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Cell cycle sensing of oxidative stress in saccharomyces cerevisiae by oxidation of a specific cysteine residue in the transcription factor Swi6p

Chiu, Joyce, Tactacan, Carole M., Tan, Shi-Xiong, Lin, Ruby C. Y., Wouters, Merridee A. and Dawes, Ian W. 2011, Cell cycle sensing of oxidative stress in saccharomyces cerevisiae by oxidation of a specific cysteine residue in the transcription factor Swi6p, Journal of biological chemistry, vol. 286, no. 7, pp. 5204-5214, doi: 10.1074/jbc.M110.172973.

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Title Cell cycle sensing of oxidative stress in saccharomyces cerevisiae by oxidation of a specific cysteine residue in the transcription factor Swi6p
Author(s) Chiu, Joyce
Tactacan, Carole M.
Tan, Shi-Xiong
Lin, Ruby C. Y.
Wouters, Merridee A.
Dawes, Ian W.
Journal name Journal of biological chemistry
Volume number 286
Issue number 7
Start page 5204
End page 5214
Total pages 11
Publisher American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Place of publication Bethesda, Md.
Publication date 2011-02-18
ISSN 0021-9258
1083-351X
Summary Yeast cells begin to bud and enter S phase when growth conditions are favourable during G1 phase. When subjected to some oxidative stresses, cells delay entry at G1 allowing repair of cellular damage. Hence, oxidative stress sensing is coordinated with the regulation of cell cycle. We identified a novel function of the cell-cycle regulator of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Swi6p, as a redox sensor through its cysteine residue at position 404. When alanine was substituted at this position, the resultant mutant, C404A, was sensitive to several reactive oxygen species and oxidants including linoleic acid hydroperoxide, the superoxide anion and diamide. This mutant lost the ability to arrest in G1 phase upon treatment with lipid hydroperoxide. The Cys404 residue of Swi6p in wild-type cells was oxidised to a sulfenic acid when cells were subjected to linoleic acid hydroperoxide. Mutation of Cys404 to Ala abolished the down-regulation of expression of the G1 cyclin genes CLN1, CLN2, PCL1 and PCL2 that occurred when cells of the wild type were exposed to the lipid hydroperoxide. In conclusion, oxidative stress signaling for cell-cycle regulation occurs through oxidation of the G1/S-speicific transcription factor Swi6p and consequently leads to suppression of the expression of G1-cyclins and delay in cells entering the cell cycle.
Language eng
DOI 10.1074/jbc.M110.172973
Field of Research 060103 Cell Development, Proliferation and Death
Socio Economic Objective 920502 Health Related to Ageing
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30040565

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.