal leaves, the greater part of them being oblique at the base; the greenhouse species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and may be increased by cuttings planted in pots in the same sort of soil, placed in a shady situation, or by offsets from the root.

Belis lanceolata is the plant generally known in the gardens by the name of Pimis lanceolata, and has been unnecessarily published lately, under the name of Cunninghamia, under the pretended idea that Belis was likely to be confounded with Beilis ; but there is certainly very little danger of that; if there were, there is a number of genera will require to be altered on the same grounds, the sound of which are much nearer alike than Belis and Beilis: this plant forms a most beautiful tree for a conservatory, and is hardy enough to stand our severest winters in the open air with a slight covering; a mixture of two thirds sandy loam, and a third peat, is a proper soil for it; and cuttings nearly ripened, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Belladonna isa genus of the Amaryllideae, suc-

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ceeding well in a mixture of loam, peat, and sand, and are increased by offsets from the bulbs, or by seeds: they will all succeed well in the open ground, if the bulbs are planted six or eightinches deep, in a light dry soil, without the least protection ; they will then flower more freely, much stronger,and theflowerswillbe of abrighter colour.

Berberis belongs to the Berberidea;; the greenhouse species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and some of them are very handsome : cuttings, planted in sand, under a handglass, with their leaves not shortened, will strike root; they may also be increased by budding, or inarching on the common sorts, or by layers.

Berchemia belongs to the Rhamneae; the greenhouse species succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Berckijeya is a curious Cape genus belonging to the Composite; its species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in the common soil.

Bign on i a,or Trumpet-flower,is a handsome genus, hereafter to be divided into several genera: most of the species are climbing plants,and require room to show themselves to perfection : an equal mixture of loam and peat suits them well; and young cuttings root freely under a hand-glass, in heat.

Billardiera is a climbing genus belonging to the Pittosporeae: its species are desirable as climbers for a conservatory, especially B. longiflora, which

is a fast grower and an abundant flowerer; and when in fruit, its fine blue berries make a handsome appearance: they thrive well in an equal portion of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a bell-glass : they may also be raised from seeds, which are produced in abundance.

BlvEki a is a genus belonging to theEriceae,and hardly different from Erica : it thrives only in sandy peat soil; and young cuttings will root in sand, under a bell-glass, in the greenhouse, or in a close frame in a shady situation.

BLANDFORDiAisabeautiful genus belonging to the Hemerocallideae : there are only three species at present known. B. grandiftora has produced its flowers at the Nursery of Mr. Colvill, where it was planted out in the conservatory; it has much the habit of B. nobilk, but is a strongergrowing plant, with jagged leaves; the Aletris punicea of La Billardiere is another species; they all grow freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and are increased by suckers from the roots, or from seeds.

Blechnum is a genus of Ferns: the greenhouse kinds grow freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and are increased by dividingthem at the root, or by seeds.

B leph a ri s belongs to the Acanthaceae ; its species succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat; and youngcuttings planted in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Bletia hyacinthina is a beautiful Orchideous spe-

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cies, generally cultivated in the hot-house, but it thrives much better in the greenhouse, and flowers a great deal finer, and lasts longer in bloom. It grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and is readily increased by dividing at the roots.

B(ehmeria is a genus belonging to the Urticeae, or the Nettle tribe. It thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass.

Boldoa belongs to the Nyctagineae; its species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in the same sortofsoil, and placed under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Borbonia is a Cape genus belonging to the Papi-lionaceae. It thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings strike readily, under a bell-glass, in sand.

Boron i a is a beautiful New Holland genus, which flowers nearly all the year. Several species are now in our collections; they all thrive bestin sandy peat, with their pots well drained with broken potsherds; and may be propagated by layers, or cuttings taken off at a joint and planted in sand, under a bell-glass, and then set in a frame, will strike root, if properly managed : the glass must be taken off occasionally to dry them, as they are very liable to damp off.

Bosea yervamora, or Golden-rod Tree, grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings strike root readily, in sand, under a handglass, without heat.

Bossi.sa is a beautiful Papilionaceous genus : its species thrive best in an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand. The pots must be well drained with broken potsherds, as nothing injures them more than too much water. Cuttings not too ripe will strike root, if planted in sand under a bell-glass, not too close together, as they are apt to damp: when rooted, they must be potted oft in little pots, and kept in a close frame, and hardened to the air by degrees.

Botryceras belongs to the Proteacea;; itsucceeds best in a mixture of loam, peat, and sand ; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand under a handglass, will strike root readily.

Bouvardia is a beautiful genus belonging to the Rubiaceae. The Mexican species are hardy greenhouse plants, and flower a great part of the year.

B.Jacquini has acute pubescent leaves, and B. tri-phylla shorter and rounder, smooth shining leaves; the pubescent one is much the hardiest, and is the easiest increased; but the smooth one is the finest flower and brightest scarlet. The readiest way of propagating them is by pieces of the roots, planted in a mixture of loam and peat, and placed in a warm situation; they will soon begin to grow, and will be pretty plants in a short time. B. versicolor is more tender than the former, requiring a warm greenhouse, or cool part of the hothouse in winter to keep it in health : it thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cu t-r 3

tings root readily in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass, in heat.

Boviea is a Cape genus, related to Aloe ; and like that tribe, its species succeed best in an equal mixture of sandy loam, and old lime and brick rubbish, requiring but little water in winter; and the pots must be well drained with broken potsherds, that the moisture may pass off readily: they may be increased by young suckers from the root.

Brabejum is a Cape genus belonging to the Pro-teaceae : it grows best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and ripened cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass.

BRACHYi./ENAisa genus divided from Baccharis by Mr. Brown : to it belongs B. neriifolia: it grows readily in any common garden soil, or a mixture of loam and peat suits it well; and ripened cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Brachysema is a beautiful Papilionaceous genus, and its species make handsome climbers for a conservatory or greenhouse ; they thrive well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and are readily increased by layers; or cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in sand, will root freely; they also produce perfect seeds, by which they are readily increased.

B randesi a belongs to the Amaranthaceae; the fru-tescent species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily in the same sort of soil under a hand-glass, or without a glass in a shady part of the greenhouse.

Brogniartia belongs to the Ceesalpineae tribe of Leguminosae ; it grows freely in two thirds sandy loam, and one third peat: and young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses in the same sort of soil, strike root readily.

Bkugmaxsia belongs to the Solaneae, and consists of the shrubby species of Datura; they grow freely in any rich light soil, but require good room to flower in perfection ; a large plant in a conservatory when covered with flowers, makes a grand appearance. Cuttings, planted in mould under a hand-glass, with a slight heat, will soon strike root: a plant of it turned out in summer in a sheltered warm border, will sometimes produce a great quantityof flowers,andmake a superb appearance.

Brunia is a pretty Cape genus; its species are pretty bushy shrubs, withHeath-like leaves, which are handsomest while young. The flowers are not so showy as in many other genera; but some of them are very elegant. A sandy peat soil suits thembest, with a moderatesupplyof water; and youngcuttings,planted in sand underabell-glass, will strike root freely.

B run mc hi a is a genus belonging to the Polvgo-neae ; it is a climbing shrub, and thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Brunsvigia is a beautiful bulbous genus belonging to the Amaryllideee ; some of the bulbs grow to a great size, and require large pots to have them thrive and flower in perfection; or if r 4

planted out in the open borders in spring, there will be a better chance of their flowering, taking the bulbs up again in autumn, and keeping them dry through the winter; or the best way to succeed well with them, is to have a pit built on purpose, so as to be occasionally covered with the lights, to keep off too much wet, and to be covered close in severe weather, as they cannot bear the frost; the mould must be made for them of full one third sand, more than one third of turfy loam,, and the rest peat; all well mixed together, but not chopped too small, as the roots run better through it for being rough and hollow. When in full growth and flower, they require a frequent supply of water, but none while dormant; all the greenhouse species of Amaryllideaj will succeed best in this way. A bulb of B. Josephitice has stood the two last severe winters in a border at the front of the greenhouse, without the least protection ; it was of course planted deep : but it kept its leaves green all through the frost, and grew very strong in summer; that and Ammoc/iaris falcata both stood the winters well, and will doubtless flower freely, when perfectly established.

Bryonia is a genus belonging to the Cucurbitacese, or the Gourd tribe. Some of them are handsome climbers in summer, but die down to the root, or lose their leaves, in winter. Sandy loam is the best soil for them; and young cuttings, planted in the same kind of mould, will root readily, if placed under a hand-glass, in a little bottom heat.

Bubon belongs to the Umbelliferous tribe, and is only worth cultivating where there are general collections : it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, and planted under a hand-glass in sand, will root readily; they may also be raised from seeds.

Bucholzia belongs to the Amaranthaceae; its species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Buddlea belongs to the Scrophularineae: there are now several species of the genus in our collections; many of them are nearly hardy, requiring only to be protected from severe frosts; they are abundant flowerers, and the flowers are very fragrant: they thrive well in any rich light soil, and cuttings root freely, planted under a common hand-glass, in mould.

Bulbine belongs to the Asphodeleae, and consists of the hairy-stamened species of Anthericum ; they are all of a succulent nature, and require to be grown in a very sandy soil; some of them are suffrutescent, but the greater number have large fleshy roots, so that they require very little water, except when in a free growing state, or when the flowers are coming forward ; the pots require to be well drained with broken potsherds, that the moisture may pass off readily: the suffrutescent species grow readily from cuttings; the tuberous-rooted ones must be raised from seeds.

Bumalda trifolia grows well in an equal portion

of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings strike root readily under a hand-glass, in sand.

Bumelia belongs to the Sapoteac; the greenhouse species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; but the greater part will stand our winters in the open air; cuttings scarcely ripened, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will strike root; several of the species have very handsome foliage.

BupiioNEis a handsome bulbous genus, belonging to the Amaryllideae; its species require nearly the same treatment as Brunsvigia, but are more tender, and cannot bear much moisture, except when in a free growing state; the bulbs are said to be very poisonous; andifwounded,aquantityofthick clammy juice exudes from them, which will occasion them to rot, if not well dried afterwards: this accounts for their present scarcity, as there have been great numbers introduced within afew years; they seldom produce flowers with us, which we believe is owing to the treatment they receive : they also are furnished with large fleshy roots, when in a wild state; those are chiefly dead and dried up on their passage; so that it takes a considerable time before they are supplied with others to take their place ; the same soil recommended for Brunsvigia will suit them well, and it is probable they may be quite as hardy.

Buphthalmum is a genus belonging to the Composite. The greenhouse species thrive well in a loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Bupleurum is a genus belonging to the Umbelli-ferae. The greenhouse kinds grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass.

Burchardia is a pretty genus belonging to Me-lanthaceae ; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand ; and will succeed very well in a frame, or in a warm border, with a slight covering in frosty weather.

Burchellia is a beautiful genus from the Cape, but will not succeed well in the greenhouse, except it be kept up to a good heat in winter.—See Stove Plants, page 42.

Burmannia is a genus of water-plants, that may be grown in the greenhouse, in a pan or tub of water, in a peat soil at the bottom.

Bursari a spinosa is a pretty plant, native of New Holland. It is very desirable for a greenhouse or conservatory, being an abundant flowerer, and very showy when covered all over with its elegant little white flowers ; an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for it, and young cuttings are not difficult to root in sand, under a bell-glass.

Burtonia is a pretty Papilionaceous genus, also from New Holland, and its species require more than ordinary treatment to keep them in good health: an equal mixture of very sandy loam and peat is the best soil for them, and the pots to be well drained with small potsherds, that the water may pass off freely, as nothing is more inju-

rious to them than to be sodden with too much water. Young cuttings are not difficult to root, planted in sand under a bell-glass; they may also be raised from seeds, which are sometimes produced.

Bystuopogon is a genus belonging to the Labiate* ; its species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass.

C.

Cacalia is a genus belonging to the Composite ; several of its species are succulent, and require scarcely any water, particularly when not in a growing state; a mixture of sandy loam and brick rubbish is a good soil for them, with their pots well drained; and cuttings strike root freely, but require to lie a few days in a dry place, that the wound may be dried up before planting, or they are apt to rot; they may then be planted in the same kind of soil, and set in a dry place, and they will require no water till rooted.

Cactus is now made into a natural order, under the name of Cacteae : the greenhouse kinds grow freely in the same kind of soil as the last genus : they need but little water, except at the flowering season, when they may be more plentifully supplied. Cuttings root very readily, but should be dried a little before planting, or they are liable to rot.

C/enoptekis is a genus of Ferns ; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seed.

C/esi a is a New Holland genus belonging to the Asphodeleae; it grows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and may be increased by dividing it at the root, or by seeds.

Ca laden i a is a pretty genus of New Holland Or-chidem ; the outside of the flowers are covered with glands; its species succeed best in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand ; and would probably endure our winters in the open air with a slight protection.

Calampelis is a handsome climbing genus belonging to Bignoniaceee; it is a very desirable plant, and hardy enough to endure our severest winters in the open ground, with a very little protection ; it also makes a fine climber for the greenhouse or conservatory; but the flowers are not of so fine a colour there, as out of doors ; young cuttings root readily in a light soil under a handglass, and a rich light soil is the best to grow it in.

Calandrinia is a handsome genus, belonging to the Portulaceae; the species are rather succulent, and therefore require but little water, when not in a free growing state ; the best soil for them is a mixture of loam, peat, and sand ; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, will strike root readily, without any covering.

Calceolaria is a genus of very ornamental flow-

ering plants, several species of which are now in our collections ; some of the species are annual, some herbaceous, and others suffruticose. The herbaceous and suffrutescent species thrive well in a mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand ; and young cuttings, planted under common handglasses, in the same sort of soil, will root freely; they also produce plenty of seeds, if care be taken to fertilize the stigmas with the pollen, when the plants are in bloom : some of the seeds may be sown as soon as ripe, and the plants potted off in little pots, as soon as up; they will then make flowering plants for the next year ; the remainder of the seeds may be kept till spring, and then sown, to raise strong flowering plants for the next season. They succeed well in the open borders in summer, where they become loaded with their curious flowers ; there are several hybrids of them already raised from seeds ; and we may expect to see a great many more.

Calendula belongs to the Composite ; several of its species are handsome greenhouse plants, which thrive well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings of most kinds root freely under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil; they will also root without a glass, if placed in a shady situation.

Caleya is an Orchideous genus from New Holland, which thrives best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and requires precisely the same sort of treatment as Caladenia.

Call a is a genus belonging to the Aroideae, which grows freely in any rich light soil, and flowers nearly all the year; it is readily increased by offsets from the roots.

Callicarpa belongs to Verbenaceae ; the greenhouse species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass, will soon root.

Callicojia is a pretty New Holland genus belonging to the Cunoniaceae : it thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Callistach vs is a genus belonging to the Papili-onaceae; the species are handsome plants for a conservatory, being fast growers and free flow-erers. A mixture of loam and peat is the best soil for them ; and cuttings, planted in sand, under a bell-glass, root readily. They may be also raised from seeds, which are produced in considerable quantities.

Callistemon is a beautiful genus belonging to the Myrtaceae; to it belong Metrosideros lan-ceolata, scabra, glauca, lophantha, leptostachya, saligna, linearis, and many other species; these are all desirable plants for a conservatory or greenhouse, particularly plants that are raised from cuttings taken oft’ flowering plants, as they flower when young; whereas seedling plants do not flower till they are large. Ripened cuttings will strike root in pots of sand, placed under a

hand-glass. They may be also raised from seeds, which are frequently produced on large plants.

Callitris belongs to the Coniferae, to the tribe Cupressineae : its species thrive well in an equal mixture of loam and peat: and they are nearly hardy, requiring but a little protection in winter. Cuttings, not quite ripened, will strike root, planted under a hand-glass in sand.

Calochilus isa New Holland genus of Orchideae; its species thrive best in an equal mixtureof loam, peat, and sand; and would succeed well in a frame, or in a warm border in the open air, if covered a little in severe frosty weather.

Calodendrum is a fine Cape genus; it is generally supposed to be one of the finest trees known there; its fruit bears great resemblance to a Chestnut, but seldom arrives here in a growing state. It grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root readily in pots of sand, under a hand-glass, but they must be planted soon enough to be rooted, before they drop their leaves, or they will do no good.

Calopogon pulchellus is a pretty plant belonging to the Orchideae: it may be preserved in a frame during winter; or turned out in a pit, and planted in peat mould, will suit it better than any other means; it will also thrive well in a warm border, in peat.

Calostemm a is a pretty bulbous-rooted genus belonging to the Amaryllideae; the species will

thrive well in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand, and require scarcely any water when not in a growing state; they are free flowerers, and ripen their seeds, by which they are readily increased; they would succeed better planted out in a pit or frames, or in a warm border, with a slight covering in frosty weather.

Calothajmnus is a fine genus belonging to the Myrtaceaj, and is deserving a place in every collection; the species thrive best in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand; and cuttings are notdifficultto root in sand, under a bell-glass, but care must be taken to wipe the glass occasionally, or they will damp off.

Calotis is a pretty new Holland genus with blue flowers, belonging to the Composite; it thrives well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and produces its pretty blue flowers the greater part of the year; young cuttings of it root freely under a common hand-glass, in the same sort of soil.

Ca lttrtx is a curious genus, belonging to the Myr-tacese; each segment of the calyx is terminated by a long hair; its species grow freely in sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings strike root readily in sand, under a bell-glass.

Camellia is a genus universally admired by all collectors of plants; a great many varieties of C. japonica are now cultivated in the collections about London, and new ones without end, are now continually raising from seeds: they are very hardy greenhouse plants, and are easily ma-

naged, requiring only shelter from severe frost; they are therefore the most suitable plants for growing in rooms: the best soil for them is an equal quantity of good sandy loam and peat; and the pots well drained with pieces of potsherds, that they may not get soddened with too much wet, as nothing injures them more than overwatering, particularly when they are not in a growing state. When growing freely, they can scarcely have too much; and they should be watered all over the leaves with a fine rose pot; they are readily increased by cuttings, or inarching on the common kinds. The cuttings should be taken off at a joint as soon as ripened, and planted in sand under hand-glasses, and they will soon strike root, when they should be potted off singly in small pots, and set in a close frame, and they must be hardened to the air by degrees. C. Sa-sanqua and its varieties, C. malifolia, and C. olce-iftra, require exactly the same treatment.

Campanula is a genus which consists chiefly of hardy herbaceous plants; they will thrive in any light rich soil; and may be increased by cuttings, planted under a hand-glass.

Camphorosma is a genus belonging to the Che-nopodeae. It is not worth cultivating except in general collections: it will grow freely in any light rich soil; and cuttings root readily, planted under a hand-glass.

Campomanesia is a genus belonging to the Myr-taceae: it succeeds well in an equal mixture of

sandy loam and peat; and cuttings, not quite ripened, will strike root in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass on a little heat.

Ca mpyli a is a pretty genus belonging to the Ge-raniaceae; its species all succeed well in an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand, with the pots well drained with small potsherds; they require a regular supply of water, always giving them some when the mould appears dry, but they require an airy situation in winter, or they are apt to damp and get mouldy; they are readily increased by cuttings taken off at a joint in the young wood, and planted in pots of the same sort of soil; they need not be covered with glasses, but only require to be placed in a shady part of the greenhouse, and regularly watered when dry.

Canarina is a pretty genus, belonging to Cam-panulaceae: we have seen two very distinct species of it in flower; they are very desirable plants, as they flower in autumn and winter, when few other plants are in bloom. After flowering, the stem dies down, and the roots continue dormant all the summer, when they require but little water. When they begin to grow, they had better be placed in the stove, as they will not flower so abundantly in the greenhouse. A light loamy soil suits them best, or a mixture of loam and peat; and they are readily increased by dividing the roots, or from cuttings, planted in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass.

Can avalia bonarieiisis is a pretty Papilionaceous

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climber, a very abundant bloomer, and produces long racemes of crimson flowers: it will prove a very handsome climber for a greenhouse or conservatory, and thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and may be increased by young cuttings, planted in sand, under a handglass, on a little heat.

Candollea is a pretty genus belonging to Dille-niaceae: its species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand; and young cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, on a slight heat, will strike root readily.

Canna is a very pretty genus; several species will succeed in the greenhouse, others require the heat of the stove; two species only, we believe, are quite hardy, the C. patens, and C. speciosa. Several writers in Loudon’s Gardener's Magazine, have said, that C. indica was quite hardy: but it will not even thrive in a greenhouse, but requires the stove: they all most probably intend C .patens instead of indica, as it is the most common species of the whole: all the species succeed well in a rich light soil, and are increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

CAPPAiiis,orCaper-tree,is a pretty genus. C.ovata and spinosa, and a few other greenhouse species, succeed best planted in lime rubbish, mixed with loam; in this they grow rather stunted, and by that means they flower more freely: young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, on a slight heat, will root readily.

