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Therapist-assisted Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for depression and anxiety: translating evidence into clinical practice.

Hadjistavropoulos,HD, Pugh,NE, Nugent,MM, Hesser,H, Andersson,G, Ivanov,M, Butz,CG, Marchildon,G, Asmundson,GJ, Klein,B and Austin,DW 2014, Therapist-assisted Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for depression and anxiety: translating evidence into clinical practice., Journal of Anxiety Disorders, vol. 28, no. 8, pp. 884-893, doi: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2014.09.018.

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Title Therapist-assisted Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for depression and anxiety: translating evidence into clinical practice.
Author(s) Hadjistavropoulos,HD
Pugh,NE
Nugent,MM
Hesser,H
Andersson,G
Ivanov,M
Butz,CG
Marchildon,G
Asmundson,GJ
Klein,B
Austin,DWORCID iD for Austin,DW orcid.org/0000-0002-1296-3555
Journal name Journal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume number 28
Issue number 8
Start page 884
End page 893
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Netherlands
Publication date 2014-12
ISSN 1873-7897
Keyword(s) Cognitive behavior therapy
Depression
Generalized anxiety
Internet-delivered
Panic
Therapist-assisted
Social Sciences
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychology, Clinical
Psychiatry
Psychology
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
SELF-REPORT
PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES
PANIC DISORDER
PRIMARY-CARE
MISSING DATA
SCALE
SEVERITY
MODELS
PHQ-9
Summary This dissemination study examined the effectiveness of therapist-assisted Internet-delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy (ICBT) when offered in clinical practice. A centralized unit screened and coordinated ICBT delivered by newly trained therapists working in six geographically dispersed clinical settings. Using an open trial design, 221 patients were offered 12 modules of ICBT for symptoms of generalized anxiety (n=112), depression (n=83), or panic (n=26). At baseline, midpoint and post-treatment, patients completed self-report measures. On average, patients completed 8 of 12 modules. Latent growth curve modeling identified significant reductions in depression, anxiety, stress and impairment (d=.65-.78), and improvements in quality of life (d=.48-.66). Improvements in primary symptoms were large (d=.91-1.25). Overall, therapist-assisted ICBT was effective when coordinated across settings in clinical practice, but further attention should be given to strategies to improve completion of treatment modules.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.janxdis.2014.09.018
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution noncommercial no derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070936

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.