Openly accessible

Feltability of cashmere and other rare animal fibres and the effects of nutrition and blending with wool on cashmere feltability

McGregor, B.A. and Schlink, A.C. 2014, Feltability of cashmere and other rare animal fibres and the effects of nutrition and blending with wool on cashmere feltability, Journal of the Textile Institute, vol. 105, no. 9, pp. 927-937, doi: 10.1080/00405000.2013.865863.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
mcgregor-feltabilityof-post-2014.pdf Accepted version application/pdf 426.09KB 74

Title Feltability of cashmere and other rare animal fibres and the effects of nutrition and blending with wool on cashmere feltability
Author(s) McGregor, B.A.ORCID iD for McGregor, B.A. orcid.org/0000-0002-4574-4236
Schlink, A.C.
Journal name Journal of the Textile Institute
Volume number 105
Issue number 9
Start page 927
End page 937
Total pages 11
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 0040-5000
1754-2340
Keyword(s) easy-care
fibre crimp
loose wool feltability
resistance to compression
Summary Felting is a unique attribute of animal fibres used for the production of a range of industrial and apparel textiles. Felting can be an adverse attribute as a consequence of dimensional shrinkage during laundering. As there is little objective information regarding the feltability of rare animal fibres or the factors which may affect felting three investigations were undertaken. A survey (n = 114) of the feltability of cashmere from different origins of production, cashgora, quivet, camel hair, llama, guanaco, bison wool, cow fibre and yak wool quantified the large variation between and within these fibre types. Cashmere from some origins and cashgora produced higher feltball density than the other fibres. Different nutritional management of cashmere goats (n = 35) showed that cashmere grown by poorly fed goats had a lower propensity to felt compared with cashmere grown by better fed goats. A consequence of the progressive blending of cashmere (n = 27) with a low propensity to felt superfine wool (high fibre curvature) increased the propensity of the blend to felt, but when the same cashmere was blended with low curvature superfine wool, there was little or no effect on feltability. The mechanisms which lead to variance in feltability of these fibres were quantified with multiple regression modelling. The mechanisms were similar to those reported for wools, namely variations in the resistance to compression, fibre curvature and mean fibre diameter, with likely effects of fibre crimp form. It is possible to source cashmere and other animal fibres which have different propensities to felt and therefore to produce textiles which are likely to have different textile properties.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/00405000.2013.865863
Field of Research 091012 Textile Technology
Socio Economic Objective 830599 Primary Animal Products not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Textile Institute
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2016-01-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069692

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
Open Access Collection
GTP Research
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 215 Abstract Views, 76 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Sun, 15 Feb 2015, 16:22:12 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.