Capra hi a is a genus belonging to the Scrophu-larinae. They grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Cargillia belongs to the Ebenaceae ; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, under a handglass, will strike root.

Carlowizia belongs to the Compositae. It succeeds well in a loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Car.mich.elia isa very pretty Papilionaceous genus, from New Zealand; the stems have flat sides, and bear very few leaves; the neat little flowers are produced in abundance in little racemes, and are prettily striped: it succeeds well in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand ; and young cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, under a bell-glass, will strike root: it may also be raised from seeds, which sometimes ripen.

Ca rpodontus is related to the Ilypericineje; it is a native of Van Diemen’s Island ; and succeeds well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings, not quite ripe, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Cartonema is a New Holland genus, belonging to Commelinese, a native of New Holland, with tuberous roots : it succeeds best in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand ; and must be increased by seeds.

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Cassia is a genus which consists chiefly of stove plants. The greenhouse kinds grow well in loam and peat; and may be increased by cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass; or from seeds, which are generally produced in abundance. Some of the New Holland species will survive our winters in the open borders, with a slight covering in severe frost.

Cassine belongs to the Celastrineae. Its species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings strike root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Cassini a is an Australian genus of Composite : the different species succeed well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, of the frutescent species, root readily in the same sort of soil, either under a hand-glass, or in pots placed in a shady part of the greenhouse.

Castilleja is an American genus, belonging to Scrophularineae: the greenhouse species succeed well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Casuarina is a genus which grow to large timber trees in New Holland : the species are best grown in a conservatory, where they are desirable, as they flower in winter, when there is little besides. The flowers are not very handsome, but the female ones are pretty enough. It will grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in sand under a hand-glass, and seeds are frequently imported.

Ce a noth us is a genus belonging to the Celastrineae. The greenhouse species thrive well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily in sand, under a bell-glass.

Celastkus is another genus belonging to the Celastrineae. It grows freely in the same kind of soil as the last genus; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Centaurea belongs to the Composite. Very few species require the protection of a greenhouse. C. ragusina isavery pretty greenhouse plant, and grows well in a mixture of loam and peat. Cuttings strike root freely, under a hand-glass, in the same kind of soil.

Cephalotus is a curious New Holland genus, belonging to Rosaceae: its leaves form little pitchers, very similar to the Pitcher plants, the lids ofwhich are fringed, and make a very pretty appearance: some very healthy plants of it are now flourishing in Mr. Knight’s greenhouse, where they are plunged in a large pot in peat soil, and some grass planted round them to shade them from the scorching rays of the sun : in this manner they appear to thrive very well.

Ceratonia Siliqua, the St.John’s Bread, is hardly worth cultivating, except in general collections. It will thrive well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings will strike root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Ceratopetalum is a curious New Holland genus belonging to the Cunoniaceae: it succeeds well s 4

in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings, nearly ripened, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will root without difficulty.

Cereus is the most beautiful flowering genus belonging to the Cactese ; and many of the species succeed well in the greenhouse, particularly those from Mexico, Chile, and Peru: the most beautiful species that will thrive in the greenhouse, are C. phyllanthoides, (the speciosus of the gardens,) C. Ackermanni, C. Jenkinsoni, (a hybrid between C. speciosissimus, and C. phyllanthoides,') C. speciosissimus, C.flagelUformis, and some others: there are now in the gardens hybrid productions between C .flagelliformis and C. speciosissimus; also, between the former and C. phyllanthoides, between C.grandiftorus and C. speciosissimus, and several others ; and it is most probable, that many of the introduced plants are native hybrids, as the insects of various sorts, as well as humming birds, are continually flitting about from flower to flower, in the warm climates; and it is not very probable that the species would approach each other so nearly, if they were not hybrid productions : and we have been informed by Mr. George Don, that when he was at Brazil, and other parts of South America, he saw numerous sorts of Cacti growing altogether, and appeared as if they were all intermixed one with the other: the best soil for them is a light sandy loam, mixed with some old lime rubbish : to be exposed to the open air all the summer, to keep them from being drawn

up weak, that they may have sufficient strength to produce large flowers: cuttings should be laid to dry a few days before planting, otherwise they are apt to rot.

Ceropegia is a pretty genus of the Asclepiadeae, the flowers of which are fringed, and have a curious appearance: the greenhouse species succeed well in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand: the pots to be well drained with potsherds, that the moisture may pass off regularly: the tuberous rooted sorts require but little water in winter, when dormant: the succulent ones must not have much either, at that season : young cuttings of the tuberous rooted sorts should be put in as early as possible in spring, that the young plants may have sufficient time to make tubers before winter: they will otherwise perish at that season: the succulent species may be put in whenever the cuttings are fit to be taken off, and they will root readily.

Cestrum is a genus which consists chiefly of stove plants. The greenhouse kinds will grow well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Chama;laucium is a New Holland genus, belonging to the Myrtaceae ; it succeeds well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings, a little hardened, will soon strike root, in a pot of sand, under a bell-glass.

Charlwoodia is a fine stately genus, belonging to the Aspliodeleae, and somewhat related to

Dracaena, from which it essentially differs in the number of seeds, and in other particulars: there are two species in the gardens, one with pale purple flowers, and the other with blue ones: they must be kept in a very warm greenhouse, as they are very tender, or a cool part of the stove; and may be increased by cuttings, when the tops must be cut off, and they will produce side shoots; they also produce one or two frequently after flowering: those planted in pots, without being deprived of their leaves, or those shortened, will strike root readily, placed under a hand-glass, and planted in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand, which is also the best soil to growthem in.

Cheilanthes is a genus of the Ferns, which thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and is increased by dividing at the root or by seeds.

Ciieiranthus, or Wall-flower, belongs to the natural order Crucifer*. The greenhouse kinds will thrive in any light rich soil; and young cuttings, planted in the same kind of soil, under a handglass, will strike root readily. They will also root without a glass, if placed in a shady situation.

Chenolea diffusa belongs to the Chenopodeae. The most of its beauty consists in its silvery leaves. Any rich light soil will suit it; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Chiloglottis is a New Holland Orchideous genus, with bulbous roots ; the best soil for it is an equal portion of light turfy loam, turfy peat, and sand; and it will do better planted out in a frame,

or even in the border, if care be taken to protect it from the frost in severe weather, but to be left exposed when the weather is mild.

Chimonanthus is the genus to which Calycanthus ■pi'(Ecox belongs; it will endure our winters in the open air, but is seen to the greatest advantage in a conservatory, as its flowers are produced in winter, and they are liable to be injured by frost, if exposed to the open air. Its delightful fragrance makes it well deserving a place in all collections. Three different varieties, or perhaps species, are nowin the gardens near London. It will thrive in almost any soil, but prefers a mixture of loam and peat. It may be increased by layers; or young cuttings, planted in sand, under a bell-glass, and plunged in a little heat, will strike root; seeds are also frequently ripened.

C h i ron i a is a pretty genus, belonging to the Gen-tianese. The species are not long-lived plants, and therefore require to be frequently raised from cuttings. Peat mould suits them best, and a little loam mixed with it; and young cuttings, planted in the same kind of soil, under hand-glasses, strike root readily.

Chlidanthus fragrans belongs to the Amarylli-deae, and thrives best in two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third sand and peat, requiring no water when not in a growing state: bulbs of it planted in the borders in spring will flower in the summer, but they will require to be taken up in autumn, and kept dry through the winter; or if left

in the borders all the winter, they will require a good covering in severe frost.

Chloanthes is a New Holland genus, belonging to Verbenaceae : they are suffrutescent plants, and thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; young cuttings root readily in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass.

Chlorophytum is a genus belonging to the As-phodeleae, which grows best in a mixture of loam, peat, and sand, and is increased by otfsets from the root, or by seeds.

Chorizema is a pretty decandrous genus, belonging to the Papilionaceae. An equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand, suits its species best; and young cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in sand, will strike root; but they are best raised from seeds, which ripen in abundance.

Chrysanthemum belongs to the order of Com-positae. Most of its species are hardy: the greenhouse kinds will thrive in any light rich soil; and young cuttings root freely, under a hand-glass.

Chrysocoma is another genus belonging to the Compositae, which thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings will soon root, under a hand-glass.

Chuquiraga is a genus belonging to the Labia-taeflorae tribe of Compositae ; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of light sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Cibotium is a New Holland genus of tree Ferns;

it requires a very warm part of the greenhouse to succeed well, or a cold part of the stove, and to be grown in a mixture of sandy loam and peat.

Ciconium is a genus of the Geraniacexe; which differs from Pelargonium, in its upper petals being smallest; and its upper stamens being very short and straight, and constitutes a very natural genus : most of the species are free growers, and abundant bloomers; and in general pretty hardy; but some of them are rather tender, and require a warm and dry situation in winter; the tender-est sorts are C. micranthum, C. inquinans, C.hy-bridum, and C. monstrum ; they are all fond of a rich light soil; a mixture of light loam, and some well rotten dung, or leaf mould, is a very proper soil for them; and young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, either in spring or summer, will root readily, if placed in a sheltered situation, or on a shelf in the greenhouse.

Cineraria belongs to the Composite; the greenhouse species thrive well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them very well; the herbaceous species may be increased by dividing at the root; the frutescent ones by young cuttings being planted in pots, or under handglasses, in the same sort of soil.

Cissampelos belongs to the natural order of Me-nispermaceie. It grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass.

Cissvs belongs to the order of Ampelideae. The

Species are mostly climbing plants, and not very ornamental. Any rich light soil will suit them; and cuttings will strike root freely under handglasses, or in a hot-bed frame.

Cistus is a beautiful genus, consisting of hardy shrubs, and others that require to be protected in winter, either in a greenhouse, or in frames. The cultivation of them is not so general, as it would otherwise be, on account of their having been so badly known; every cultivator varying in their names, and confusing one with another: but we have now set this somewhat to rights, by the work that we have published on the tribe, where full and faithfully coloured figures are given as well as descriptions of all the species that we could procure; so that they now cannot fail to be understood by those who possess the work. Most of the species will survive through the winter in the open air, if the weather be not too severe ; but it is safest to keep some of all the sorts in pots, that they may be sheltered from severe frosts; and they can be turned out in the borders in spring, when they will thrive and flower well. They will succeed in any common soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them very well. They may be increased by layers; or young cuttings, as soon as ripened, taken off at a joint, and planted under a hand-glass, will root readily: they may be also raised from seeds, which are produced in abundance.

Citrus, or the Orange and Lemon tribe,will thrive

well ina rich loamy soil, mixed with a little rotten dung. Care must be taken not to over-pot the species, or to give them too much water when not in a growing state. The plants do not want shifting into fresh pots so often as some other sorts: their roots being of rather a succulent nature, they are liable to get bruised, which will injure their growth. The different kinds may be procured by budding, or ingrafting on the common stocks; the best time for doing this is in February or March, as the plants will then be well taken very shortly, and if on good strong stocks will make nice plants by autumn; they, as soon as worked, should be set in a close frame, on a moderate dung heat, but not plunged, as that might injure their roots. The steam that arises from the dung will make the wound callous immediately; we would not advise cutting off the heads of the stocks till such time as the grafts are well taken, and then we would still leave them in the frame till the wounds are healed up, or it is apt to check their growth: we have seen them succeed much better by this plan than by any other means; but they may then have a little air given them, and must be hardened off by degrees. The stocks for working them on are raised from the seeds of any Oranges or Lemons; the Shaddock also makes a very good stock. They are sometimes raised from cuttings, in the same way as Camellia, and then produce fruit when very small plants, but seldom attain any large size.

Clematis is a genus belonging to the Ranuncu-laceie, and chiefly consists of hardy climbers : the greenhouse kinds are likewise fast-growing climbers, and are very desirable plants for a conservatory where many climbing plants are wanted. Any light rich soil will suit them very well, or a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings will strike root freely, under hand-glasses.

Clerodendrum is a genus belonging to the Ver-benacese. The greenhouse kinds thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings strike root freely, under hand-glasses, in a little moist heat.

Clethra arborea is a fine greenhouse plant, and well adapted for a large conservatory: it thrives well in peat soil; or if a little loam be mixed with it, it will flower more abundantly. Cuttings, not too ripe, will strike root readily in sand, under a hand-glass; or plants may be raised from seeds, which ripen plentifully.

Cliffortia is a Cape genus : the flowers are not very showy, but some of the species are pretty plants. They thrive well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root freely in sand, under a bell-glass.

Clivia is a beautful Cape genus, belonging to the Amaryllideae; it is notone of the bulbous tribe, but is more of the habit of Agapanthus, and therefore should be arranged next to Doryanthes ; it requires a warm part of the greenhouse, or a cool part of the stove, to grow and flower in perfec-

tion ; we have not heard that it has as yet flowered in any collection, excepting that of His Grace the Duke of Northumberland : thebestsoil for it is a rich loam, with about one-third sand, and to be well supplied with water when growing freely: it may be occasionally increased by dividing it at the root, or by seeds, which appear to ripen in abundance.

Cluytia is a genus belonging to the Euphorbiacese, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings strike root readily in sand, under a bell-glass.

Cneorum, or Widow-wail, thrives well in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat. It will survive through the winter in the open air, if the weather be not severe; and ripened cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass: it may also be raised from seeds, which are produced in considerable quantities.

Co B(E a scandens is a very fast growing climber, and produces abundance of flowers: it is best suited to a large conservatory, or any place that is wanted to be covered quick. It will thrive well in the open air in summer, and will grow to a great length if allowed, and makes a fine appearance when growing up by the side of a house, or on a large viranda: if the wall is rough on which it runs up, the tendrils will catch fast hold of the bricks or crevices, and support the branches without assistance. It is best raised from seeds, which

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ripen in abundance; or it may be struck from cuttings, under a hand-glass, in a little moist heat.

Comesperma is a pretty New Holland genus, belonging to the Polygalese: its species succeed well in two-thirds sandy peat, and one-third sandy loam, the pots to be well drained that the moisture may pass off readily : young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, covered with a bell-glass, and placed in the propagating house, will strike root readily.

Com melina is a pretty genus, which thrives well in a sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat. The species may be increased by dividing them at the root, or from seeds,which ripen abundantly; several of them may be planted out in the open borders in spring, their roots to be taken up in winter, and preserved in the same manner as those of Georgina, and many other tuberous and bulbous-rooted plants; they should be preserved in sand or dry mould, and be kept out ofthe reach of frost.

Con a nth era is a pretty genus, belonging to As-phodeleie ; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand, and may be increased by offsets from the root, or by seeds : wre believe the present genus, and some other nearly related ones, w'ould succeed as well or better if planted out in aframe,orawarm border, and to be covered with a matorany otherslight covering in severe weather, and to be always exposed when the weather is mild.

Con d alia is a genus belonging to the Rhamneie: its species thrive well in an equal mixture ofloam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass, and placed in the propagating house, in a proper situation, will soon strike root.

Conostylis belongs to the Ilemodoracese ; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing them at the root, or by seeds.

Convolvulus is a showy genus ; most of the species are climbers, and are desirable for the greenhouse and conservatory : they will all thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike root readily, under a hand-glass, in sand. Several of the species may also be increased by cuttings from the roots.

Convza is a genus belonging to the Composite. The greenhouse kinds grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings will soon root under a hand-glass.

Corn aria sarmentosa is a New Zealand plant, and will succeed in the open borders with a little protection in winter; it thrives well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings root readily, planted in the same sort of soil, under a common hand-glass.

Coris monspeliensis is a pretty little plant of rather a succulent nature, so that it requires but little water, and the pots to be well drained. A mixture of loam and peat suits it as well as any thing;

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and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in the same kind of soil, will root readily; but it is best raised from seeds, which ripen plentifully.

Coroni lla belongs to the Papilionaceae : there are several greenhouse kinds, all pretty flowering shrubs, and easily managed : they will all thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat, and are readily increased by seed, which ripen in abundance ; and cuttings will root readily, under a hand-glass, in sand. Several of the species are very fit plants for turning out in the borders in spring, such as valentina, glauca, and juficea; they will then make nice bushes, and flower all the summer; and if the winters are not very severe, they will live with very little protection.

Correa is a pretty New Holland genus belonging to Rutaceae, which thrives well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cut-

• tings will root freely in sand, under a bell or hand-glass. The cuttings must not be planted too thick, or they will be liable to damp. C.specio-sa has generally been reckoned difficult to strike from cuttings, but it roots as free as the others, ifproperly managed, and requires the same treatment. It may also be increased by inarching it on the common sorts, as may also C. pulchella.

Corycium is a Cape genus of Orchideae, which thrives best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; its species succeed best by being planted out in a pit or frame; or they will succeed well in a warm border, to be planted about six inches

deep, and to be covered with a mat or any other slight covering in frosty weather, but to be exposed to the air when the weather is fine and mild.

Corysanthes is a handsome New Holland genus of Orchideae, succeeding best in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand, and requires * precisely the same sort of management as the last genus.

Cosmelia is a beautiful New Holland genus, belonging to Epacrideae; it succeeds well in a very sandy peat soil, the pots to be well drained with potsherds broken small, that the moisture may pass off readily: young cuttings, planted in sand, under bell-glasses, from August to October, or from February to March, will root freely, if placed in the cutting-house, and shaded from the sun in warm weather; they will not root near so well, if put in when the weather becomes warm in summer.

Cotyledon is a succulent genus belonging to the Crassulaceae, which thrives well in a sandy loam, and requires but little water, and the pots to be well drained. Most of the greenhouse kinds are natives of the Cape of Good Hope, and many of them bear handsome flowers. Cuttings, taken off and dried a few days, will root freely when planted in a pot of mould.

Coursetia is a Papilionaceous genus: the greenhouse species thrive best in two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass, with their t 3

leaves all entire, will root freely, if set in a warm place in the propagating house.

Craniotojie is a Nepaul genus belonging to La-biatse; its species are not very handsome: they grow freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, and placed in the greenhouse, will soon strike root.

Crassula is a pretty succulent genus, belonging to the Crassulaceae; a mixture of sandy loam and brick rubbish is the best soil for them, and the pots must be well drained. Cuttings root easily if laid to dry a few days after cutting off before they are planted, to dry up the wound, that they may not rot. They require no covering, but may be placed in any convenient situation.

Crinum is a fine stately genus belonging to the Amaryllidete; some of the Cape and New Holland species succeed well in the open borders, to be planted in a warm situation about six or eight inches deep, according to the size of the bulbs, and to be covered with a mat or some other slight covering in severe frost; a little frost will do them no harm, and they will flower two or three times in the season ; those that require the greenhouse, succeed best in a sandy loam, mixed with about one-third peat, and they may all be increased by seeds, or by suckers from the roots.

Crotalaria is a genus belonging to the Papilio-naceae. Some of the greenhouse species are very handsome plants. A mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for them; and young cuttings,

planted under a bell-glass, either in sand or mould, will root freely. They also ripen seeds, by whieh they are easily raised.

Crowea is a pretty New Holland genus belonging to Rutacese, which continues to flower the greater part of the year : an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for it, and care must be taken not to over-water it, or it will look yellow and unhealthy. It likes an airy situation, and not to be crowded amongst other plants. Cuttings strike root freely in sand, under a bell-glass.

Crucianeli.a, or Crosswort, is agenus belonging to the Rubiaceae. The greenhouse kinds grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass.

Cryptandra is a New Holland genus, and belongs to the Rhamneae; its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings, nearly ripened, and planted in pots of sand, under bell-glasses, will root readily.

Cryptocarya belongs to the Laurinae: its species succeed best in a mixture of two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third peat; and ripened cuttings, with their leaves not shortened, will root freely, in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, but not on heat.

Cryptospermum is a new Holland genus, which grows best in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely, under a hand-glass, in the same kind of soil.

Cryptostylis is a New Holland genus of Orchi-

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deae, with fasciculated bulbs; its species succeed best in an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand, and thrive best planted out in a pit or frame, or in a warm border, where it will require a little covering in winter; but to be exposed as much as possible to the air in mild weather.

Cuuuiii a is a curious genus belonging to the Composite. It thrives best in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings will root in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass.

Cummingia is a pretty bulbous genus from Valparaiso, belonging to the Asphodeleae ; we are now acquainted with three species of it, two of which have been lately introduced, and one of them has already produced its curious flowers with Mr. Anderson, at the Chelsea Botanic Garden, where several other curious bulbs and seeds have been lately introduced from the same country: the best soil to grow them in is an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand; and they will succeed well, planted out in a frame or pit, or in a warm border in a sheltered situation, to be covered a little, or the bulbs taken up before winter, and planted again in February : they may be increased by seeds, or by offsets from the bulbs.

