‘I can’t do any serious exercise’ : barriers to physical activity amongst people of Pakistani and Indian origin with Type 2 diabetes

Lawton, J., Ahmad, N., Hanna, L., Douglas, M. and Hallowell, N. 2006, ‘I can’t do any serious exercise’ : barriers to physical activity amongst people of Pakistani and Indian origin with Type 2 diabetes, Health education research, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 43-54, doi: 10.1093/her/cyh042.

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Title ‘I can’t do any serious exercise’ : barriers to physical activity amongst people of Pakistani and Indian origin with Type 2 diabetes
Author(s) Lawton, J.
Ahmad, N.
Hanna, L.ORCID iD for Hanna, L. orcid.org/0000-0003-3173-3381
Douglas, M.
Hallowell, N.
Journal name Health education research
Volume number 21
Issue number 1
Start page 43
End page 54
Total pages 12
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Cary, N.C.
Publication date 2006
ISSN 0268-1153
1465-3648
Summary Type 2 diabetes is at least 4 times more common among British South Asians than in the general population. South Asians also have a higher risk of diabetic complications, a situation which has been linked to low levels of physical activity observed amongst this group. Little is known about the factors and considerations which prohibit and/or facilitate physical activity amongst South Asians. This qualitative study explored Pakistani (n = 23) and Indian (n = 9) patients' perceptions and experiences of undertaking physical activity as part of their diabetes care. Although respondents reported an awareness of the need to undertake physical activity, few had put this lifestyle advice into practice. For many, practical considerations, such as lack of time, were interwoven with cultural norms and social expectations. Whilst respondents reported health problems which could make physical activity difficult, these were reinforced by their perceptions and understandings of their diabetes, and its impact upon their future health. Education may play a role in physical activity promotion; however, health promoters may need to work with, rather than against, cultural norms and individual perceptions. We recommend a realistic and culturally sensitive approach, which identifies and capitalizes on the kinds of activities patients already do in their everyday lives.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/her/cyh042
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
140208 Health Economics
Socio Economic Objective 970114 Expanding Knowledge in Economics
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, The author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30023703

Document type: Journal Article
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Deakin Business School
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