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Association of key foods and beverages with obesity in Australian schoolchildren

Sanigorski, Andrea M., Bell, A. Colin and Swinburn, Boyd A. 2007, Association of key foods and beverages with obesity in Australian schoolchildren, Public health nutrition, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 152-157, doi: 10.1017/S1368980007246634.

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Title Association of key foods and beverages with obesity in Australian schoolchildren
Author(s) Sanigorski, Andrea M.
Bell, A. ColinORCID iD for Bell, A. Colin orcid.org/0000-0003-2731-9858
Swinburn, Boyd A.
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 10
Issue number 2
Start page 152
End page 157
Total pages 6
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2007-02
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) obesity
children
sweetened drinks
nutrition
Summary Objective: To examine the pattern of intake of key foods and beverages of children aged 4–12 years and the association with weight status.
Design and setting: A computer-assisted telephone interview was used to determine the intake of fruit, vegetables, packaged snacks, fast foods and sweetened drinks ‘yesterday’ and ‘usually’ as reported by parents/guardians of a representative sample of 2184 children from the Barwon South-Western region of Victoria, Australia.
Results: Children who consumed .2–3, .3–4 and .4 servings of fruit juice/drinks ‘yesterday’ were, respectively, 1.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2–2.2), 1.7 (95% CI 1.2–2.5) and 2.1 (95% CI 1.5–2.9) times more likely to be overweight/obese compared with those who had no servings of fruit juice/drink ‘yesterday’, adjusted for age, gender and socio-economic status (SES). Further, children who had $3 servings
of soft drink ‘yesterday’ were 2.2 (95% CI 1.3–3.9) times more likely to be
overweight/obese compared with those who had no servings of soft drink ‘yesterday’, adjusted for age, gender and SES. In addition, children who ‘usually’ drank fruit juice/drinks twice or more per day were 1.7 (95% CI 1.2–2.4) times more likely to be overweight/obese compared with those who drank these beverages once or less per week, adjusted for age, gender and SES. Although fast foods and packaged snacks were regularly eaten, there were no associations between weight status and
consumption of these foods.
Conclusions: Intake of sweetened beverages was associated with overweight and obesity in this population of Australian schoolchildren and should be a target for intervention programmes aimed at preventing unhealthy weight gain in children.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S1368980007246634
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Cambridge University Press
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30007696

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