Cunoni a is a pretty genus from the Cape, belonging to Cunoniaceae; a mixture of loam and peat is the best soil for it; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will strike root.

Cupressus is a genus belonging to the Coniferae. The greenhouse kinds thrive well in a mixture of

loam and peat; and young cuttings will root in sand, under a bell-glass.

Curculigo is a bulbous genus, as far as relates to the Cape species. A mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for them, and they should be kept without water when in a dormant state, and shifted in fresh soil when they are beginning to grow, then they will thrive and dower freely. They are increased by offsets from the bulbs, or from seeds.

Curtisia, or Hassagay tree, is a Cape genus, belonging to Celastrineae, with fine broad foliage; but we believe it has never produced its flowers in this country as yet. It thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings will root, under a hand-glass, in sand.

Curtogyne belongs to the Crassulaceae, and its species require precisely the same sort of treatment as Crassula.

Cuscuta is a parasitical genus belonging to Con-volvulaceae ; the seeds must be first sown in pots, and as soon as the plants are up, they should be planted by the side of some slender soft wooded plant, that the young shoots may lay hold of it; and when they have firmly taken hold, they must be removed to some other plant with a plenty of branches, that they may have sufficient room to run about; but the plants on which they are introduced must not be of much value, as they are sure to be killed at last, if suffered to remain. Most of the species perfect abundance of seeds ; they

may also be increased by shoots taken off, and tied up in moss to any plant, on which they are intended to be placed ; the moss must be kept moist, till such time as the shoots have laid hold of the plants; most of the species produce an abundance of glossy white or blush coloured flowers, and generally very fragrant.

Cussonia is also a Cape genus, belonging to the Araliaceae. They will thrive well in sandy loam, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them well; and cuttings root readily in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass.

Cvanella is a bulbous genus from the Cape, belonging to Asphodeleae; its species are very variable in the colour of the flowers, and are very pretty, some of them are sweet-scented; an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand, is the most proper soil for them ; and, like the other Cape bulbs, they will succeed well in a pit or frame, or in a warm border, with a little covering in winter; and may be increased by ort'sets from the bulbs, or by seeds.

Cyathodes is a genus of New Holland plants, and belongs to the Stypheliae tribe of Epacrideae; the best soil for them is an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand, with their pots well drained, that the moisture may pass off readily; young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, in February or March, or in September, will root readily, placed in the propagation house.

Cyclamen is a pretty genus belonging to the Pri-

mulaceae. C. persicum is the only greenhouse kind; but most of the other species may be brought forward in the greenhouse, where they are seen to most advantage. They thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and are readily increased by seeds, which ripen abundantly; these should be sown as soon as ripe, or they will not grow so well.

Cyclobothra is a bulbous genus of plants from Mexico, belonging to the Tulipaceae ; and nearly related to Calochortus; its species thrive well in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand, and stand the winter well in a warm border in the open ground, with a very little protection in winter ; they may be readily increased by the little viviparous bulbs that are produced on the upper part of the stem.

Cyclopia is a pretty decandrous genus belonging to the Papilionaceaj; an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for it; andveryyoung cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in sand, will rootreadily; buttheglassmustbekeptwipedwhen it is dewy inside, or the cuttings will damp off.

Cylista is a Papilionaceous genus of climbing plants, most of which require the heat of the Stove; the greenhouse ones grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in a pot of sand, with their leaves entire, will root readily.

Cymbopogon is a genus of tropical Grasses; its

species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root.

Cyminosma belongs to the Rutaceae; its species grow freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings will root readily in sand, under hand-glasses, on a little heat.

Cynanciiuji is a pretty genus belonging to the Asclepiadeae: the greenhouse kinds are handsome climbers, which thrive well in loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in sand, under a bell-glass.

Cyphi a is a Cape genus belonging to the Lobelia-ceae : it thrives well in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand, and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass. Some of the sorts have large tuberous roots, which must be kept quite dry, when not in a growing state, or they will rot; those may be increased, just as the plant is beginning to grow, by cutting off the young shoot, and planting it in the same sort of soil in a small pot; keeping it dry till the wound is dried, over, that it may not rot, and not covering it with glass; and it will soon form a tuber of itself, and the old plant will make fresh shoots.

Cyrilla caroliniana is a pretty shrub belonging to the Ericeae: a mixture of sandy loam and peat suits it very well; and young cuttings will strike root, under a bell-glass, in sand, but not freely.

Cyrtanthus is a fine genus of Cape bulbs belonging to the Amaryllideae. A mixture of rather more than one third turfy loam, a third of sand, and the rest turfy peat, is the most proper soil

for the species; and if care be taken to fertilize the stigmas with the pollen when in bloom, they will produce abundance of seeds. They require plenty of water when in a growing state, but scarcely any when dormant; and they should be fresh potted just before they begin to grow, then they will flower freely: like the other Cape bulbs, they may be grown in a pit or frame, with a little protection in winter. And may be increased by seeds, or offsets from the bulbs.

Cy rtosttli s is a New Holland genus of Orchidese; and requires precisely the same sort of treatment as Cryptostylis and Corysanthes.

Cytisus is a genus belonging to the Papilionaceae. The greenhouse kinds thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings taken off at a joint, and planted in sand, under a bell-glass, will root freely; but the glasses must be taken off and wiped often, as they are very liable to damp and turn mouldy, which is certain death to them; they may be also raised from seeds, which are generally produced in abundance.

D.

D a c r v n i u m cupressinum is theNewZealandSpruce; it succeeds well in a mixture of two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a handglass, will not be difficult to root.

Dais is a pretty genus belonging to the Thymelea;.

It grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and may be increased by cuttings of the roots, placed in a warm situation, or by seeds, which often ripen.

Da lea is a pretty Papilionaceous genus, belonging to the tribe of Galegeae ; the greenhouse species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, not quite ripened, will root freely in pots of sand, under bell-glasses; but the leavesmust not be shortened, and the glasses must be frequently wiped, and a little air given them occasionally, as they are otherwise apt to turn mouldy, and damp off.

Damm aka, to which the Cowrie Tree of New Zealand belongs, requires precisely the same kind of treatment as Dacrydium.

Dampiera is a New Holland genus, belonging to the Goodenoviae; it thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root freely under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil.

Daphne odora is a pretty sweet-scented shrub belonging to the Thymeleae: a loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat, suits it very well; and ripened cuttings taken off at a joint and planted in sand, not too close together, under a handglass, will root readily.

Daulingtonia is an American genus, belonging to the Mimosae ; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and are nearly hardy enough to stand our winters in the open air without protection ; a very little of which is

necessary to preserve them, even if the winter prove severe ; they may be increased by seeds, or by young cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in a pot of sand, or by pieces of the roots.

Darwinia is a pretty genus, belonging to the Chamaelaucieae tribe of Myrtaceae; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand; and youngish cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, under a bell-glass, will root without difficulty.

Davallia is a genus of the Ferns, which thrives well in loam and peat; and is increased by dividing at the root, or by seed.

Daviesia is a beautiful New Holland Papilionaceous genus ; a mixture of an equal quantity of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for it; and cuttings, not too ripe, will strike root readily, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a handglass without bottom heat. D. latifolia is generally supposed to be very difficult to strike, but it roots as freely as any plant need to do by the above method.

Dendrobium belongs to the family of the Orchi-deae. The greenhouse kinds from New Holland thrive best in sandy peat; and are increased by dividing at the root.

D err is is a genus of the Leguminosae, belonging to the tribe Dalbergieae : it grows freely in a mixture of two-thirds sandy loam, and the rest peat; and cuttings, nearly ripened, will not be difficult

to root, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, but the leaves must notbe shortened.

Deverra is an Umbelliferous genus: its species succeed well in a mixture of two-thirds loam, and one of peat; and youngish cuttings, planted in the same kind of soil, and placed under a handglass, will soon strike root.

Dianella is a new Holland genus belonging to the Asphodeleae : a mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for it; and it is readily increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Dianthus, or the Pink genus, will thrive in any rich light soil; and young cuttings of the greenhouse species, strike root freely under a common hand-glass, in mould ; some of the species, from the Levant, are very handsome.

Dicera is a New Zealand genus belonging to Elte-ocarpeae: it succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, nearly ripened, will root readily, planted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Diceraia belongs to the Hedysareas tribe of Papi-lionaceae : the greenhouse species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings will root freely, planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass.

Djchilus belongs to the Genistae tribe of Papilio-naceae; it is a native of the Cape, and succeeds well in a mixture of turfy loam and peat, and is readily increased by young cuttings, planted in sand, under a bell-glass, where they will spon

produce roots; but the glass must be frequently wiped, or they will be liable to damp off.

Dichondra is a genus of creeping plants, belonging to the Convolvulaceae: they grow freely in any light sandy soil; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, or in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, will soon strike root, either with or without a glass.

Dicksonia is a genus of the Ferns; and its species thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; they are increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.    •

D i delta is a genus belonging to the Composite, which thrives well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit it as well as any. Cuttings root freely, planted under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil.

Dietes belongs to the Irideae, and is the Morcza iridioides of authors: it succeeds well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and is increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Digitalis canariemis and Sceptrum are the only greenhouse species: these thrive well in loam and peat, or any rich light soil; and may be increased by cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, or by seeds, which ripen plentifully.

Dilatris belongs to the order of the Haemodora-ceae. Its bulbs thrive best in a mixture of sandy loam and decayed leaves, or peat mould; and are increased by offsets from the bulbs, or by seeds.

Dillwynia is a pretty New Holland Papiliona-

ceous genus, with Heath-like leaves. An equal mixture of light turfy loam, peat, and sand, is the best soil for them; and the pots must be well drained, as they are very liable to suffer from too much wet. Young cuttings root freely in sand, under a bell-glass. '    •

Dim acria is oneof the tuberous rooted genera belonging to Geraniaceae. Its species succeed best in an equal mixture of light turfy loam, peat, and sand; they require also to be kept quite dry when not in a growing state, which commences as soon as they have done flowering, and have ripened their seeds; they then require to be kept in a cool situation, but out of the reach of frost; and as soon as they begin to push young leaves in the heart, they should have all the old mould shaken from their roots, and should be planted in fresh. In potting them, care must be taken not to bury the heart of the plant, or it will be apt to rot; when fresh planted they will require a little water, and as they grow, they must be watered whenever they are dry, and if the pots get filled with roots, they must be shifted into larger ones, in the same sort of soil: the best method of increasing them is by the little tubers of the roots, planted with their tops above the surface, that they may not rot; but they should lay to dry for a day or two before planting, to dry up the wounds.

Diomedea is a genus belonging to Composite, with silvery leaves; its species thrive well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, or any other rich

light soil; and young cuttings root readily, planted in pots of the same sort of soil, or without pots under a hand-glass.

Dionjea Muscipula, or Venus’s Fly-trap, thrives best, planted in small pots of peat soil, and some dwarf species of moss planted underneath it on the pot; two or three small pots may be plunged into a larger one, which should be planted all over with the dwarf moss, and should be placed in a pan of water, and a small hand-glass should be placed over the plants, but not close, or they will be apt to damp. Seeds are sometimes produced, by which they may be increased, as also by dividing them at the root.

D i o s m a is a Cape genus, which thrives best in sandy peat soil; and young cuttings root freely in sand, under a bell-glass.

Diospvros thrives well in a light loamy soil, and its species may be increased by inarching or budding on the common kinds, or by ripened cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Dipodium is a New Holland Orchideous genus, thriving well in an equal mixture of light turfy loam, peat, and sand: it may either be grown in pots in the greenhouse; or it will still succeed better planted out in a frame or pit, or in a border with a southern aspect, where it will require to be covered in frosty weather, but to be always left exposed to the open air when the weather is mild; it may be occasionally increased by dividing the roots.

u 2

Disa isaCapegenusof theOrchideac, which thrives best in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand, and to be planted out in a pit, in the way recommended for Antholyza, and other Cape bulbs ; if planted in pots, the same sort of soil is most proper for the different species, which require but little water when not in a growing state.

Disandra prostrata is a trailing plant, generally placed on a shelf in thegreenhouse to hangdown, where it looks very pretty, with its little yellow flowers. It will thrive in any rich light soil, and may be increased by dividing at the root, or from cuttings, which root readily under a common hand-glass, or without glass in a shady situation.

Disc aria is a new Holland genus, related toCol-letia, and belongs to the Rhamneas; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass, will root without diffi2ulty; seeds are also frequently imported from New Holland.

Di sen ism a is a pretty genus belonging to Selagi-neae, and most of the species are either annual or biennial: the annual ones will do well for border flowers in the open ground, to be raised early in spring in a pit or greenhouse, and to be planted out in the open borders as soon as ready, if the weather prove favourable;-the biennial and perennial species must be treated in the same manner as Hebenstreitia and Selago, to be grown in pots in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand; and young cuttings will root readily in a pot of

sand, under a bell-glass, or under a hand-glass, in a light sandy soil; seeds also ripen frequently, which should be sown as early as February, if convenient.

Disemma is a New Holland genus of Passifloraj; its species are handsome climbers for a greenhouse or conservatory, but require rather a warm situation to succeed well; their flowers are very curious and pretty, and therefore well worth cultivating : an equal mixture of turfy loam and peat is the best soil for them; and young cuttings, planted in pots of the same sort of soil, or in sand, and placed under a hand-glass on a little heat, will soon root.

Disophvlla isaNepaul genus ofLabiatae, nearly related to Mentha; its species are scarcely worth cultivating, except in a Botanic Garden, or where a general collection is kept up; a mixture of loam and peat is a proper soil for them, and they are readily increased by seeds.    .

Disperis is a Cape Orchideousgenus, and requires the same kind of treatment as Disa.

Disporum belongs to the Melanthacese; its species are natives of China and Nepaul; a mixture of two-thirds peat, and one-third loam, is a very proper soil for them, and they are hardy enough to succeed well in a frame or pit, or in a warm border, with the protection of a mat, or some other slight covering, in severe frost: they may be increased by dividing the roots, or by seeds.

Diurus is a New Holland Orchideous genus, and

u 3

also requires the same treatment as Disa and Disperis.

Dodon.ka thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, and is readily increased by cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in sand. Several New Holland species are now in the collections in the neighbourhood of London.

Do lichos is a genus of climbers belonging to the Papilionaceas. A mixture of loam and peat, or any rich light soil, will suit all the species; and they may be increased from cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, or from seeds, which ripen freely.

Doom a is a pretty genus ofthe Ferns, which thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and is increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Dokyanthes excelsa is a fine plant from New South Wales. It grows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, but does not flower till it gets large: a conservatory is the most proper place for it, as the flower stem grows to a great height before the flowers expand. It may be increased by suckers from the roots, but these are sparingly produced ; a great many plants of it are now frequently imported.

Dorycnium is a Papilionaceous genus, which thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in sand, will root freely; or it may be raised from seeds, which ripen in abundance.

Duacocephalum canariense, or Balm of Gilead,

will thrive in any light rich earth, ancl is readily increased by seeds; or young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Dracophyllum is a pretty genus belonging to Epacridese; its species succeed best in two-thirds of peat, the other third to be composed of equal parts of loam and sand ; care must be taken to drain the pots well, or they are very apt to go oft' at the bottom ; young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass, are not difficult to root.

Dr i mi a is a bulbous genus, belonging to Aspho-deleae, and native of the Cape. A mixture of sandy loam and decayed leaves, or peat soil, will suit its species well. They require but little water when not in a growing state, and to be fresh potted just before they begin to grow, and they will flower freely. They are increased by offsets from the bulbs, or by seeds.

Drimys Winteri, or Winter-bark-tree, is an interesting plant, containing the true Winter-bark. Living plants of it, in good health, have lately been brought home by Captain King, on his return from his late voyage of discovery; young plants had been previously raised from seeds, but were again lost, before they attained any size, so that their late introduction again may be considered of great importance ; they will most probably succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings, when any can be procured, will doubtless root freely in a pot of sand, under a hand-glass, on a little heat.

u 4

D r o s e r Arequires the same treatment asDion3ea,&c.

Drvandra is a beautiful genus belonging to the Proteaceae, and is nearly related to Banksia. Many new species have lately been introduced to our collections by Mr. Baxter. The whole of the different species thrive best in an equal mixture of light turfy loam, peat, and sand ; the more sandy the soil is, the better they will thrive. The pots must be well drained with potsherds, which should be broken very small, as the roots are fond of running amongst them. Ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, and planted in pots of sand, without shortening any of the leaves, will root freely if placed under hand-glasses, but not plunged; or on a gentle hot-bed, under a hand-glass, in sand; but they will require to be well covered up in severe frosty weather, so that the frost cannot injure them ; as soon as rooted, they should be potted off, as the sand will injure their roots if they stay too longin it; then they should be placed in a close frame till they have taken fresh root, and must be hardened to the air by degrees. August and September is the best time for putting in the cuttings, they will then be rooted by spring, or many of them ; or if they are put in early in spring, just as they are beginning to push out young wood, they will succeed equally well.

E.

Eb e n u s is a Papilionaceous genus, belonging to the tribe of Hedysarete; its species succeed well in

an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings nearly ripened, and planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass, will strike root; seeds are also frequently ripened, by which they are readily raised.

Eccremocarpus is a genus of climbing plants, belonging to Bignoniaceas; its species are very desirable plants for a greenhouse or conservatory, with their long tubular flowers; any rich light soil will suit them well; and young cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil.

Echeveri a is a genus of succulent plants belonging to CrassulacccB; some of the species are very handsome, and are hardy greenhouse plants; some of them being almost hardy, succeeding very well in a warm border, if covered up in severe frosty weather; a mixture of an equal proportion of light turfy loam, peat, and sand, suits them very well; and cuttings, taken off, and dried a little before planting, will soon strike root.

Echinocactus is a genus of the Cactese, mostly consisting of very spiny plants; they succeed well in a mixture of old lime and brick rubbish, mixed with some light loam; the greenhouse species are chiefly natives of Mexico, many of them are easily increased by offsets.

Echites is a genus belonging to Apocineae; its species thrive best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings will root freely, under a handglass, in sand.

Echium is a pretty genus belonging to the Bora-

gineae: a mixture of loam and peat suits the species very well; and cuttings may be struck in the same kind of soil under a hand-glass, but they are most readily increased by layers, which strike very soon if laid down in the young wood, and a little nick cut in the shoot. They may be also raised from seeds, which are frequently produced.

Edwa rdsi a is a pretty genus belonging to the Pa-pilionaceae. It is hardy enough to survive through our winters out of doors, when they are not very severe; but the species are best protected under a frame, or if planted in a conservatory; they generally ripen seeds, by which they are readily increased: they may be also raised from young cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in sand.

Ehreti a belongs to the Boragineae; the greenhouse species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil, will strike root freely.

Ehrhartia is a genus of Grasses, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and is increased by dividing at the root, or by seed.

Ekebergia is a genus belonging to the Meliacese: it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass; but their leaves must not be shortened.

E l.-eoc a r p u s cyemeus is a beautiful shrub from New Holland: it thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and is well adapted for a conservatory. Ripened cuttings strike root readily in

sand, under a hand-glass, and ripe seeds are often produced.

El^odendrum australe is another New Holland shrub, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings will soon root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Elegia is a rush-like genus belonging to the Res-tiaceae: its species thrive best in peat soil, and are increased by dividing at the root.

Elephantopus is a genus belonging to the Composite, which grows freely in loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in the same kind of soil, will root readily.

Empleurum belongs to the Diosmeas tribe of Ru-taceae. It grows freely in sandy peat; and cuttings strike root readily under a bell-glass, in sand.

En celia is a genus of Composite; its species succeed well in any light rich soil; and young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, in the same sort of soil, strike root readily.

EnchyljEna belongs to the Chenopodee, and succeeds well in any light sandy soil; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, under handglasses, will soon strike root.

Enkianthus is a beautiful genus belonging to the Ericeae, which has been considered difficult to propagate : the difficulty is now removed, as ripened cuttings root readily, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, without bottom heat. The best soil for them is an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and care must be

taken not to overwater them when not in a growing state : when they become pretty large, they are the greatest ornaments for the greenhouse or conservatory.

Entelea is a New Zealand genus, belonging to the Tiliacea?; it thrives well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of sandy loam and peat suits it very well; young cuttings root readily, planted in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass; seeds also ripen freely.

