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Assessing cultural and linquistic appropriateness of the Rose Angina questionnaire in three ethnic groups

Hanna, L. and Bhopal, R. 2004, Assessing cultural and linquistic appropriateness of the Rose Angina questionnaire in three ethnic groups, in Migrant health in Europe : International conference on differences in health and health care provision, Dutch Expertise Network on Culture and Health, [Rotterdam, The Netherlands], pp. S12-S13, doi: 10.1080/1355785042000228387.

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Title Assessing cultural and linquistic appropriateness of the Rose Angina questionnaire in three ethnic groups
Author(s) Hanna, L.ORCID iD for Hanna, L. orcid.org/0000-0003-3173-3381
Bhopal, R.
Conference name European Migrant Health Conference (1st : 2004 : Rotterdam, The Netherlands)
Conference location Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Conference dates 23-25 Jun. 2004
Title of proceedings Migrant health in Europe : International conference on differences in health and health care provision
Publication date 2004
Start page S12
End page S13
Publisher Dutch Expertise Network on Culture and Health
Place of publication [Rotterdam, The Netherlands]
Summary Introduction. Meeting the needs of migrant groups in Europe requires cross-culturally valid questionnaires, a substantial challenge to researchers. The Rose Angina Questionnaire (RAQ) is an important measure of coronary heart disease prevalence. It consists of seven items that collectively yield a diagnosis of angina. It has been shown to perform inconsistently across some ethnic groups in Britain. This study aimed to assess the need for modifying the RAQ for cross-culturally valid use in the three main ethnic groups in Scotland.

Methods. Interviews were carried out with Pakistani Punjabi speakers (n=26), Chinese Cantonese speakers (n=29) and European-origin English speakers (n=25). Bilingual project workers interviewed participants and provided translation and commentary to the English-speaking researcher. Participants were asked about general and cardiovascular health beliefs and behaviours, and about attitudes to pain and chest pain. They were also asked to comment on their understanding of an existing version of the RAQ in their language.

Results. No dominant themes in the cultural construction of health, pain or cardiovascular knowledge emerged that may significantly influence RAQ response between language groups. Problems were encountered with the Punjabi and Cantonese translations of the RAQ. For example, the translation for “chest” was interpreted by some Pakistani and fewer Chinese women to mean “breasts”. “Walking uphill” was translated in Chinese as “walking the hill”, without stipulation of the direction, so that some Cantonese speakers interpreted the question as meaning walking downhill. In addition, many Chinese interpreted RAQ items to be referring to breathlessness rather than chest pain due to ambiguous wording.

Conclusion. Existing Punjabi and Cantonese versions of the RAQ should be modified before being used in multi-ethnic surveys. Current versions are unlikely to be yielding data that is comparable across groups. Other language versions also require similar investigation to study the cardiovascular health of Europe’s migrant groups.
Notes The abstract for this paper was published in : Ethnicity and Health, Vol.9 (Supplement 1) 2004: S12-S13.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/1355785042000228387
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 920503 Health Related to Specific Ethnic Groups
HERDC Research category E2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2004, Taylor & Francis.
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30023685

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