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Early life stress and child temperament style as predictors of childhood anxiety and depressive symptoms : findings from the longitudinal study of Australian children

Lewis, Andrew J. and Olsson, Craig A. 2011, Early life stress and child temperament style as predictors of childhood anxiety and depressive symptoms : findings from the longitudinal study of Australian children, Depression research and treatment, vol. 2011, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1155/2011/296026.

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Title Early life stress and child temperament style as predictors of childhood anxiety and depressive symptoms : findings from the longitudinal study of Australian children
Author(s) Lewis, Andrew J.ORCID iD for Lewis, Andrew J. orcid.org/0000-0002-2519-7976
Olsson, Craig A.ORCID iD for Olsson, Craig A. orcid.org/0000-0002-5927-2014
Journal name Depression research and treatment
Volume number 2011
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Place of publication New York, N. Y.
Publication date 2011
ISSN 2090-1321
2090-133X
Keyword(s) depression
Summary Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the relationship between stressful infant environments and later childhood anxiety and depressive symptoms varies as a function of individual differences in temperament style.

Methods. Data was drawn fromthe Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). This study examined 3425 infants assessed at three time points, at 1-year, at 2/3 years and at 4/5 years. Temperament was measured using a 12-item version of Toddler Temperament Scale (TTS) and was scored for reactive, avoidant, and impulsive dimensions. Logistic regression was used to model direct relationships and additive interactions between early life stress, temperament, and emotional symptoms at 4 years of age. Analyses were adjusted for socioeconomic status, parental education, andmarital status.

Results. Stressful family environments experienced in the infant’s first year of life (high versus low) and high reactive, avoidant, and impulsive temperament styles directly and independently predicted anxiety and depressive problems in children at 4 years of age. There was no evidence of interaction between temperament and family stress exposure.

Conclusions. Both infant temperament and stress exposures are independent and notable predictors of later anxiety and depressive problems in childhood. The risk relationship between stress exposure in infancy and childhood emotion problems did not vary as a function of infant temperament. Implications for preventive intervention and future research directions are discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1155/2011/296026
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, A. J. Lewis and C. A. Olsson
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30041307

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.