Epacris is a handsome New Holland genus, which thrives best in a very sandy peat soil; the rougher and more turfy the soil is, the better the plants will thrive: these should always be shifted in fresh pots, before they are turned out of doors in spring, as their roots are so very fine, and are generally matted round the pots, so that the hot sun coming against the pots destroys them, and they look brown all through the summer, and are very difficult to recover. Young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under bell-glasses, in autumn, or winter, or early in spring, will strike root freely; but they will not strike so readily in summer: when rooted they should be potted singly in small pots, and set in a close frame, and must be hardened to the air by degrees.

Erica is the genus to which the numerous Cape Heaths belong; they are not at present in so much repute as formerly, which is chiefly owing to the supposed difficulty of managing and propagating them ; the greatest difficulty is in procuring good

peat soil for them, and they will not thrive without it; the free growing kinds thrive best in good black peat, and like largish pots to grow in. The dwarf and hard-wooded kinds like a very sandy peat, and smaller pots, well drained with broken potsherds, and rough bits of turfy peat; they also require less water than the free growing kinds, as they grow chiefly at the Cape on the tops and sides of mountains, and in the crevices of rocks, and such like situations, chiefly in very sandy soil, and but little of it; they all require a great deal of air, and must not be crowded too thick together. Too much fire heat in winter will hurt them as much as any thing, as they only require to be kept from frost: most of the kinds might be preserved through the winter in frames: the only difficulty is to keep the damp from them. Cuttings of most species strike readily, by taking oflf the very tender tops of the shoots, and planting them in sand, under bell-glasses. The strong growing sorts require the cuttings to be rather larger than the others, and some of the stunted growing kinds should be kept in the hot-house a little while when they begin to grow, to draw them to a sufficient length of young wood, or cuttings cannot be procured ; as soon as rooted they should be potted off, and treated as recommended for the last genus.

Erigeron belongs to the Compositae. The greenhouse kinds grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily under a hand-glass.

Erinus is a pretty genus belonging to the Scrophu-lariiiEe. The greenhouse kinds thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings soon strike root under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil.

Eriocephalus is a genus which belongs to the Composite. It grows freely in loam and peat, or any light rich soil; and cuttings strike easily under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil.

Eriochilus is a New Holland genus of Orchideas, which will thrive best in an equal mixture of light turfy loam, peat, and sand ; and if grown in pots, they must be well drained at the bottom, that the wet might pass off regularly, or they might be cultivated in a pit or frame, or in a south border, in the same manner as recommended for other New Holland and Cape Orchideous plants.

Eriocoma is a genus belonging to Compositae, consisting of autumnal flowering plants; and which will endure our winters in the open air, with a very little protection. E. fragrans succeeds well in a warm border in Mr. Barclay’s garden at Bury Hill, where it flowers annually in the autumn, and the scent of its flowers are delightful; it may be increased by seeds; or young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses as early as they can be obtained in spring, will root freely.

Eriospermum is a tuberous rooted genus belonging to the Asphodeleae. The species thrive best in an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand, and are increased by offsets from the roots, or by seeds.

Eriostemon is a pretty genus belonging to the Diosmeee tribe of Rutacese; its species succeed best in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand ; and young cuttings strike root freely in a pot of sand, under a bell-glass ; the genus is nearly related to the Cape genus Adenandra, which has been referred to it by some botanists.

Erodium is a genus belonging to the Geraniaceae. The greenhouse kinds thrive best in a mixture of sandy loam and leaf mould, and are increased by young cuttings, planted in pots of the same kind of soil, and not covered with glasses; they may be also propagated by cuttings of the roots, or by seeds.

Ekythhin a is a handsome flowering genus belonging to the Papilionaceaj; most of its species require the heat of the stove, but there are also a few that will thrive in the greenhouse, as E. her-bacea, laurifolia, and crista-galli, and two species lately introduced from the Cape. E. laurifolia, as well as E. crista-galli, succeeds well by the side of a south wall, so as to be covered with a little dry litter in winter; they also grow stronger by that means, and their brilliant flowers are more numerous and of a richer colour. They will all grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and young cuttings will root readily, under a handglass, in sand.

Escallonia is a handsome genus of evergreen shrubs, natives of various parts of South America ; the greater part are hardy greenhouse plants,

and some of them will stand our winters well by the side of a wall, with the protection of a mat in winter, thriving well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; cuttings as soon as the wood is ripened, if taken off and planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Eucalyptus is an extensive genus of the Myrta-ceae, mostly natives of New Holland, where many of them grow to large timber trees. They are fine plants for a large conservatory, as they grow very fast, and are generally well clothed with beautiful foliage; they will also flower freely, when of a moderate size. The best soil for them is a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings of them may be struck in sand, under a bell-glass; but they are not so free to root, as most of this natural order are.

Euch.y.tis is one of the Cape genera divide^ from Diosma; it succeeds well in a sandy peat soil; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand early in spring, or in autumn, will root readily.

Euchilus obcordatus is a pretty little plant belonging to the Papilionaceae; it thrives best in an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand; and young cuttings root freely under a bell-glass, in sand.

Euclea is a Cape genus which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Eucomis is a bulbous genus from the Cape, which grows freely in any rich light soil, and is propa-

gated by offsets from the bulbs; or leaves stripped off close to the bulb, and planted in pots of mould, will produce bulbs at their base.

Eugeni a grows freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Euonymus belongs to the Celastrineae; the greenhouse species thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root freely in a pot of sand, under a hand glass.

Eupatorium is a genus belonging to the Compo-sitae ; the greenhouse species succeed well in a mixture of turfy loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil.

Euphorbia is a polymorphous genus; its species being very dissimilar to each other: the succulent kinds require but little water, and poor sandy soil to grow in; the other sorts like a rich light soil, and plenty of moisture. Cuttings of most kinds root freely; but the succulent kinds should be laid to dry a few days before planting, to dry up the wound, or they are liable to rot: by sticking them in a tan-bed they will root readily.

Eustegia is a Cape genus belonging to Asclepia-deae; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings nearly ripened will root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Eustrephus is a climbing genus from New Holland, belonging to the Asphodeleae; it thrives well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and

is increased by dividing the roots; or cuttings will strike root in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass; seeds are also sometimes ripened.

Eutaxia is a pretty decandrous Papilionaceous genus; it thrives best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat When the plants are young they should be topped frequently, to make them grow bushy, or they are apt to run up naked and unsightly. Young cuttings strike root freely in sand, under a bell-glass.

Euthales trinervis is a handsome little plant belonging to the Goodenovise ; it thrives best in sandy loam and peat, and care must be taken not to overwater it, as it is very delicate ; it may be increased, but sparingly, by dividing at the root, or by seed.

Ex a cum belongs to the Gentianese ; it thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass: it also produces plenty of seeds, by which it is readily increased.

ExcrECARiA belongs to the Euphorbiaceae: it will grow freely in any light rich soil, and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass.

Exocarpus is a New Holland genus, belongingto Osyrideae; an equal mixture of light sandy loam and peat is the best soil for the different species; and nearly ripened cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, and a bell-glass placed over them, will strike root freely.

F.

Fabricia is a genus belonging to the Myrtaceae: its species are well suited for a conservatory, as they require to grow to a good size before they produce any flowers: they thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings will root readily under a bell-glass, in sand.

Fagelia is a pretty climbing Papilionaceous Cape genus, well suited for a climber for the greenhouse or conservatory; it has been originally ranked with Glycine, till that polymorphous genus was divided into several genera by M. De Candolle, in the second volume of his Prodromus: the present plant succeeds well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, with a bell-glass placed over them, will soon strike root.

Fagonia belongs to the Zygophylleae; the shrubby species thrive well in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand; and cuttings will root readily in a pot of sand, placed under a hand-glass.

Falkia repcns is a little creeping plant belonging to the Convolvulaceae: it grows freely in loam and peat, or any light soil; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass..

Farsetia is a genus belonging to the Cruciferae: the greenhouse kinds grow freely in sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings strike root readily in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass.

Ferdinandia is a genus of the Compositae; its

x 2

species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, or any other light soil; and young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, in the same sort of soil, will root freely.

Ff.kraria is a tuberous Cape genus belonging to the Irideae; like Antholyza, and others of the tribe, it would succeed well in a pit: or planted in sandy soil, in a warm south border, we believe it would succeed well, only the bulbs should be planted 6 or 8 inches deep, and should be covered with a little dry litter in severe weather. If grown in pots, a mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for the various species, and they should be kept without water, after they have done growing, till they begin to grow again; when they may be planted in fresh pots, and regularly watered; they are increased by offsets from the bulbs, or by seeds.

Ficus, or the Fig-tree genus, grows freely in loam and peat, or any light rich soil; and cuttings strike root readily under a hand-glass, in sand.

Fieldia is a New Holland genus of Bignoniaceae; it succeeds well in a mixture of light sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings will root readily in the same kind of soil, or in sand, under a handglass, but their leaves must not be shortened.

Fl.indehsja is a New Holland genus belonging to Cedreleae: it grows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will not be difficult to root.

Forskohlea is a genus belonging to the Urticeae: the greenhouse species grow freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted under handglasses, in the same sort of soil,will soon strike root.

Fran ken i a belongs to Frankeniaceae; the greenhouse species are pretty plants, and thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily, under a hand-glass.

Franseria is a genus of Compositae, and grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and cuttings strike readily in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass.

Friesia belongs to the Elaeocarpeai: itgrows freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Fuchsia is a beautiful genus of South American and Mexican plants; many species are at present in our collections, and more may soon be expected: they will thrive in any light rich soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them as well as any; and young cuttings strike root freely under a hand-glass, but the glasses must be taken off to give them air occasionally, or they are very apt to damp, particularly F. lyciodes.

Furcriea is a succulent genus related to Agave, and belongs to the order of the Bromeliae; it thrives best in a loamy soil, and requires but little water; it is propagated by offsets from the roots, or leaves stripped off, and laid to dry, till x 3

they become withered, will, when planted, produce young plants at their base.

G.    •

G a la x i a is a genus of Cape bulbs belonging to the Iridese, which thrives best in a mixture of sandy loam and decayed leaves, or peat soil; the species require no water after they have done flowering, till they begin to grow again; when they should be fresh potted, and kept in a cool place till they are well rooted, then they may be regularly watered, and treated like the other plants of the order; they are increased by offsets from the bulbs, or by seeds.

Galenia is a genus belonging to the Chenopodeae, which grows freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings will strike root readilyunder a hand-glass.

Gardenia isabeautiful genus belonging to the Ru-biaceee, which thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat. The double-flowered varieties of G. jiorida and G. radicans are much cultivated for the beauty and fragrance of their flowers: the best way to flower them in perfection, is to set them in spring, in a close frame, on a little bottom heat, but not plunge the pots; in winter they may be set in the greenhouse. Cuttings of all the kinds root readily, under a hand-glass, in sand, on a little bottom heat.

Gasteri a is a genus divided from Aloe; the whole, or mostly all of the species are distichous, produ-

cing their leaves, more or less, regular in two rows, and being of a very succulent nature, they require but little water, when not in a free growing state; the best soil for them is sandy loam, mixed with old lime or brick rubbish; and they may be increased by suckers, or by the leaves, which will produce young plants from their base, the same as Furcrcea, and Aloe.

Gastrocarpha is a curious genus belonging to the Labiate® tribe of Compositae : it is of a strong scent, and a biennial plant, thriving well in any rich light soil, and will survive through the winter with the cover of a mat or pot, or any other slight covering: occasionally some of the plants will flower the first year. Plants, grown in the borders, are much stronger, and produce a much greater number of flowers, than those grown in pots. Seeds ripen freely, when the plants flower early enough in the season.

Gastrolobium is a pretty decandrous Papilionaceous genus, native of New Holland : an equal mixture of very sandy loam and peat suits it best; and young cuttings will root in sand, under a hand-glass. It sometimes ripens its seeds, by which it is readily increased.

G astkon em a is a pretty genus belonging to Ama-ryllideae : it succeeds best in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand ; and will succeed well in a frame or pit, or in a warm border, in the open air, to be planted about 4 inches deep, and to be covered with a mat, or some other slight covering x 4

in severe weather: but to be always exposed when the weather is mild : if grown in the greenhouse, it will require scarcely any water when not in a growing state, but a constant supply when growing freely, or when in bloom : a great many of the Cape bulbs, and those from other temperate climates, may have their season changed, by a little contrivance, so that they may stay out of the ground all the winter, and be replanted in spring.

Gaya belongs to the Malvaceae: its species succeed well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of rich loam and peat; they may be increased by seeds, which ripen plentifully, or by young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, in sand or mould.

Gazan i a is a showy flowering genus belonging to the Compositae: its species will thrive in any light rich soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them very well; and cuttings root freely in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass.

Geissorhjza is a Cape genus belonging to the Iri-deae; and requires the same treatment as Galaxia, Gladiolus, &c.

Gelsem ium sempervirensbelongs to the Apocyneae; it is a pretty greenhouse climber, and grows free-lyin a mixtureof loam and peat; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, or bell-glass, in sand.

Genetyllis belongs to the Chamaelauciea™ tribe of Myrtaceae : it is a New Holland genus, and succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand ; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass, will soon strike root.

Genista is a Papilionaceous genus: the greenhouse kinds thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings will root freely under a bell-glass, in sand, so that the glasses are kept wiped occasionally, that they may not damp ; they also ripen seeds in plenty.

Geranium consists chiefly of hardy herbaceous plants; the few greenhouse kinds thrive best in a mixture of loam and peat, or any light vegetable soil; they are readily increased by cuttings, planted in the same kind of soil, or from cuttings of the roots. They also ripen seeds freely, by which they are easily increased.

Gerberia is a pretty genus of Cape herbaceous plants, belonging to Compositae ; its species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Gethyllis is a bulbous genus from the Cape, related to the Amaryllideae; they thrive best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and require but little water when not in a growing state: they are increased by offsets from the bulbs, or by seeds.

Gilliesi a is a curious genus belonging to the Jun-ceie, and will succeed well in a warm border, with a little protection in severe weather; or it may be grown in pots in the greenhouse. We saw it in flower very strong in a warm border, in the collection of Mr. Barclay, atBury-hill, last autumn; a mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil

for it: but it is scarcely worth growing, except in the gardens of the curious.

Ginginsia belongs to the Portulaceae : it is a genus of neat little Cape plants, which thrive best in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand; and young cuttings, planted under bell-glasses, will strike root: seeds are also frequently produced.

Gladiolus is a genus consisting chiefly of Cape bulbs: the species thrive best in a mixture of very sandy loam, and decayed leaves or peat soil, and require no water after they have done flowering, till they begin to grow afresh. In the month of October they should be taken out of their pots, and replanted in fresh soil, when they should be set in a cool frame, or some such place, as they require only to be protected from frost, till such time as their pots are full of young roots: then they may be set in a warmer situation, and watered regularly, and they will flower freely: or if treated in the same manner already recommended for Antholyza, &c. they will succeed better, and flower stronger, by getting them planted in a pit, so as to be covered with lights in very cold or very wet weather; all the Cape bulbs belonging to this family succeed best in that way ; the greater part of them also succeed well, planted in a warm south border near a wall, in a very light sandy soil; the bulbs to be planted about 6 or 8 inches deep, according to their size, so as to be out of the reach of frost, and a

little dry litter to be put on them occasionally, when very severe weather; they will then flower very strong, and will well repay for the trouble that is taken with them. They are increased by offsets from the bulbs, and by seeds.

Gleichenia is a genus of Ferns; the greenhouse species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be increased bydividingat the root.

Globularia thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass.

Globulea belongs to the Crassulacese ; it is a genus of succulent plants, thriving best in a mixture of very sandy loam, and old lime or brick rubbish, and require but little water, when notin a free growing state ; cuttings laid to dry a day or two before planting, will strike root readily, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, without any covering.

Glossodia is an Orchideous genus, which thrives best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and requires but little water when not in a growing state: it is increased by offsets from the roots, or by seeds.

Glossula is another Orchideous genus, and requires the same treatment as the last.

Glycine is a Papilionaceous genus of climbing plants ; the greenhouse kinds grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings strike readily in sand, under a bell-glass, in a gentle bottom heat.

Gnaphalium is a pretty genus belonging to the

Composite; its flowers are known by the name of Everlasting Flowers, from their colours remaining fresh for years after being dried, which makes them generally admired: there are several greenhouse species, which thrive best in peat soil; but if peat cannot be readily procured, they will do very well in sandy loam. Cuttings strike readily taken off at a joint, and planted in the same kind of soil, and the pots placed in a shady situation, but not under hand-glasses.

Gnidia is a pretty Cape genus belonging to the Thymelae®. Its species thrive well in a sandy peat soil, with their pots well drained with broken potsherds : care must be taken not to overwater them, or to let them flag for want of water, as their roots are very tender, and are easily killed; the tenderest kinds are G. oppositifolia, G. pini-fol'ia, and G. racliata of Loddiges; the latter Mr. Loddiges mentions as very difficult to increase; but we find it one of the easiest of the genus : by taking off very young cuttings, and planting them in sand, under bell-glasses, they will soon strike root: all the other species will root in the same way; but we find G. phufolia takes the most time to strike of any.

Gomphocarpus is a Cape genus belonging to the Asclepiadeae, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, in a little bottom heat, will root freely; they may be also raised from seeds, which are produced in abundance.

Gompholobium is a beautiful decandrous genus from New Holland, belonging to the Papilio-nacea?: its species thrive best in an equal mixture of very light loam, peat, and sand, and care must be taken not to overwater them, as they are tender delicate plants, and difficult to preserve. Youngcuttingsrootwithoutdifficulty, under a bell glass, in sand; seeds are also frequently ripened.

Goodenia is a New Holland genus, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root freely under a hand-glass: they may be also raised from seeds, which ripen plentifully.

Goodia is another New Holland genus belonging to the Papilionacete : it thrives well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings root freely under a bell-glass, in sand: seeds often ripen plentifully, by which they are easily raised.

Gordonia is a North American genus belonging toTernstrcemiaceae, hardy enough tobear our winters in the open air; but the young shoots often get injured, and the summer is not long enough to flower them in perfection ; it is therefore better to treat them as greenhouse plants. Peat soil suits them best, and a little loam mixed with it: they are readily propagated by layers, or ripened cuttings maybe struck in sand,under a hand-glass.

Grammitis is a genus of Ferns: the greenhouse species grow freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and are increased by dividing at the root.

Grevillea is a pretty New Holland genus belong-

ing to the Proteaceae: its species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand. Ripened cuttings root without difficulty under a handglass, in sand; and seeds often ripen in abundance on some of the species.

Grewi a thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings will root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Grielum is a genus belonging to the Geraniaceae, which thrives best in sandy gravel: the pots must be well drained, as nothing injures them more than too much wet; and cuttings will root in the same kind of soil without glasses : seeds will be produced, if a little pains be taken to attach the pollen to the stigmas when in bloom.

Grin deli a (Do/iia of Hortus Kcwensis) is a genus belonging to the Composite ; which thrives well in any light rich soil; and young cuttings root freely in the same kind of soil, under handglasses. The species may be also raised from seeds, which ripen plentifully.

Gunner a perpeusa is a Cape genus, which grows freely in loam and peat: it is best treated as a water plant to have it in perfection; and is increased by dividing it at the root.

H.

Habranthus belongs to the Amaryllideae; some of the species are stove plants, others succeed well in the greenhouse; and some will stand well

in frames, or in a warm border, with a little protection in severe frost: the best soil for the different species is a mixture of two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third peat: the bulbs may be taken up in autumn, and re-planted in spring: they may be increased by offsets from the roots, or by seeds, which are sometimes ripened in abundance. H.emanthus is a genus of bulbs from the Cape, belonging to the Amaryllideae: the species thrive best in sandy loam, and a little peat. They require no water when in a dormant state, as the bulbs then ripen and flower freely; they are increased by offsets from the bulbs. emodorum is a New Holland genus, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and is increased by dividing at the roots.

Hakea is also a New Holland genus belonging to the Proteacese, which thrives well in a mixture of one-third loam, one-third peat, and the rest sand, mixed together; the pots must be well drained, that the plants may not be soddened with too much water. Ripened cuttings strike root readily under a hand-glass, in sand; numerous species are now in the collections, and many of them bear sweet-scented flowers,and are therefore desirable. Halleria is a pretty genus belonging to the Scro-phularinae: it grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings strike root readily in sand, under a hand-glass. Hallia is a pretty Papilionaceous genus, native of the Cape: its species grow freely in a mixture

of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings will strike root under a bell-glass, in sand.

