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Molding micropatterns of elasticity on PEG-based hydrogels to control cell adhesion and migration

Diez, Mar, Schulte, Vera A., Stefanoni, Filippo, Natale, Carlo F., Mollica, Francesco, Cesa, Claudia M., Chen, Jingyu, Moller, Martin, Netti, Paolo A., Ventre, Maurizio and Lensen, Marga C. 2011, Molding micropatterns of elasticity on PEG-based hydrogels to control cell adhesion and migration, Advanced engineering materials, vol. 13, no. 10, pp. 395-404, doi: 10.1002/adem.201080122.

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Title Molding micropatterns of elasticity on PEG-based hydrogels to control cell adhesion and migration
Author(s) Diez, Mar
Schulte, Vera A.
Stefanoni, Filippo
Natale, Carlo F.
Mollica, Francesco
Cesa, Claudia M.
Chen, JingyuORCID iD for Chen, Jingyu orcid.org/0000-0002-1275-0656
Moller, Martin
Netti, Paolo A.
Ventre, Maurizio
Lensen, Marga C.
Journal name Advanced engineering materials
Volume number 13
Issue number 10
Start page 395
End page 404
Total pages 10
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2011-10
ISSN 1527-2648
Summary We present an innovative and simple, soft UV lithographic method “FIll-Molding In Capillaries” (FIMIC) that combines soft lithography with capillary force driven filling of micro-channels to create smooth hydrogel substrates with a 2D micro-pattern on the surface. The lithographic procedure involves the molding of a polymer; in our case a bulk PEG-based hydrogel, via UV-curing from a microfabricated silicon master. The grooves of the created regular line pattern are consequently filled with a second hydrogel by capillary action. As a result, a smooth surface is obtained with a well-defined pattern design of the two different polymers on its surface. The FIMIC method is very versatile; the only prerequisite is that the second material is liquid before curing in order to enable the filling process. In this specific case we present the proof of principle of this method by applying two hydrogels which differ in their crosslinking density and therefore in their elasticity. Preliminary cell culture studies on the fabricated elasticity patterned hydrogels indicate the preferred adhesion of the cells to the stiffer regions of the substrates, which implies that the novel substrates are a very useful platform for systematic cell migration studies, e.g. more fundamental investigation of the concept of “durotaxis”
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/adem.201080122
Field of Research 039999 Chemical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970103 Expanding Knowledge in the Chemical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Wiley
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30064399

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
Open Access Collection
GTP Research
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.