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Does mortality vary between Asian subgroups in New Zealand: an application of hierarchical Bayesian modelling

Jatrana, Santosh, Richardson, Ken, Blakely, Tony and Dayal, Saira 2014, Does mortality vary between Asian subgroups in New Zealand: an application of hierarchical Bayesian modelling, PLoS One, vol. 9, no. 8, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0105141.

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Title Does mortality vary between Asian subgroups in New Zealand: an application of hierarchical Bayesian modelling
Author(s) Jatrana, Santosh
Richardson, Ken
Blakely, Tony
Dayal, Saira
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 9
Issue number 8
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Fracisco, Calif.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) death rates
Chinese people
New Zealand
ethnic epidemiology
ethnicities
census
socioeconomics aspects of health
Summary The aim of this paper was to see whether all-cause and cause-specific mortality rates vary between Asian ethnic subgroups, and whether overseas born Asian subgroup mortality rate ratios varied by nativity and duration of residence. We used hierarchical Bayesian methods to allow for sparse data in the analysis of linked census-mortality data for 25-75 year old New Zealanders. We found directly standardised posterior all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates were highest for the Indian ethnic group, significantly so when compared with those of Chinese ethnicity. In contrast, cancer mortality rates were lowest for ethnic Indians. Asian overseas born subgroups have about 70% of the mortality rate of their New Zealand born Asian counterparts, a result that showed little variation by Asian subgroup or cause of death. Within the overseas born population, all-cause mortality rates for migrants living 0-9 years in New Zealand were about 60% of the mortality rate of those living more than 25 years in New Zealand regardless of ethnicity. The corresponding figure for cardiovascular mortality rates was 50%. However, while Chinese cancer mortality rates increased with duration of residence, Indian and Other Asian cancer mortality rates did not. Future research on the mechanisms of worsening of health with increased time spent in the host country is required to improve the understanding of the process, and would assist the policy-makers and health planners.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0105141
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 940204 Public Services Policy Advice and Analysis
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067750

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.