Haloragis thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Hartogia is a Cape genus, belonging to Celas-trineae; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings will root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Hebenstreiti a is a Cape genus, belonging to the Selagineae: its species thrive best in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings strike root readily in the same kind of soil, under a handglass, or in a shady situation, without a glass.

Heimia is a pretty genus, belonging to Lythrarias: its species grow freely in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings, nearly ripened, will root readily under a hand-glass, in sand; they are. sufficiently hardy to stand our winters in the open borders, with the covering of a mat in severe weather.

H e l i a n x h e m u m is a very handsome genus, belonging to the Cistineae; several of its species require the protection of a greenhouse or frames, to preserve them through the winter. A mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for them, and they may be increased by seeds; or nearly ripened cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will strike root readily.

Helichrysum is a handsome genus, belonging to Compositae; its species were originally arranged

under Gnaphalium and Xeranthemum,but those two genera have lately been divided into several more natural ones by Mr. David Don: the best soil for them is two-thirds peat soil, and one-third sandy loam: cuttings of most species strike root readily, taken off at a joint, and planted in pots in the same sort of soil: several of the species also produce an abundance of seeds.

Heliophila is a pretty Cape genus, belonging to the Crucifera; the greenhouse kinds grow freely in sandy loam and peat, and they may be increased by seeds; or young cuttiegs, planted under a hand glass, will root readily.

Heliotropium belongs to the Boragineae; some of its species are much valued for the fragrance of their flowers, so that they are to be met with in most collections: they will thrive well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings will root freely under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil.

Hemigenia is a New Holland genus, belonging to Labiatae; it grows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots, in the same sort of soil, root freely.

Hemimeris belongs to the Scrophularinas; it grows freely in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots, in the same sort of soil, or under hand-glasses, will soon strike root.

Herbertia is a pretty bulbous genus belonging to the Irideae, natives of the neighbourhood of Buenos Ayres: the different species succeed well in a mix-

Y

ture of an equal quantity of loam, peat, and sand, and most of them ripen seeds freely: a frame or warm border suits them as well as the greenhouse, with the protection of a mat or some other slight covering in severe frosty weather, or if there should be a superabundance of moisture.

Hermannia is a genus from the Cape: most of the species are free growers, and easily managed; and any light rich soil will suit them, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings of any of the kinds, planted under a hand-glass, in the same kind of soil, will soon strike root.

Hermas is an umbelliferous genus, also native of the Cape, which will thrive in any light soil; and may be increased by dividing them at the root, or by cuttings, planted under a hand-glass.

Herniaria is a genus belonging to the Amaran-thacese: it thrives well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Herreria is a genus of climbing plants belonging to Asphodeleae: its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam, peat, and sand, and are increased by dividing the root, or by seeds.

Hesperanth a is a genus belonging to the Irideae, and requires the same treatment as Gladiolus, Ixia, &c.

Heteromorph a is a Cape genus belonging to Um-bellifer*: it succeeds well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in a pot of the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, will strike root readily.

Hexaglottis is a bulbous genus of the Irideae, and requires precisely the same sort of treatment as Ixia, Gladiolus, and Moraea.

Hibbertia is a New Holland genus, belonging to the Dilleniace*, which thrives best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in the same kind of soil.

Hibiscus is a genus belonging to the Malvacea?, consisting chiefly of stove plants : the few greenhouse kinds thrive well in any rich light soil; and cuttings root freely in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass: they also generally ripen their seeds, by which they are readily increased.

Hippia belongs to the Composite, which grows freely in any light soil; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will strike root readily.

Hippocrepis is a Papilionaceous genus. H. balc-arica is the only greenhouse kind, which thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike freely under a hand-glass.

Ho a rea is a genus belonging to the Geraniaceae, generally known by the name of bulbous Geraniums. The species are all tuberous rooted, and nothing will injure them so much as too much wet: when they have done flowering, and become dormant, they require no more water till they begin to grow afresh, when they should be shifted into fresh soil, the old being all shaken from the roots; the best soil for them is a third of turfy loam, rather more than a third of fine y 2

sand, and the rest peat; by keeping them pretty-warm when they begin to grow, and watering them when they are dry, they will begin to flower early in spring, and will continue in bloom all the summer with proper management, and will ripen their seeds. Many handsome mules have been raised from seeds of this genus, which grow more freely, and appear to be more hardy than the original species. They are increased by little tubers of the roots, taken off and planted with their tops above the mould; these require to be kept quite dry, till the wound is healed over, and they begin to grow; they may then be watered regularly, and may soon be single potted, in small pots, and will flower the same summer.

Hoffm anseggia is a Leguminous genus, belonging to the tribe of Cassieae: its species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and will succeed well in the open air, with a little protection in winter.

Hoitzia is a beautiful genus belonging to the Po-lemoniaceae; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, in the same sort of soil, or in pots, will root freely.

Homeria is a beautiful genus of Cape bulbs, related to Morsea: its species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand; to be kept dry. when not in a growing state, but to be well supplied with water when growing freely: they succeed much better planted out in a pit or

frame, with other rather tender bulbs; to be covered up with a mat or other slight covering in winter, or they may be planted in a warm border of the flower-garden: requiring covering only in severe frosty weather: the large bulbs may be planted full six inches deep, the smaller ones not so deep; and by a little perseverance, those, and many other half hardy bulbs, may be brought to grow early in spring; and as soon as the leaves are died down, to take them up, and keep them in a dry cool place, but out of the reach of frost till the following spring.

Houttuynia is a China plant belonging to the Aroideae; it requires to be grown in water, in any light rich soil, and maybe propagated by dividing at the root, or by seed.

Hovea is a pretty Papilionaceous genus from New Holland; its species thrive best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings may be struck under a bell-glass, in sand: they frequently also ripen seeds, by which they are readily increased; the finest species are H. Celsi and H.purpurea, which may be considered as the most desirable plants for a greenhouse or conservatory.

Ho v em a is a Chinese fruit-tree; there is also a species from Nepaul; they grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root readily, under a hand-glass, in sand.

Hoy a belongs to the Asclepiadeae; the species are generally treated as stove plants, but some of y 3

them will thrive and flower very well in a warm part of the greenhouse. A light rich soil suits them best, but they will thrive in almost any; and cuttings, planted in a little heat, will root freely; even the leaf, taken off close to the plant, and planted in heat, will root and produce a plant.

Hudsonia is a pretty North American genus, belonging to the Cistineae, which requires to be preserved in a greenhouse or frame in winter, and thrives best in peat soil; young cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a bell-glass.

HyjEnanchf. is a Cape genus belonging to Eu-phorbiacea?: it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily, planted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Hydrangea hortensisis in general cultivation, for the sake of its showy and changeable flowers: the blue variety is generally sought after, which is easily obtained, by planting it out in a bed of peat, and letting it remain two or three years; or the longer it remains the bluer it will be: it might then be potted, before the buds begin to burst, and it will flower in perfection. Cuttings root freely, planted under a hand-glass.

Hydropeltis is a water plant, which requires the protection of a greenhouse or frame to preserve it through the winter; planted in a pot or tub of water, so that its leaves may float above the surface ; any loamy soil will suit it; and it will flower prettily.

Hyoscyamus belongs to the Solaneae: the green-

house kinds grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat, or any light soil; and cuttings strike root readily under a hand-glass, or without any glass, in a shady situation.

Hvpericum is a genus which will require to be divided into several distinct ones : the greenhouse kinds thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root freely, under a bell-glass, in sand.

IIvpocalyptus is a beautiful Papilionaceous genus, with rose-coloured flowers, from the Cape, and is well worth cultivating in the greenhouse or conservatory. It thrives well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily in pots of sand, under a bell-glass.

IIypoestes is a genus belonging to Acanthaceae; the greenhouse species grow freely in any rich light soil, or a mixture of light loam and peat will suit it very well; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

II y pol.ena is a genus of Grasses from New Holland ; they succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seed; they will succeed well in an open border of the garden, if covered up a little in severe weather.

Hypoxis isagenus belonging to Ilypoxideee; some of the species are bulbous, and others tuberous-rooted. An equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, or decayed leaves, suits them best, and they y 4

require no water after they have done growing till they begin to grow afresh, when they should be fresh potted and regularly watered. They are increased by offsets from the bulbs and by seeds; many of them will succeed well in the open borders, with a little protection from frost.

Hy ptis belongs to the Labiate®. The greenhouse kinds thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass; they also frequently produce seeds.

I.

Ineris is a genus belonging to the Crucifer®. The greenhouse kinds grow freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted under a handglass, in the same kind of soil, will soon strike root.

Ilex, or the Holly tribe, belongs to Celastrine®; the greenhouse species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root freely, under a hand-glass, in sand.

Illicium, or Aniseed-tree, grows freely in a light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat, and is readily increased by layers. Ripened cuttings will also root in sand, under a hand-glass; they succeed well in the open ground, with a slight protection from frost.

Imhofia is a genus of Cape bulbs, belonging to Amaryllide®, and requires precisely the same sort of treatment as Brunsvigia.

In dig of era is a Papilionaceous genus, which

thrives best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings root freely in sand, under a bell-glass; they also frequently produce seeds, and are desirable plants for the greenhouse or conservatory.

Ipomcea is a beautiful genus belonging to the Con-volvulacea;, chiefly consisting of climbing plants: the species will thrive well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, in a little heat, will root freely; the greenhouse species are very desirable for climbers.

Ipomopsis is a pretty genus belonging to Polemo-niaceae; its species are nearly hardy, but as they seldom flower the first year, it is best to keep them under cover for the first winter, to be planted in the open borders in spring; they will then flower, and most probably will ripen a plenty of seeds.

Isopetalum belongs to the Geraniaceae; it thrives best in an equal mixture of light turfy loam, peat, and sand, and requires very little water in winter; when its leaves are beginning to drop, it should be kept quite dry for a considerable time, which will make it produce flower stems; but if kept moist and in a growing state all the winter, it will seldom flower at all. Cuttings, taken off and laid to dry for a little time to dry up the wound, will strike root freely, planted in pots, and placed on a shelf in the greenhouse, and not covered with glasses.

Isopogon is a pretty New Holland genus belong-

ing to the Proteaceae: the best soil for them is one third turfy loam, a third of peat, and a third of sand, mixed together: the pots must be well drained with potsherds broken small, as nothing injures this tribe of plants so much as the mould to be soddened with water; the roots are also fond of running amongst the broken potsherds. Ripened cuttings maybe rooted, though not without difficulty, under a hand-glass, in sand ; but the glass must be often taken off to give them air, as they are very liable to damp.

Ixia is a bulbous genus belonging to the Irideae : the best soil for them is a mixture of sandy loam and decayed leaves, or peat soil; when they have done flowering, they require no water till they begin to grow afresh. In the month of October they should be fresh potted, and set in a cool frame, as they only require to be protected from frost till their pots are well filled with roots: then they may be set on the shelves in the greenhouse, or any convenient situation, and be watered regularly, and they will flower well; the species of this genus, as is already mentioned under Gladiolus, and some other bulbous rooted genera, will succeed best in a pit, and to be covered with lights in very cold or very wet weather; most of the species will also succeed well in a south border, in the open air, planted about 5 or 6 inches deep, in a light sandy soil, near a wall or fence; and to be covered with some dry litter in severe

weather; they will then flower much stronger than if grown in pots; and they may be increased by offsets from the bulbs, or by seeds.

Ixouia is a pretty New Holland genus belonging to the Composite, with glossy white flowers: it thrives best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings root freely in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass.

J.

Jacksonia is a pretty Papilionaceous genus from New Holland, which thrives best in sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings may be struck in sand, under a bell-glass, or ripened ones, under a hand-glass.

Jasminum is a genus in great esteem, on account of the exquisite fragrance of their flowers: they all thrive well in any light loamy soil, or a mixture of loam and peat suits them very well; and cuttings root freely in sand, or mould, under a hand-glass.

Jenkinsonia is a pretty genus belonging to Ge-raniaceae; J. quinata requires a warm part of the greenhouse, or cool dry part of a stove, to keep it in health in winter: the best soil for it and the other species, is an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand; and young cuttings, taken off at a joint, root freely, planted in pots of the same sort of soil, and placed on a shelf in the greenhouse, in spring.

/

Jonidium belongs to the Violarieee: its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings will root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Justicia is a pretty genus belonging to the Acan-thaceae ; it thrives well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike freely, under a hand-glass, in sand.

K.

KALANCHOEisa pretty genus belonging toCrassu-laceae: its species succeed well in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand; and the pots to be well drained with small pieces of potsherd, that the moisture may pass off readily: they require very little water when not in a free growing state, but a constant supply when growing freely: cuttings, taken off and laid to dry for two or three days before planting, will strike root in a few days.

Kennedy a is a pretty Papilionaceous genus of climbing plants from New Holland, well suited for the climbers of a conservatory or greenhouse: the best soil for them is a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings root freely, in sand, under a bell-glass, in a little bottom heat.

Kerri a japonica is a genus belonging to the Rosa-ceae, till lately confounded with Corchoi'us: it is hardy enough to endure our winters in the open air, but does not flower in such perfection aswhen kept in the greenhouse, where it is well deserving a place. Any light rich soil will suit it; and young cuttings soon root under a hand-glass.

Kiggelari a is a Cape genus, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in sand, will root readily.

King [A is the curious Grass-tree from New Holland: itsucceds well in a mixture of loam, peat, and sand, and may be increased by suckers, or from seeds when they can be procured.

Knowltonia is a genus belonging to the Ranun-culacese: it grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat, and is increased by dividing it at the root, or by seeds.

Knoxia belongs to the Rubiaceai: the greenhouse species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in the same sortof soil,under hand-glasses,will soon strike root.

Kolbea belongs to the Melanthaceae : it is the 7m-lipa Breyniana of the Botanical Magazine, and Melanthium uniflorum of Willdenow: it succeeds well in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand, and may be increased by offsets from the root, or by seeds : the bulbs will succeed well in a frame or pit, or planted out in a bed or border of light sandy soil, in February or March ; and as soon as they have done flowering, and their foliage is withered up, they may be taken up, and kept dry till the following spring.

L.

Lachenalia is a genus of Cape bulbs belonging to the Asphodeleae; they thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat, or decayed leaves, requiring but little water when not in a growing state. They are increased by offsets from the bulbs, or by seeds.

Lachn.ea is a pretty Cape genus belonging to the Thymelasae, which thrives only in a sandy peat; and young cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in sand, will root freely.

Lagerstr(emia belongs to the Lytharieae : the L. indica is a native of China, and will endure our winters in the open air, planted against a wall, with the protection of a mat, or some other slight covering, in severe frosty weather, where it will produce its bunches of splendid flowers in summer : a large plant is treated in this way, at the Nursery of Messrs. Whitley, Brames, and Milne, at Fulham : it is more difficult to flower in the stove, as it becomes drawn up weak with too much heat, and is generally grown in small pots, not allowed room to grow large enough for flowering: young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, or a mixture of loam and peat, and placed under a handglass, on a little heat, will soon strike root.

Lambertia is a handsome genus from New Holland, belonging to the Proteaceae; its species thrive best in an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand; and care must be taken not to over-

water them. Ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, just before they begin to grow afresh, will root without difficulty, if planted in sand, under a hand-glass ; too many must not be put together in the same pot, as they are very liable to damp ; and the glasses must be taken off occasionally, to give them air.

Lanaria is a Cape genus belonging to the Haemo-doraceae, which thrives best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and is increased by dividing it at the root.

Larrea is a genus belonging to Zygophylleas; its species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; andcuttings, nearly ripened, willstrike root readily in pots of sand, placed under a handglass.

Lasiopetalum is a New Holland genus, which grows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will strike root readily.

Laurophyllus is a pretty Cape shrub, with fine foliage, but its flowers are inconspicuous ; a mixture of loam and peat suits it very well; and ripened cuttings strike readily, under a handglass, in sand.

La l'rus thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings strike root without difficulty in sand, under a hand-glass; but they must have air occasionally, or they will be liable to damp.

Lavandula, or Lavender, belongs to the Labiatse: the greenhouse kinds succeed well in any light

rich soil; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in the same kind of soil, will strike root freely.

Lava ter a is a genus belonging to the Malvaceae: the greenhouse species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat, or any light rich soil; and ripened cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass, will soon strike root; they may be also raised from seeds, which ripen abundantly.

LEBECKiAisa Papilionaceous genus from the Cape, which thrives well in sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in sand, under a bell-glass, will root freely.

Lechenaultia is a pretty genus from New Holland, belonging to Goodenoviae ; it thrives well in a mixture of light turfy loam, peat, and sand ; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil, will soon strike root.

Leonotis is a genus belonging to the Labiatae, whose beautiful flowers in autumn make them very desirable: the species will thrive in any light rich soil; and young cuttings will strike root readily, under a hand-glass.

Leontice is a genus belonging to the Berberideaa, which grows best in a mixture of loam and peat; and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Lepidium is a genus belonging to the Cruciferae: the greenhouse kinds thrive well in any light soil; and are readily increased by cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, or by seeds.

Leptocarpus is a genus belonging to Restiaceae; its species grow freely in an equal mixture of light sandy loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root.

Leptomeria is a New Holland genus belonging to Santalaceae; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and are increased by ripened cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Leptospermum is a New Holland genus belonging to the Myrtaceae, which grows well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings will strike root readily in sand, under a bell-glass ; the species may also be raised from seeds ; but plants from cuttings are best, as they flower young, and the seedlings do not flower till they attain a considerable size.

Lepyrooia is a genus of Restiaceae ; requiring the same treatment as Leptocarpus.

Lespedeza is agenus belonging to the Iledysareae tribe of Papilionaceae; many of the species are hardy; the greenhouse species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, or bell-glass, will soon strike root.

Lessertia is a pretty Papilionaceous genus, native of the Cape. A mixture of sandy loam and peat suits it best; and young cuttings may be struck under a bell-glass, in sand, or they may be raised from seeds, which sometimes ripen; several of the species are annual.

z

Leucaijendron is a dioecious genus belonging to the Proteaceae; the best soil for it is a light loam mixed with nearly one half sand; the pots should be well drained with broken potsherds, and care must be taken not to overwater them. Ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, early in spring, and planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will strike root without difficulty.

Leuceri a belongs to the Labiatiflorae tribe of Com-positae; it grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat, or any rich light soil, and will stand our winters in the open borders,with a little protection in severe frost; it may be increased by seeds ; or young cuttings, planted in the common soil, will root readily, under a hand-glass.

Leucocoryne is a bulbous genus belonging to As-phodeleae; its species will thrive well in an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand; and will succeed well, planted in a frame or pit, or in a warm sheltered border, so as to be protected from severe frost by a mat, or other slight covering; and may be increased by seeds.

Leucopogon is a New Holland genus belonging to the Epacrideae: the species thrive best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and the tops of the very young shoots taken off for cuttings, and planted in sand, under a bell-glass, will root freely.

Leucospermum is a beautiful flowering genus, belonging to the Proteaceae: the species require the same treatment as Leucadendron, and Protea.

Leucosteaima is a fine genus belonging to Com-

positac, and consists of L. vcstitum, and L. lingula turn ; it was separated from Helichrysum by Mr. D. Don, a genus that was before composed of numerous heterogeneous species ; some other genera will most probably have to be divided from it and Gnaphalium, when the species have all undergone an examination : the best soil for them is a mixture of two-thirds sandy peat, and one-third loam; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass, will root freely, but air must be admitted frequently, or they will be apt to damp off.

Le y sera is a Cape genus belonging to Composite: the species grow freely in peat soil, and a little loam mixed with it; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass,in the same kind of soil, will root freely.

Lia tris odoratissima requires the protection of a greenhouse, or even a stove, to flower it in perfection ; any light rich soil will suit it; and it may be increased by dividing it at the root, or by seeds.

Libf.rtia is a New Holland genus, belonging to Irideae; it is the Renealmia of Mr. Brown ; but as the original genus of Renealmia has been established by Mr. Roscoe, we adopt Sprengel’s name for the present one; the species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds; they will succeed well in the open borders, with' the protection of a mat in severe frost.

Ltchtensteini a is a Cape Umbelliferous genus, to it belongs (Enantke inebrians of Thunberg; it z 2

grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and may be increased by seeds, which ripen in abundance.

Lidbeckia is a Cape genus belonging to the Composite ; any light rich soil will suit it; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Light foot i a is a Cape genus belonging to the Campanulaceae, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings will strike root readily in the same kind of soil, under a handglass ; its species also frequently produce seeds.

Li gustrum lucidum is a handsome evergreen shrub from China, rather too tender to thrive well in the open air; it is deserving a place in the conservatory, which it suits very well. A mixture of loam and peat is a proper soil for it, and it is readily increased by layers; or cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will strike root freely.

Limeum is a genus belonging to the Portulaceae : a mixture of sandy loam and peat suits it very well; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Linaria is a genus belonging to the Scrophula-rinae ; some of the species require the protection of a greenhouse, or dry frame, to preserve them through the winter, as L. tristis, triornithophora, reticulata, alpina, &c. They will all thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily, under a hand-glass.

Lin con i a is a Cape genus belonging to Bruniaceae; its species succeed best in two-thirds sandy peat,

and one-third sandy loam ; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass, will root readily.

Linds.ea is a genus of Ferns ; the greenhouse species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Ljnum, or Flax. The greenhouse species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike root readily in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass. L. trigynum is in general much infested with the red spiders : sprinkling a little sulphur-vivum on the leaves occasionally, will keep them clear off.

Liparia is a Papilionaceous genus, native of the Cape : its species thrive very well in a mixture of loam and peat, and do not require so much water as some other genera of the order: if they get too much water over their leaves they will be killed. Very young tops taken off for cuttings, and planted under a bell-glass, in sand, are not difficult to root, if the glasses are wiped regularly.

Lip pi a belongs to the Verbenaceae; its species succeed well in any rich light soil, or an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat will suit them very well; young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, in the same sort of soil, will soon strike root.

LissANTHEisapretty genus of the Stypheliae tribe of Epacrideae; its species succeed best in an equal mixture of light turfy loam, peat, and sand ; and 7. 3

very young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass, will root readily.

Loselia will thrive in any light rich soil; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Loduigesi a is a pretty Papilionaceous genus from the Cape. An equal mixture of sandy loam and peat suits it best; and young cuttings, planted in sand, under a bell-glass, will root freely.

Logania is a New Holland genus belonging to the Gentianeae : it thrives best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings may be struck in sand, under a hand-glass.

Lomaria is a genus of Ferns; the greenhouse species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and are increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Lomatia is a genus belonging to the Proteaceae: a mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for it, though some people grow it entirely in peat. Ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, and planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Lonicera, or Honeysuckle. Of this genus, L. jiava, coiifusa, and longiflora, do best as greenhouse or conservatory plants, where they grow and flower beautifully. Any common soil will suit them, or in a mixture of loam and peat they will grow freely: they may be increased rapidly by layers ; or ripened cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will soon strike root; the L. japonica

of Thunberg succeeds well in the open borders. The Chinese and Nepaul species have been very much confused in various publications; the true japonica of Thunberg is the one with red flowers; the h.JJejruosa of Botanical Register, and L. chi-nensis of Watson’s Dendrologia Britannica; the trucflexuosa of Thunberg is one of the Xylosteon tribe; the japonica of the gardens, and of several publications, is now confusa, being very different from the original japonica of Thunberg ; the japonica of Mr. Don’s Prodromus Flora Nepalensis is the longiflora. We agree with M. De Candolle in keeping them all in one genus for the present, and dividing them only into sections, as the limits of the genera are not yet properly settled.

Lophospermum is a beautiful climbing genus, belonging to Scrophularinae, well suited for a greenhouse or conservatory; or for planting out by the side of a wall or trellis in spring, which it will soon cover and ornament with its splendid flowers ; those that flower in the open air are of the finest colour. For the whole of the plants of this beautiful genus now in the country, we are indebted to the liberality of A. B. Lambert, Esq., from whose Herbarium they were all taken, and distributed to various collections, not one having been introduced by any other individual, though we see it mentioned in various publications, that the seeds had been introduced by several different persons, which is quite a mistake, no other person having introduced it but Mr. Lambert; z 4

it succeeds well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, root readily ; seeds are also frequently ripened.

Lotus is a Papilionaceous genus : the geenhouse kinds grow freely in any light rich soil; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will strike root readily; or they may be raised from seeds, which ripen in abundance.

Loureika belongs to the Euphorbiaceae; its species grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Luculia is a very handsome genus, belonging to the Cinchoneaceae tribe of Rubiaceae; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of light turfy loam and peat; and young cuttings root freely in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, on a little heat.

Lychnis is a herbaceous genus belonging to the Caryophylleae ; the species are chiefly hardy ; but L. coronata, a Chinese one, requires the protection of a greenhouse or frame to preserve it through the winter. L.fulgens, a beautiful species, proves quite hardy. Any light rich soil suits them, and they thrive in a mixture of loam and peat as well as any. Young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will soon root, and be good plants.

Lycium, or Box-thorn, belongs to the Solaneae ; several Cape species, confused under L. afrum, bear handsome flowers, and are well worth cultivating. Some of them are growing very luxuriantly at the Apothecaries’ Company’s Garden at Chelsea, where they are planted by the side of a wall, and trained up, with a very slight protection in winter; they flower there very fine, and ripen fruit; and may be considered as handsome plants for ornamenting the walls of a flower-garden. They are not easily distinguished from each other, when not in flower, but the flowers are very different. Mr. Burchell brought several sorts from the Cape, when he returned from that country. They all thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Lyonsia is a climbing genus from New Holland, belonging to Apocineae; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in pots of sand, under a hand-glass.

Lyperanthus is a New Holland genus of Orchi-dea;, which thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and would succeed as well in a pit or frame, as in the greenhouse, with a little covering in severe frost; or if planted in a warm border, with a garden pot placed over the bulbs in severe frost, and also covered with a mat, they will succeed very well.

Lysinema is a pretty genus belonging to theEpa-cridese: sandy peat is the best soil for it, the rougher the better, as the roots like to run among the turfy soil. Cuttings not too young, planted in sand, under a bell-glass, root readily.

Lythrum alatum is a pretty plant, which requires

the protection of a greenhouse or frame in winter. It grows freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

M.

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Macbuidea is a pretty Carolina genus, belonging to Labiatae; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass.

Maclura aurantiaca, or the Osage Apple, is a plant lately introduced from North America, and is nearly hardy: it grows freely in a mixture of turfy loam and peat, and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will strike root.

Magnolia is a fine genus; several species are from North America, and are mostly hardy; the Chinese kinds are generally preserved in greenhouses and frames in winter, though the deciduous ones endure our winters tolerably well in the open air : they are sometimes grown entirely in peat soil, but they thrive better with a little loam mixed with it. Many of the kinds are increased by inarching and budding on M. obovata, one of the readiest growing sorts. M. pumila, JH.fuscata, and any of the weak growing species, strike readily from cuttings, taken off as soon as ripe, and planted in 6and, under a hand-glass.

Mahernia is a pretty Cape genus belonging to thellermanniaceae: an equal mixture of loam and peat is the best soil for the different species; and young cuttings, taken off at a joint, and planted under a hand-glass, in the same kind of soil, will strike root.

Malva, or the Mallow tribe, succeeds well in any rich light soil: there are several handsome Cape species which flower abundantly, and are therefore deserving a place in any collection. Cuttings strike root freely under a bell-glass, in any light soil. They may be also raised from seeds, which are often produced.

Manulea is a Cape genus belonging to the Scro-phularinae : any light rich soil will suit the species ; and young cuttings, planted under a handglass, will root readily.

Marica is a genus belonging to the Irideae: the greenhouse kinds grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and are increased by offsets from the roots, or by seeds.

Marrubium is a genus belonging to the Labiatae: the greenhouse kinds will thrive in any light rich soil; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Marsdeni a is a genus belonging to the Asclepia-deae. M. suaveolens, a species from New South Wales, thrives well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Massonia is a genus of Cape bulbs, which grow well in an equal mixture of sand, loam, and peat, and require no water when in a dormant state.

Just before they begin to grow, they may be repotted, and the bulbs divided where there are offsets ; but they should be watered sparingly, and be placed in a cool situation, till the pots are well filled with roots, when they may be set in a warmer place, and watered regularly. They are increased by offsets from the bulbs, and by seeds ; a frame or pit, or a warm border, will suit them very well, with a little covering in frosty weather.

Mataxa isaCape genus of Composite ; succeeding best in a rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat, and young cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil.

Matiiioia is a genus belonging to the Crucifers;, divided from Cheiranthus by Mr. Brown. The greenhouse kinds will thrive in any light soil; and cuttings strike root readily, under a hand-glass.

Maurandia is a pretty climbing genus belonging to the Scrophularinae : the species will thrive well in any light rich soil, and are readily increased by seeds; or young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will soon strike root. The handsomest and hardiest species is M. Barclayana.

Mauria belongs to the Terebinthaceae ; its species grow freely in an equal mixture of light loam and peat; and cuttings, nearly ripened, will root readily in pots of sand, under a hand-glass ; or by pieces of the roots, planted with their points a little above the mould.

Maytenus belongs to the Celastrinea;: its species are chiefly natives of Peru and Chili, and are therefore nearly hardy : a mixture of loam and peat is the most proper soil for them ; and cuttings, nearly ripened, will root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Medicago arborea, or Moon Trefoil, is generally treated as a greenhouse plant; but it will endure our mildest winters in the open air: it does very well planted against a wall in a sheltered situation, and protected with a mat in severe frosts: it will thrive in any common garden soil, and is readily increased by seeds ; or cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Melaleuca is a beautiful genus belonging to the Myrtace®, chiefly from New Holland: the best soil for the species is an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat. Some cultivators grow them entirely in peat, in which they will grow very well for a time; but they will not be strong and healthy, nor flower so well as in a mixture. Ripened cuttings, not too old, will root freely in sand, under a bell-glass.

Melananthera is a genus belonging to the Com-positae, which thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings strike freely under a hand-glass.

Melanosticta belongs to the Cassieae tribe ofLe-guminosae: it succeeds well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings will root readily in pots of sand, under a bell-glass.

Melanthium is a genus of bulbs from the Cape, which thrive best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat, and require no water when not in a growing state: the species are increased by offsets from the bulbs, or from seeds.

Melasph/erula is a bulbous genus belonging to the Irideaj, which requires the same treatment as Ixia, Gladiolus, &c.

Me li a grows well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings strike readily in sand, under a hand-glass; but their leaves must not be shortened, nor too many planted in the same pot. They also produce seeds, by which they are readily increased.

Meliantiius, or Honey-flower, is a native of the Cape: it will thrive in any rich light soil; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Melichrus is a pretty genus, belonging to the Stypheliae tribe of Epacrideae; its species thrive well in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand; and very young cuttings, planted in a pot of sand, under a bell-glass, will soon strike root.

Melicope is a New Zealand genus belonging to Rutaceae: it succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, not too much ripened, root freely, in pots of sand, under a bell-glass.

Melicvtus is another New Zealand genus belonging to the Kiggelarieve tribe of Flacourtianae: it succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, nearly ripened, strike root freely, under a hand-glass.

Menispermum will thrive well in a mixture of loam

and peat; and cuttings root readily under a handglass.

Mentzelia is a genus belonging to the Loaseae: the greenhouse kinds grow well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Mesemrryanthemum is a genus of succulent plants belonging to theFicoideae; the dwarf kinds require but little water, and to be grown in small pots in a very sandy or gravelly soil. The species should be kept quite dry when in a dormant state; but when growing freely, and at the flowering season, they require a moderate supply of water. The stronger and more woody kinds may be planted in a richer soil; but the poorer the soil is, the dwarfer they will grow, and the more abundantly they will flower; they also require more water than the dwarf kinds, particularly at the flowering season, but need very little in winter. A good dry frame is sufficient to preserve them through the winter, with the covering of mats in frosty weather. Cuttings of any of them strike root readily, planted in pots of earth, and kept dry, till they begin to wither; when they may have alittle water,and they will root verysoon.

Mespilus is a genus chiefly consisting of hardy shrubs: the greenhouse kinds grow well in a mixture of loam and peat; and are readily increased by cuttings, taken off in the ripened wood, and planted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Metalasia is a Cape genus of Composite, separated from Gnaphalium: there are several species belonging to it; all of which succeed best, in a mixture of two-thirds sandy peat, and one-third loam; and cuttings, planted in pots, or under hand-glasses, in the same sort of soil, will root readily.

Metrosideros is a genus belonging to the Myr-taceae; some of the species are natives of New Holland, and the Cape: the best soil for them is a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings may be rooted, but not without difficulty, taken off in the ripened wood, and planted under a bell-glass, in sand.

Michauxia campanuloides belongs to the Campa-nulaceae: it is a native of the Levant, and biennial: it succeeds well in any rich light soil; and is only to be increased by seeds. A plant introduced to this country, in 1829, by Dr. Fischer, under the name of M. decaudra, we have had stand the two last winters with no other protection than a pot placed over it in the severe frosty weather, and always exposed to the air in mild weather: it is said to be a native of Persia: we have not yet seen any of its flowers: it probably does not properly belong to this genus.

Microdon is a genus belonging to Selagineae: they are natives of the Cape; and succeed well in an ecpial mixture of light loam, peat, and sand; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, with a bell-glass placed over them, will soon strike root.

Microloma is a genus belonging to the Asclepia-

deae, which thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a bell-glass.

M ikania is a genus belonging to the Composite: the greenhouse kinds thrive well in any light rich soil; and young cuttings, planted under a handglass, will soon strike root.

Milla belongs to the Asphodeleas; and thrives well in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand: it will succeed well in a pit or frame, or in a warm border, in a sheltered situation, with the covering of a mat, or some other slight covering in severe frost.

Mimetes is a Cape genus belonging to the Prote-aceae, which thrives best in a mixture of two-thirds light loam, and one-third sand: the pots must be also well drained with broken potsherds, that the water may pass off freely. Ripened cuttings may be struck in sand under a hand-glass; but very few must be planted in each pot, or they will cause each other to damp: the glasses must be also taken off occasionally, to give them air.

Mimulus, or Monkey flower, belongs to the Scro-phularinae: any light rich soil wijl suit the species, and they may be readily increased by seeds, which ripen in abundance. Cuttings will also root freely, planted under a hand-glass, in common mould.

Mirbelia is a pretty decandrous genus from New Holland, belonging to the Papilionaceae: the best soil for the species is an equal portion of sand,

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loam, and peat; and young cuttings root without' difficulty, in sand, under a bell-glass. Seeds sometimes ripen, by which they may be readily increased.

Mitrasacme belongs to the Gentianeae : its species succeed best in a mixture of two-thirds sandy peat, and one-third loam ; and the best way of raising them is from seeds ; those should be sown as soon as possible, as they are rather difficult to get up.

Mniarum belongs to the Scleranthese tribe of Paronychias : it succeeds well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and may be raised from seeds, or young cuttings, under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Monotoca is a New Holland genus belonging to the Styphelieae tribe of Epacrideas: an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat suits its species best; and the pots well drained with broken potsherds, that the water may pass freely off. Very young cuttings, planted in sand, under a bell-glass, will root without difficulty.

Monsonia is a pretty genus belonging to the Ge-raniaceae ; a mixture of light turfy loam and decayed leaves suits it well; and the species are readily increased by cuttings, or by pieces of the roots.

Montinia is a native of the Cape, and belongs to the Montinieae tribe of Onagrarieae : it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely, under a hand-glass.

MoRiEA is a pretty genus of bulbs belonging to the Irideae, chiefly natives of the Cape : a mixture of very sandy loam and decayed leaves or peat soil suits them best. After the bulbs have done flowering, they require no more water till they begin to grow afresh. In October they may be fresh potted, and divided, when the cooler they are kept the better, till the pots are filled with fresh roots ; then they have strength to send up strong flowering stems, which is not the case if they are forced before the pots are well filled with roots. When they begin to grow strong, they may be set in a warmer situation, and watered regularly : they will succeed well in a pit in the way recommended for Ixia, Gladiolus, Antho-lyza, and other Cape bulbs, and the hardiest species will succeed well planted in a south border in sandy soil, so as to be covered with a little dry straw or litter, in severe weather ; the bulbs in such a situation, must be planted 5 or 6 inches deep. They are increased by offsets from the bulbs, and by seeds.

Mor i n a persicabelongs to the Dipsaceae: it thrives well in any light rich soil; and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seed.

Morpiiixia is a Cape genus of Irideae, divided from Ixia by Mr. Ker; it is the Hyalis of Salisbury, which, being the earliest name, should perhaps be more properly adopted; its species require precisely the same sort of treatment as Ixia, and the other Cape Irideae.

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Mundia is a genus belonging to the Polygaleae, the original Polygala spinosa: it thrives well in sandy peat, and often produces fruit, consisting of scarlet, or orange-coloured berries, which, as well as the flowers, are very pretty; young cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in sand, will strike root

Muraltia is a pretty genus belonging to Polygaleae ; to it belongs Poly gala Heisteria, and the other species related to it; they all succeed well in sandy peat soil; and young cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in sand, will strike root freely.

Murraya exotica is generally treated as a greenhouse plant, but is well deserving a place in the stove, where it will produce abundance of fragrant and handsome flowers; it is also a fine growing shrub, with dark green shining leaves ; the best soil for it is a light turfy loam, and a little peat mixed with it. Cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Muss^nda isa genus belonging to the Rubiaceae. M. pubescens is a pretty climbing plant, which thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings strike root freely in sand, under a handglass.

Mussciiia belongs to the Campanulaceae ; and is the Campanula aurea of authors; though certainly a very distinct genus: it is a suffrutescent and rather succulent plant, of a milky substance; and is best raised from seeds, which ripen in abundance.

Mutisia is a handsome genus, belonging to the Labiataeflone tribe of Composite ; its species grow freely in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them very well; young cuttings, planted in the same sort of mould, under a hand-glass, will strike root readily.

Mylocaryum ligustrinum, or Buck-wheat Tree, is an American genus belonging to the Ericeae : it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat, and may be preserved through the winter in a frame, or against a wall, with the protection of a mat in severe frost. Ripened cuttings root freely under a hand-glass, in sand.

Mvoporum is a New Holland genus, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Myrica, or Candleberry Myrtle. The greenhouse kinds thrive well in loam and peat; and young cuttings root freely under a bell-glass ; they also frequently produce seeds.

Myrsine grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Myrsipiiyllum is a pretty climbing genus, belonging to Asphodeleae, which thrives well in sandy loam and peat, and is increased by dividing at the roots.

Myrtus, or Myrtle, is a genus much esteemed: the different varieties of M. communis being very fragrant, they will all grow freely in a rich loamy soil; or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them

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as well as any. M. tomentosa is rather too tender to thrive in the greenhouse, a cool part of the stove will suit it better, but it will not bear being plunged in heat. Cuttings, not too ripe, root freely under a hand-glass, or bell-glasses.

N.

Nandina domestica is a Chinese shrub belonging to Berberideas: it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, with their leaves not shortened, will soon root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Nebelia is a genus belonging to the Bruniaceae; its species succeed best in a light sandy peat soil; and the pots to be well drained, that the moisture may pass off regularly ; young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under a hand-glass, root readily.

Nemesia is a Cape genus belonging to the Scro-phularinae : any light rich soil will suit it; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Nephuodium is a genus of Ferns; the greenhouse species succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat, or any light sandy soil; and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Nerine is a genus of the Cape Amaryllideae ; that thrive well in a mixture of two-thirds sandy loam and one-third peat, and are readily increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds ; they will all succeed well, planted out in a frame or pit, in the same sort of soil; or in a warm sheltered border ; requiring nothing more than the covering of a mat in severe frost, and to be exposed to the air when the weather is mild; the bulbs should be planted from 4 to G inches deep, according to their size.

Nerium Oleander and its varieties thrive well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, on a little heat, will root freely. N. odorum is often treated as a greenhouse plant, but requires a stove to flower in perfection.

Nicotian a will thrive in any light rich soil; the greenhouse kinds are as readily increased by seeds as the annuals.

Niebuhria is a genus belonging to the Cappari-deae; the greenhouse species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, nearly ripened, will root readily in pots of sand, under a hand-glass.

Niphobolus is a genus of Ferns ; they thrive well in an equal portion of sandy loam and peat; and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

N i ve n i a is a handsome genus belonging to the Pro-teaceae. The species are all natives of the Cape. The best soil for them is an equal mixture of soft loam, peat, and sand; the pots must be well drained with potsherds broken small, that they may not be soddened with too much wet; and they require to be kept in an airy situation, that 2 a 4

their leaves may not be damaged by damp. Ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, and planted in a pot of sand, without shortening their leaves, will strike root under a hand-glass, in a cool shady situation : when rooted, they must be potted off in small pots, and placed in a close frame, and must be hardened to the air by degrees.

Nocca is a genus belonging to Composite ; its species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and will survive the winter in the open borders in a sheltered situation, to be covered with a mat or some other slight covering in severe frost; cuttings root readily, planted under handglasses, in the same sort of soil.

Notel^a is a New Holland genus belonging to the Oleinae : the species thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root freely, under a hand-glass, in sand.

NotholjEna is a genus of Ferns; the greenhouse species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

NymphjEa is a handsome genus of water plants ; the greenhouse species may be grown in a tub; or a large pot, well stopped, that the water may not leak out; this may be stood in any light airy part of the greenhouse, and must be filled about three parts full of light rich loam, and a little peat may be added to it; in this the plants must be planted, and the pot or tub must be filled with clear water, which must be changed occasionally; some of the sorts may be increased from the tubers at their roots; but the greater part produce seeds.

O.

Ocotea is a genus belonging to Laurinae; the greenhouse species grow best in a mixture of two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third peat; and ripened cuttings root freely in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass.

Ocymum is a genus belonging to the Labiatae : the greenhouse kinds thrive well in any rich light soil; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

(Edera is a genus belonging to the Compositae: any rich light soil will suit it well; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass.

CEnothera is a genus belonging to the Onagra-rise: the greenhouse kinds thrive well in a rich light soil; and are readily increased by seeds, or dividing at the roots. Cuttings also root freely under a hand-glass.

Ole a is a pretty genus, and most of the greenhouse kinds are admired for the fragrance of their flowers: the best soil for them is an equal mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass. They may also be increased by grafting on Ligustrum vul-gare (the common Privet).

Olinia is a Cape genus related to Rhamneae ; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam and

peat; and cuttings, not quite ripened, will root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Omalanthus belongs to the Euphorbiacese; it is a New Holland genus, related to Croton; and succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Ononis is a Papilionaceous genus. The greenhouse kinds thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat. They are readily increased by seeds ; or young cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in sand, will strike root.

Onoseris belongs to the Labiatiflorae tribe of Com-positse ; they will grow freely in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them very well; they will stand our winters in a sheltered situation, with the covering of a mat, or any other slight covering in severe frosty weather, but to be always exposed when the weather is mild; young cuttings, planted in a shady situation in spring or summer, or under a hand-glass, will strike root readily.

On osm a is a pretty genus belonging to the Bora-gineae: the species are generally considered as hardy plants, by which means they are often lost; they are well deserving the protection of a greenhouse or good frame to preserve them through the winter; or if that cannot be procured, a garden pot placed over them, with the hole stopped up in the bottom, will in general secure them. A rich

light soil suits them best; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Opercularia is a New Holland genus, which thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Ophiopogon isagenus belonging to the Smilaceae, which thrives well in any rich light soil, and is increased by dividing at the root. The different species will succeed well in the open air, with the protection of a close garden pot, or any other slight covering in severe frost.

Ophrys is a pretty genus belonging to the Orchi-deae, which thrives best in a chalky soil, if it can be procured; if not, a mixture of light loam and peat. After plants have done flowering, they require but little water; the only way of increasing them is from seeds; but the whole of the species will succeed best in the open air, with some turfs of grass planted round the roots, and the covering of a pot, or of mats in winter.

Orchis requires the same treatment as the last genus.

Origanum is a genus belonging to the Labiatae: a mixture of loam and peat suits the species as well as any thing; and cuttings strike root readily under a hand-glass.

Ornithogalum belongs to the Asphodeleae: the greenhouse species thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and require but little water when not in a growing state; they are increased by offsets from the bulbs: those that are now treat-

ed as greenhouse bulbs, will thrive better in the borders, to be planted about 4 to 6 inches deep, according to the size of the bulb, and to be covered a little in severe frosty weather; and those that their leaves die down in autumn,> might be taken out of the ground, and kept dry through the winter, and planted again in spring as soon as the weather permits.

Ornitiioglossum is another bulbous rooted genus from the Cape, belonging to Melanthaceae; and succeeds well with the same treatment as Ornithogalum.

Orthoceras is a New South Wales Orchideous genus, nearly related to Diurus, and requires precisely the same treatment as the other bulbous New Holland genera of Orchideae.

Orthrosanthus is a beautiful genus from New Holland, with blue flowers, belonging to the Iri-deae ; it grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and may be increased by offsets from the root, or by seeds.

Osmites is a genus belonging to the Compositae, which grows well in any rich light soil; or a mixture of loam and peat will suit it very well. Cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Osteospermum is a Cape genus belonging to the Compositae, and requires the same treatment as the last genus.

Osyris, or Poet’s Cassia, belongs to the Osyrideae: it thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in sand, will strike root.

Othonna is a genus belonging to the Composite: any rich light soil will suit the species, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Oti di a is a succulent genus of the Geraniaceae, natives of the Cape ; the different species succeed best in an equal portion of light loam, peat, and sand; and young cuttings, laid to dry two or three days before planting, will soon strike root, if planted in pots of the same sort of soil, and placed in a shady part of the greenhouse.

Otoptera is a Cape Papilionaceous genus, which grows freely in an equal portion of light loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under bell-glasses, will strike root readily.

Oxalis is a genus of bulbs, chiefly natives of the Cape, and North and South America: a mixture of sand, loam, and peat, is the best soil for the various species; and they require no water after they have done flowering, till they begin to grow afresh: the greater part of them succeed well in a warm border in the open air, requiring only protection by a mat or some other slight covering in severe frosty weather, and to be always exposed to the air when the weather is mild: we have had a plant of O .floribunda, (a native of Brazil) in flower in a border in our garden the whole year through, producing a hundred umbels of flowers at a time, and opening its flowers every day the sun shines on it, even in the middle of winter: it has been the admiration of every one that has seen

it. The caulescent species strike root readily from cuttings, but those must be put in early in spring; otherwise they will not produce bulbs sufficiently strong by autumn, to preserve them through the winter: the others are increased by offsets from the bulbs, and by seeds: many of them may have their bulbs taken up in autumn after flowering, to be planted again in spring.

Oxybaphus belongs to the Nyctagineae, and its species succeed well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat: they will succeed well in the open borders, to be planted out in spring like the common Marvel of Peru, and to be taken up again in autumn, and kept dry and out of the reach of frost till the following spring, when they must be again planted: they may be increased by seeds, which are frequently produced in abundance.

Oxylobium is a New Holland decandrous genus belonging to the Papilionaceae: an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for it; and young cuttings, planted in sand, under a handglass, will strike root. Some of the species produce plenty of seeds, by which they are readily increased.

Ozothamnus is an Australian genus belonging to Composite, chiefly consisting of soft-wooded shrubs; they all grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, will strike root in a few days.

P.

Pachidendron is a genus of tree Aloes; which thrive best in a mixture of old lime and brick rubbish, mixed with sandy loam: the pots in which they are grown must be well drained with pieces of potsherds, that the moisture may pass oft' readily, and they require but little water in winter; they may be increased by suckers, or young side shoots, where any are produced: or leaves, taken off1 close from the stem, and laid to dry for a few days, and then planted in pots of dry soil, will frequently throw out young plants at their base.

Pachypodium is a succulent and tuberous-rooted genus, belonging to Apocine®: it succeeds best in an equal mixture of light turfy loam, peat, and sand, and requires scarcely any water in winter: the pots must therefore be well drained, that the moisture may pass off freely : a fine figure of it is published in Jacquiris Fragmenta, t. 117; this is not noticed in the Botanical Register, where it appears to be taken for a new plant; cuttings, taken off, and laid to dry till the wound is dried up, and then planted in a pot of dry soil, in spring, will strike root, and produce tubers before winter.

P/eonia Moutan, or Tree Pacony, and its different varieties, are hardy enough to bear our winters in the open air; but they do not flower in such perfection as when planted out in a conservatory, or in a pit, where they may be protected from the severe frost under glass: they will thrive well in

any rich light soil; and ripened cuttings, slipped off, and planted in the ground, in a shady place, without cover, will root freely.

Pallasia is a genus belonging to the Composite: it thrives well in any rich light soil; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass.

Pan ax belongs to the Araliaceae ; the greenhouse species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily in the same sort of soil, under a hand-glass.

Pancratium consists chiefly of hardy bulbs; the greenhouse kinds thrive best in an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand, and require but little water when in a stagnant state : they are increased by offsets from the bulbs and by seeds.

Parochetus is a Nepaul Papilionaceous genus; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, under hand-glasses, will root freely.

Paronychia is a genus belonging to the Parony-chese: the greenhouse kinds thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, root freely.

Passerina is a genus belonging to the Thymelaeae, which thrives best in sandy peat; and young cuttings root freely, under a bell-glass, in sand.

Passiflora, or Passion Flower. There are now several hybrid plants belonging to this genus, that will succeed well in a greenhouse; they are very handsome, and free bloomers. These all

thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely under a hand-glass, in a little bottom heat: the younger the cuttings are, the better they will root.

Patagonula belongs to the Boragineae ; it grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat, or any other light rich soil; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil, will soon strike root.

Paterson ia is a pretty New Holland genus belonging to the Irideae, which thrives best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and is increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds; the different species of this genus may be cultivated with great success in frames, or even in a sheltered border,with the covering of a garden potover them in severe frost, and a little dry litter, or a mat, over the pot.

Pa voni Abelongs to Malvaceae; the greenhouse species grow freely in any rich light soil, and are readily increased by seeds, which ripen in abundance : they may also be propagated by cuttings, which wdl root in sand, under a hand-glass.

Pelargonium is a genus belonging to the Gera-niaceae: there are several distinct sections belonging to it, which require a difference in treatment. The most common free-growing sorts will thrive well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and decayed leaves will suit them very well: the dwarfer woody kinds, as P. clcgans, ovale, &c. thrive best in an equal mixture 2 B

of loam, peat, and sand, and require their pots to be well drained ; the succulent kinds succeed best in rather more than one third of fine sand, and the same quantity of turfy loam, the remainder of peat; the pots also require to be well drained with small potsherds, and require scarcely any water when not in vigorous growth; the tuberous-rooted kinds thrive best in the same sort of soil as the succulent ones, and require no water after they have done flowering, till they begin to grow afresh. Cuttings of the shrubby sorts strike root freely under hand-glasses in the same kind of soil, or in pots, without being covered by glass, and placed in a shady situation. Many of the sorts may also be increased by pieces of their roots, or from seeds. The tuberous-rooted kinds may be propagated by the little tubers of the roots, or by seeds. For the general treatment of each species, see Sxveet's Geraniacea.

Penaja is a beautiful Cape genus, which thrives best in a mixture of one third very sandy loam, and the rest sandy peat; the pots must be well drained with broken potsherds, as the plants are apt to be injured by too much wet. Young cuttings root without difficulty under bell-glasses, in sand.

Pentataxis is a genus related to Gnaphalium: it succeeds well in a mixture of two-thirds sandy peat, and one-third light loam; and cuttings will root readily in pots in the same sort of soil, either

under a hand-glass, in frames; or without glass in a shady situation.

Pentzia is a genus belonging to the Composite: it thrives well in any rich light soil; and cuttings planted under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Peraltf.a is a Leguminous genus, native of New Spain ; and belongs to the tribe of Geoffrea; it grows freely in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit it very well; and young cuttings, planted in glass, in the same sort of soil, will soon strike root.

Pereski a is a genus belonging to the Cacteae, many of which bear very handsome flowers ; but they are generally kept growing so freely in this country, that they have no opportunity to ripen their wood to produce flowers : the best way to treat them, is to turn them all out in the month of May or June, and let them take all the weather through the summer, which will harden their wood, and give them such a check, that it will be the means of throwing them into flower: after being set in the house the latter end of August or beginning of September, they should be kept dry for some time, till they have thrown off their leaves, soon after which they may be set growing slowly, and they will then produce flower-buds, after which they must be well supplied with water, that they may not drop off; the species from Mexico aiad other temperate parts succeed best in the greenhouse; and those from the West Indies, Brazil, 2 b 2

or other tropical parts, will require the heat of the stove in winter.

Pf.rsoonja is a genus belonging to the Proteaceae, which thrives best in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand; and ripened cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Petalacte is another genus related to Gnapha-lium ; its species succeed well in a mixture of two-thirds sandy peat, and one-third light turfy loam; and cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed under a hand-glass, or in a shady situation, without glass, will root readily; but care must be taken not to water them over the leaves, or they will be liable to damp off.

Petamenes is a bulbous genus, belonging to Iri-deas; and requires the same treatment as Gladiolus and Ixia.

Petrophila is a genus belonging to the Proteaceae, and succeeds best in an equal mixture of light loam, peat and sand ; and ripened cuttings, planted in pots of sand, and placed under a handglass, will strike root readily.

PEYROusiAisa pretty bulbous genus from the Cape, belonging to Irideae; and requires precisely the same sort of treatment as Gladiolus and Ixia.

Ph alangium is a genus belonging to Asphodeleae; the greenhouse species succeed best in an equal mixture of light sandy loam and peat; and they will succeed well, planted out in a frame or pit; or in a warm border in a sheltered situation, to be

covered with a mat, or any other slight covering in severe frosty weather; they may be increased by dividing at the root, or by seeds.

Pharnaceum thrives best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in the same kind of soil, will strike root.

Phebalium is a New Holland genus belonging to the Diosmeae tribe of Rutaceae ; its species succeed best in two-thirds sandy peat, and one-third sandy loam; and young cuttings, planted in sand, under bell-glasses, will root readily.

Pjiilotiieca is another New Holland genus, belonging to the same order as the last; and requires precisely the same treatment.

Phlomis is a genus belonging to the Labiatae: the greenhouse species thrive well in any rich light soil; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Phcen ix is a genus of Palms; the greenhouse species succeed well in a sandy loam ; and may be increased by seeds, or occasionally by suckers from the root.

Phienocoma is a handsome genus of Compositae from the Cape, composed of Helichrysum proli-ferum; it succeeds best in a light sandy peat soil, with a small portion of very sandy loam mixed with it; and may be raised from seeds; or cuttings, planted in pots, and placed in a hot-bed frame, will root freely.

Phormium, or Flax Lily, will thrive in any rich light soil, and may be increased by offsets from the root.

2 b 3

Photinia is a genus divided from Crataegus, and to it belongs C. glabra, and arbutifolia. They require very little protection, being almost, or quite hardy, and will succeed well, nailed against a wall in a warm situation. They thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will root freely; they will also succeed well from grafting, or inarching on the different species of Pyrus or Mespilus.

Phycella is a pretty bulbous genus belonging to Amaryllideae ; the species succeed well in a mixture of rather more than one-third loam, one-third sand, and the rest peat: being natives of Chile, they are not very tender, and succeed well, planted in a pit or frame, or in a warm border, with the protection of a mat, or some other slight covering in severe frost: they may be increased by offsets from the bulbs, or by seeds.

Phy lica isa Cape genus, which grows best in sandy peat; and young cuttings will root readily under a bell-glass, in sand.

Phyllis Nobla belongs to the Rubiaceae: a mixture of loam and peat suits it best; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in sand, will root readily.

Phyllocladus is a New Zealand genus, belonging to the Taxinea: tribe of Coniferae ; it grows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and cuttings, nearly ripened, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Phyllolobium is a Papilionaceous genus, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings will root under a bell-glass, in sand.

Phymatanthus belongs to the Geraniacea;, and consists of a natural tribe of plants, with warted petals: they are rather more difficult of cultivation than the more common tribe of Pelargonium, and succeed best in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand; young cuttings, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, and placed on a shelf in the greenhouse, will soon strike root.

Physalis is a genus belonging to the Solaneae: the greenhouse kinds thrive well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings root freely under a handglass. They may also be raised from seeds, which some species produce in abundance.

Phytolacca belongs to the Phytolacese: the greenhouse species succeed well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them very well: they may be increased by seeds, which ripen in abundance; or young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil in pots, or under handglasses, will root readily.

Pileanthus is a New Holland genus, belonging to the Chamaelaucieae tribe of Myrtaceae: it grows freely in an equal mixture of turfy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in a pot of sand,with a bell-glass placed over them, will strike root freely.

Pimelea is a pretty New Holland genus belonging to the Thymelaeas: its species thrive best in sandy peat soil; and young cuttings are not dif-2 u 4

ficult to root in sand under a bell-glass; they also produce seeds, by which they are readily increased; several pretty species are now in the collections about London.

Pinckneya is a genus belonging to the Rubiaceae: it thrives best turned out against a south wall, and protected by a mat in frosty weather, or to be planted in a conservatory; a mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for it; and cuttings, planted in sand under a hand-glass,willstrike root.

Pinus, or the Fir tribe, are mostly hardy trees: the few greenhouse kinds, as P. longifolia, and catia-riensis, thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings of them root freely in sand under a hand-glass; the glasses must be often taken oft' to give them air, as they are very liable to damp.

Piqueria is a genus belonging to the Compositse, which will grow freely in any rich light soil; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass,or in pots, in the same sort of soil.

Pisonia belongs to the Nyctaginese: the greenhouse species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a

* hand-glass.

Pistacia is a genus belonging to theTerebintacese: a mixture of loam and peat is the best soil for the species; and ripened cuttings may be rooted under a hand-glass, in sand.

Pittosporum thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass. They may also be increased by grafting one species on the other.

Plagianthus belongs to the Bombaceae: it grows freely in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit it very well; and young cuttings will root freely in sand, under a hand-glass, on a slight heat.

Plagiolobium is a handsome genus belonging to Papilionaceae, with bright blue flowers: they are natives of New Holland, and grow freely in an equal mixture of very sandy loam and peat: young cuttings may be rooted under a bell-glass, in sand, and seeds are occasionally ripened.

Plantago thrives well in any rich light soil. Most of the species are hardy. The few greenhouse kinds are easily managed; and cuttings root freely, planted in the ground, under a hand-glass.

Platylobium is a Papilionaceous genus from New Holland, and some of the species are very handsome : a mixture of sandy loam and peat is the best soil for them, and cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a hand-glass. They may also be raised from seeds, which are sometimes produced in abundance.

Plectranthus belongs to the Labiatae: any rich lightsoil will suit it; and cuttings strike root freely .

Plectronia is a Cape genus, belonging to Rubi-aceae, which thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings will root under a hand-glass, in sand.

Pleurandra is a pretty genus belonging to the Dilleniaceae; its species succeed well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Plocama is a genus belonging to the Rubiacea;: a mixture of loam and peat suits it best; and ripened cuttings, planted in sand, under a handglass, will root readily.

Plumbago capensis is a handsome, free-flowering greenhouse plant; there are also some other greenhouse species ; they will thrive well in any rich light soil; and cuttings root very soon in a little heat, either in mould or sand.

Podalyria is a pretty Papilionaceous genus from the Cape; the species are well suited for a conservatory : a mixture of loam and peat suits them best; and young cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a bell-glass. They may also be raised from seeds, which sometimes ripen plentifully.

Podanthus belongs to Composite; its species grow freely in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them very well; young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil, will root readily ; seeds are also frequently produced ; if planted in a warm border, they will only need protection by a mat, or any other slight covering, in severe frost.

Podocarpus is a genus belonging to the Conifers; : a mixture of loam and peat suits them very well; and ripened cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, in sand: the Chinese species appear to bear our winters well, in the open borders, if planted in a sheltered situation.

Podolepis is a New Holland genus belonging to the Composite, which thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and is increased by dividing near the root, or by seeds.

PoDOLO BiUMisa handsome Papilionaceous genus, which thrives best in an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand: young cuttings may be rooted in sand, under a bell-glass; seeds also ripen plentifully, if well managed.

Podopterus belongs to the Polygoneae : it succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil, or in any rich light mould, will root readily.

Pogonia is a North American Orchideous genus, which thrives best in sandy peat; and is increased by offsets from the root; succeeding well in a warm border in the open air, in the same sort of soil.

Polycarp-ea belongs to the Paronychieae: the greenhouse species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and youngcuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will soon strike root: they will succeed well in a warm border, with a little protection in winter.

Poly gala is a pretty genus, and the greenhouse species are chiefly natives of the Cape; from them have lately been divided the tribe to which P. Heisteria belongs, under the generic name of Muraltia, of which see an account of their culture in its proper place; the species now belonging to Polygala will thrive well in two thirds peat and one third turfy loam, with a good quantity of sand mixed with it; and have the cuttings proper for putting in, the shoots should be topped; they will then shoot out numerous young ones, which should be taken off close, when about three inches long, and in a young growing state ; those must be planted in pots 0/ sand, under bell-glasses, and placed in the propagation house, or in a close frame; and the glasses must be taken off and wiped occasionally.

Poly podium is a genus of Ferns : the greenhouse species succeed well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and are increased by dividing at the root, or by seed.

Polyspora is the genus to which the Camellia axillaris of authors belong: it is a fine plant, and produces an abundance of large white flowers ; but a common greenhouse is scarcely warm enough for it in winter; an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat is a very proper soil for it; and cuttings nearly ripened, planted under a hand-glass, in sand, will root readily; it also frequently produces seeds: the seeds are very numerous and winged, and are enclosed in a dry capsule, so that it is much nearer related to Gor-donia than Camellia.

Pomaderris is a New Holland genus, which thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass ; seeds often ripen, which must be sown in spring.

Ponceleti a belongs to the Epacrideae : it succeeds best in a very sandy peat soil; and young cuttings, planted in sand under a bell-glass early in spring, or in August or September, will root without difficulty.

Poranthera is a New Holland genus, which grows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in a pot of sand, will root readily.

Porliera belongs to the Zygophylleae : it grows freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings nearly ripened, will soon strike root, under a hand-glass, in sand.

Portulacaria is a succulent genus belonging to the Portulaceee : it thrives well in sandy loam and brick rubbish ; and young cuttings taken off and laid to dry a few days, to heal up the wound, will root freely when potted.

Poterium is a genus belonging to the Rosaceae; the greenhouse kinds thrive in any rich light soil; and young cuttings will root readily, planted under a hand-glass, in the same kind of soil.

Prasium is a genus belonging to the Labiatae : it thrives well in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Prasopiiyllum is an extensive genus of Orchi-deae: all natives of Australia, with bulbous roots; they would all succeed best, planted out in a frame or pit, in an equal mixture of light loam, peat, and sand ; or if grown in pots in the greenhouse, the same sort of soil will suit them : they will also do well in a warm border in the open air, in a sheltered situation, with the covering of a mat in frosty weather.

Priestleya is a handsome Cape genus belonging to Papilionaceae: its species were originally confused with Borbonia and Liparia : there are several very pretty species, some of them thickly clothed with woolly hairs; those are rather difficult to keep through the winter, as the moisture sticks about the wool, and they frequently damp off; an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat suits them best; and young cuttings, planted in sand, under bell-glasses, will root freely.

Prisjiatocarpus is a Cape genus, belonging to Campanulaceae ; the suffrutescent and perennial species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily in the same sort of soil, either under a hand-glass, or without a glass in a shady situation ; the annual ones may be treated as half hardy annuals; to be sown in the greenhouse or warm annual bed early in spring, and then to be transplanted from thence into the borders, as soon as the weather permits.

Prostanthera is a beautiful New Holland genus belonging to the Labiatae ; it thrives well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, planted in the same kind of soil, under a handglass, will root readily.

Protea is a magnificent Cape genus, generally sup-

posed to be difficult to cultivate; the best soil for them is a light turfy loam, mixed with rather more than one third of fine sand; the pots must be well drained with broken potsherds, to prevent them from getting soddened with too much water; the roots are also very fond of running amongst the small bits of sherds. Care must be taken not to let them droop for want of water, as the young roots are of a very fleshy substance, and soon suffer by too much drought, as well as by too much moisture, so that they seldom recover, if suffered to flag much; they also like to be placed where they may have a free circulation of air, as they cannot bear to be crowded like the more rigidly growing plants. Ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, and pared quite smooth, will strike root, if planted thinly in pots of sand, and placed under a hand-glass, but not plunged : the glasses must be often taken off to give them air, as they are very liable to get the damp amongst them, which soon spreads, if not cleaned off, and destroys the whole; water them regularly whenever they want it, but not over the leaves, and let them get a little dry before the glasses are placed over them again. Some of the species root very soon, others are a long time before they root. The quickest rooting sorts we have met with are, P. cordata, cynaroides, amplexicautis, grandiflora, ace-rosa, nana, and acaulis. P. melUfera also roots very quickly sometimes. The same treatment will agree with several other genera belonging to

this family, as Leucospermum, Spatalla, Soro-cephalus, Leucadendron, and Aulax. See our observations in Botanical Magazine, No. 1717.

Psoralea is a Papilionaceous genus : the greenhouse kinds grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings will root in sand, under a bell-glass. They may also be raised from seeds, which ripen in abundance.

Pteris is a genus of Ferns : the greenhouse species thrive well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and are increased by dividing them at the roots, or by seeds.

Pteronia is a Cape genus belonging to the Composite : they thrive best in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely, under a hand-glass.

Pterostylis is a New Holland Orchideous genus, and requires precisely the same sort of treatment as Prasophyllum.

Pterygodium is an Orchideous genus from the Cape, and requires the same kind of treatment as the last genus.

Pulten.ea is a decandrous Papilionaceous genus, natives of New Holland : the best soil for them is an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; they succeed best, and show to most advantage, when grown in a conservatory; cuttings root readily under a bell-glass, in sand.

Punica, or Pomegranate, is a genus belonging to the Myrtacee. P. nana is generally treated as a greenhouse plant; but it will not flower in perfection, unless it be brought forward in the stove.

It thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings strike root freely, under a hand-glass.

Purgosea belongs to the Crassulaceae; its species succeed best in a mixture of very sandy loam, mixed with old lime or brick rubbish ; they require but little water in winter, and the pots in which they are grown should be well drained, that the moisture may pass off readily; cuttings taken off, and laid to dry a few days before planting, will soon strike root.

Pyrethrum is a genus belonging to the Composite : the greenhouse kinds grow freely in any rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will strike root readily : several of the species flower through the winter, which makes them desirable, for enlivening the greenhouse at that season.

R.

Rafnia is a Papilionaceous genus from the Cape, which thrives best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and is readily increased by seeds ; or young cuttings will root under a bell-glass,in sand.

RAPHioLEPisisa genus to which Cratagus indica, and other nearly related species, belong, chiefly natives of China; they all grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in sand, root readily;

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they will endure the winter in the open air with a slight protection in severe frost.

Raspalta belongs to the Bruniaceae ; and succeeds best in a light sandy peat; young cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in a pot of sand, are not difficult to root.

Reaumuria hypericoides is a handsome flowering plant: it thrives well in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will strike root.

Reevesia belongs to the Buttneriacese; it is a China plant, and grows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, or any other rich light soil; and cuttings not quite ripened will root freely in the same sort of soil, or in sand, under a hand-glass.

Relhania is a Cape genus belonging to the Com-positae : any rich light soil will suit it, or a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Requi en i a belongs to the Papilionaceae; the greenhouse species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in sand, under a bell-glass, will strike root.

Reseda grows freely in any rich light soil; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will root readily ; they also produce plenty of seeds.

Restio thrives best in peat soil, or a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and they are increased by dividing at the root.

Retan ill a belongs to theRhamneae ; it succeeds well in an equal mixture of sandy loam and

peat; and young cuttings, planted under a bell-glass, in sand, will soon strike root.

Retzia is a Cape genus which will thrive in any rich light soil; or a mixture of loam and peat will suit it very well; and cuttings will strike root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Rhagodia is a New Holland genus belonging to the Chenopodeas: an equal mixture of loam and peat suits it best; and cuttings strike root freely, under a hand-glass.

Rhamnus thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings strike root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Rhi pi dodendron is a genus divided by Wiildenow from Aloe: its species succeed well in a rich loam, mixed with some old lime or brick rubbish ; and they require but little water, particularly in winter, as they are of a succulent habit; cuttings root freely, planted in pots in the same sort of soil, placed on a shelf in the greenhouse.

Rhododendron arboreum is one of the finest plants that can be planted in the conservatory, where it will thrive and flower well, if planted out in good sandy peat soil; in mild winters it succeeds well in the open air, but it will not survive a severe winter, except well covered; it is best raised from seeds or layers, but young cuttings are not difficult to root, if taken off at a joint, and planted in sand under a bell-glass, and the pots plunged in a little bottom heat: they will also succeed very well inarched on the R. ponticum, or any other 2 c 2

strong growing common sort: they are then also more likely to produce an abundance of flowers, as it causes a check in their growth : there are several other Nepaul species which will require the same treatment.

Rhus is a genus consisting chiefly of hardy plants; the greenhouse species thrive well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings root freely, under a hand-glass, in sand.

Rhynchosia is a climbing genus of plants, belonging to Papilionaceae; the greenhouse species succeed well in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings will soon strike root, planted in pots of sand, under a bell-glass.

Richardia is a genus separated from Calla, and contains the Calla eethiopica of authors : from its frequent flowering, and the sweet scent of its flowers, it is well worth cultivation in the greenhouse or conservatory ; any rich light soil suits it well, and it may be readily increased by dividing the offsets from the root.

Ricinus belongs to the Euphorbiaceae: it will thrive well in any light rich soil, and maybe increased by seeds; or cuttings, taken off at a joint, and planted under a hand-glass, will strike root readily.

Ripogonum is a climbing genus from New Holland, belonging to Smilaceae, with white flowers; it succeeds well in an equal portion of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will soon strike root; it may also be increased by dividing at the root.

Roche a is a handsome genus of succulent plants, belonging to Crassulaceae ; several of the species bear large corymbs of red or scarlet flowers, which make a fine appearance ; they also continue in flower for a considerable time, and their fine glaucous leaves give them a look of grandeur: they succeed well in sandy loam or fine gravel; and cuttings strike root freely, but should lay to dry a day or two before planting, otherwise they are liable to rot.

Roella is a very pretty Cape genus belonging to the Campanulaceae. A mixture of sandy loam and peat suits them best; and they are readily increased by seeds; or young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Roeperia is a New Holland genus belonging to Zygophylleae; it grows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Rosa. The Chinese species of this genus are hardy enough to survive through the winter out of doors; but they are deserving a place in a warm greenhouse, where they will continue to flower nearly all the winter: they will thrive in any rich light soil; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass.

Rosmarinus is a genus belonging to the Labiatae. R. chilensis thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Royena is a Cape genus belonging to the Ebena-cea*, which thrives well in a mixture of loam and 2 c 3

peat; and ripened cuttings strike root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Rubus is a genus belonging to the Rosaceae. The greenhouse kinds will thrive well in any rich light soil; or a mixture of loam and peat will suit them very well. Cuttings strike root freely under a hand-glass, in the same kind of soil.

Ruellia belongs to the order of Acanthaceae. The greenhouse kinds thrive well in any rich light soil; and cuttings root freely, planted under hand-glasses.

Rulingia is a genus belonging to the Buttneri-aceae: its species grow freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat: and young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in the same sort of mould, will soon strike root; they may also be raised from seeds, which often ripen.

Ruse us thrives well in any rich light soil; and is increased by dividing at the root.

Ruta will grow freely in any rich light soil; and cuttings, planted under hand-glasses, will soon strike root.

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Sageretia belongs to the Rhamneae ; its species grow freely in two-thirds sandy loam, and one-third peat; and cuttings a little hardened will strike root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Sagittaria is a genus of Water plants, which require to be grown in a cistern, or in large pots

or tubs of water, which must be kept filled up as fast as the water decreases. They may be placed in the greenhouse or conservatory, or in frames. Any common garden soil will suit them; and they are readily increased by dividing at the root.

Salicornia is a genus belonging to the Cheno-podeae. S. arabica, the only greenhouse species, grows freely in rich light soil: but care must be taken not to overwater it, being of a succulent nature, and apt to rot if it gets too much wet. Cuttings strike root readily, planted in a pot of earth, or under a hand-glass.

Salpiglossis is a beautiful genus belonging to Scrophularineae : there are lately three new species introduced, which have the appearance of being biennial; if so, they will require the protection of the greenhouse in winter; or at any rate the seeds will require to be raised in a greenhouse or frame early in spring. The S. retusa we saw growing very tine in a border in the open air, in Mr. Barclay's garden at Bury Hill, in October last.

Salvia, or Sage, is a genus belonging to the Labiate®. The greenhouse kinds thrive well in any rich light soil, or a mixture of loam and peat suits them very well. Cuttings soon strike root, under a hand-glass.

Samolus littoralis is a native of New Holland. A mixture of loam and peat suits it very well; and cuttings strike freely under a hand-glass.

Santalum is a genus belonging to Santalace®;

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the greenhouse species grow freely in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Saiicocaulon is the succulent tribe of the genus Monsoma, which is certainly a very distinct genus, belonging to Geraniaceae; the best soil for the species is an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand; and young cuttings, planted in the same sort of soil, are not difficult to root.

Sarcococca is a Nepaul genus, belonging to Eu-phorbiaceae ; it grows freely in an equal portion of loam and peat; and cuttings nearly ripened will root readily in sand, under a hand-glass, on a little heat.

Sarcophyli.um is a Papilionaceous genus from the Cape A mixture of loam and peat suits it very well; but being of a succulent nature, care must be taken not to overwater it. Young cuttings strike root readily in sand, under a bell-glass.

Satureja is a genus belonging to the Labiatae. The greenhouse kinds thrive well in any rich light soil; and cuttings will soon strike root, under a hand-glass.

Satyrium is a curious Orchideous genus from the Cape; the best soil for them is a mixture of sandy loam and peat; watering them but sparingly; like the other Cape Orchideae, they will succeed best in a frame or pit, or in a warm border, with a little protection in severe frost.

Scabjosa is a genus belonging to the Dipsaceae. The greenhouse species will thrive in any rich

light soil; and cuttings, planted under a handglass, will root freely; they may also be raised from seeds, which are sometimes produced.

Sc^evola is a genus belonging to the Goodenovia;. The greenhouse kinds grow freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will root readily.

Schelhammera is a pretty genus, belonging to Melanthaceae: its species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat, and may be increased by dividing at the root; they will succeed better planted out in a pit or frame, than in the greenhouse, with a little protection from the frost in winter.

Schinus belongs to the Terebintaceae. The greenhouse kinds grow well in a mixture of loam and peat; and ripened cuttings, with their leaves not shortened, will root freely in sand, under a handglass.

Schizandra isa genus related to the Menisper-maceae. A mixture of sandy peat and loam suits it very well; and it is a desirable plant, being a greenhouse climber, and bearing pretty scarlet flowers. Ripened cuttings will strike root, planted in sand, under a hand-glass.

Schcepfia belongs to the Symplocinea;: it succeeds well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, nearly ripened, strike root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

ScHo riA is a beautiful Papilionaceous genus from the Cape; several species have been introduced to the collections, by Mr. Burchell. A mixture of loam and peat suits them very well; but some of the kinds are rather too tender for the greenhouse. A cool part of the stove suits them better in winter. Ripened cuttings root freely in sand, under a hand-glass.

Schrankia is a genus belonging to the Mimosae, which thrives best in a mixture of loam and peat; and young cuttings may be rooted under a bell-glass, in sand.

SClerothamnus is a decandrous Papilionaceous plant from New Holland. An equal mixture of sandy loam and peat suits it best; and young cuttings will strike root in sand, under a bell-glass.

Scotti a is a Papilionaceous genus from New Holland : its species thrive best in an equal mixture of sandy loam and peat; and young cuttings, taken otf at a joint, and planted in sand, under a bell-glass, will strike root.

Scutellaria is a genus belonging to the Labiatae. The greenhouse kinds grow freely in any rich light soil; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass.

Sec am one is a genus belonging to the Asclepia-dese, which thrives well in any rich light soil; or a mixture of loam and peat will suit it as well as any. Cuttings, planted in sand, under a handglass, will root freely.

Selago is a pretty Cape genus belonging to the Selaginea;: a mixture of loam and peat suits them best; and cuttings root freely in the same kind of soil, under a hand-glass.

Selloa is a genus belonging to the Composite : it will thrive well in any rich light soil; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass. It may also be raised from seeds, which are produced in abundance.

Sempervivum is a succulent genus: the greenhouse kinds are chiefly natives of the Canary Islands. A mixture of sandy loam and brick rubbish is the best soil for them, and they require but little water when not in flower. Cuttings, taken off, and laid to dry a few days, will strike root freely; when potted, they must be watered very sparingly, or they will rot: they need no covering of glass, but will root better without it: if stuck in the bark-bed in the hot-house, they will root quicker than by any other means.

Senacia belongs to the Pittosporeas: the greenhouse species succeed well in an equal mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings, nearly ripened, will root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Senecio is a genus belonging to the Composite. Any rich light soil will suit them very well; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, will soon strike root, or they will root without the protection of glass, if planted in pots, and placed in a sheltered situation.

Septa s is a genus of rather a succulent nature, belonging to the Crassulaceae, with fleshy tuberous roots. A mixture of sandy loam and peat suits them very well, watering them but sparingly, when not in a growing state: they are readily increased by dividing at the roots.

Sera pi as is an Orchideous genus, which thrives best in a mixture of sandy loam and peat, and is increased by dividing the roots, or by seed : they will succeed well in a warm border, with a little covering in winter.

Seringia is a genus divided from Lasiopetalum : it grows freely in a mixture of sandy loam and peat; and may be increased by young cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, in the same sort of soil, or by seeds, which ripen occasionally.

SERissAisa genus belonging to theRubiaceae, which grows freely in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings root readily, under a hand-glass, in sand.

Serpicula is a creeping plant from the Cape. A mixture of sandy loam and peat suits it very well; and cuttings strike root freely under a hand-glass.

Serruria is a pretty Cape genus belonging to the Proteaceae: they are chiefly free flowerers, and make snug bushy plants. The best soil for them is rather more than one-third light loam, scarcely a third of peat, and a third of sand : their pots must be well drained with broken potsherds, or they are apt to get soddened with too much water: they also require an airy situation, as they are so crowded with leaves that the branches are liable to damp and canker, if any wet settles amongst them. Ripened cuttings, taken off at a joint, and planted thinly in a pot of sand, will root without difficulty, under a hand-glass ; but the glass must be taken off occasionally, to give them air, and dry their leaves.

Sersalisia is a genus belonging to the Sapoteae. A mixture of sandy loam and peat suits it very well; and cuttings root readily in sand, under a hand-glass.

Seymouria is a little tuberous-rooted genus, belonging to the Geraniaceae, with dipetalous flowers : the best soil for them is an equal mixture of loam, peat, and sand; and they require no water after they have done flowering, and have ripened their seeds; but a constant supply when growing freely: bits of the root, planted in pots, with their tips above the surface of the mould, and kept dry a few days, till the cut is dried over, will soon make nice young plants; and the sooner they are potted off separately the better, when they have made leaves, as they are liable to be checked in moving, if left in the pots too long: the seeds should be sown early in spring; and as soon as the young plants begin to make rough leaves, they should be planted off separately in small thumb pots, and be shifted into larger ones as they attain strength.

Sid a is a genus belonging to the Malvaceae. The few greenhouse kinds thrive well in any rich light soil; and cuttings strike root freely, under a hand-glass, in sand : they may also be raised from seeds, which are generally produced in abundance.

Sideritis belongs to the Labiatae. The greenhouse kinds grow freely in any rich light soil; and cuttings root readily under a hand-glass.

Sideroxylon is a genus belonging to the Sapo-teae: it thrives well in a mixture of loam and peat; and cuttings a little ripened, may be struck in sand, under a hand-glass.

Silene is a genus belonging to the Caryophylleae : the few greenhouse kinds thrive well in rich light soil; and young cuttings, planted under a handglass, strike root readily.

Simsia is a curious New Holland genus belonging to Proteaceas: it succeeds best in an equal mixture of turfy loam, peat, and sand; and ripened cuttings, just as they begin to grow, if taken off at a joint, and planted in pots of sand, placed under a hand-glass, will soon strike root.

Sisymbrium is a genus belonging to the Cruciferae. S. millefolium grows freely in a rich light soil; and young cuttings root readily under a hand-glass, or planted in a pot and placed in a sheltered situation.

Sm i l a x belongs to the order Smilacete. The greenhouse kinds grow freely in a mixture of loam anti peat; and are increased by dividing at the root; or ripened cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will strike root readily.

Solanum thrives well in a rich light soil, and is readily increased by seeds ; or cuttings, planted in sand, under a hand-glass, will root freely.

Sonchus is a genus belonging to the Composite. The greenhouse kinds thrive well in a rich light soil; and cuttings, planted under a hand-glass, strike root readily.

Sophora is a pretty Papilionaceous genus; the

greenhouse species grow freely in an equal mixture of light turfy loam and peat; and cuttings, nearly ripened, will strike root readily, in sand, under a hand-glass.

Sorocephalus is a genus belonging to the Pro-teacern; and requires the same treatment as Protea, Leucadendron, &c.

Soulangia is a genus belonging to Rhamneae; and has been separated from Phylica by Brong-niart: its species succeed well in a mixture of two-thirds sandy peat, and one-third sandy loam; and young cuttings, planted in pots of sand, under hand-glasses, will root without difficulty.

Sowerbaea is a New Holland genus belonging to the Asphodeleae : it thrives best in a sandy peat soil, and likes plenty of water when healthy ; it is in