Openly accessible

Predictors and risks of body fat profiles in young New Zealand European, Māori and Pacific women: study protocol for the women's EXPLORE study.

Kruger,R, Shultz,SP, McNaughton,SA, Russell,AP, Firestone,RT, George,L, Beck,KL, Conlon,CA, von Hurst,PR, Breier,B, Jayasinghe,SN, O'Brien,WJ, Jones,B and Stonehouse,W 2015, Predictors and risks of body fat profiles in young New Zealand European, Māori and Pacific women: study protocol for the women's EXPLORE study., SpringerPlus, vol. 4, pp. 128, doi: 10.1186/s40064-015-0916-8.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
shultz-predictorsandrisks-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 930.74KB 150

Title Predictors and risks of body fat profiles in young New Zealand European, Māori and Pacific women: study protocol for the women's EXPLORE study.
Author(s) Kruger,R
Shultz,SP
McNaughton,SAORCID iD for McNaughton,SA orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Russell,APORCID iD for Russell,AP orcid.org/0000-0002-7323-9501
Firestone,RT
George,L
Beck,KL
Conlon,CA
von Hurst,PR
Breier,B
Jayasinghe,SN
O'Brien,WJ
Jones,B
Stonehouse,W
Journal name SpringerPlus
Volume number 4
Start page 128
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Switzerland
Publication date 2015
ISSN 2193-1801
Keyword(s) Body fat profile
Dietary practices
Metabolic disease risk
MicroRNA
Overweight and obesity
Physical activity
Predictors
Taste perception
Women
Summary Body mass index (BMI) (kg/m(2)) is used internationally to assess body mass or adiposity. However, BMI does not discriminate body fat content or distribution and may vary among ethnicities. Many women with normal BMI are considered healthy, but may have an unidentified "hidden fat" profile associated with higher metabolic disease risk. If only BMI is used to indicate healthy body size, it may fail to predict underlying risks of diseases of lifestyle among population subgroups with normal BMI and different adiposity levels or distributions. Higher body fat levels are often attributed to excessive dietary intake and/or inadequate physical activity. These environmental influences regulate genes and proteins that alter energy expenditure/storage. Micro ribonucleic acid (miRNAs) can influence these genes and proteins, are sensitive to diet and exercise and may influence the varied metabolic responses observed between individuals. The study aims are to investigate associations between different body fat profiles and metabolic disease risk; dietary and physical activity patterns as predictors of body fat profiles; and whether these risk factors are associated with the expression of microRNAs related to energy expenditure or fat storage in young New Zealand women. Given the rising prevalence of obesity globally, this research will address a unique gap of knowledge in obesity research.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s40064-015-0916-8
Field of Research 111104 Public Nutrition Intervention
Socio Economic Objective 920412 Preventive Medicine
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Springer
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072212

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 526 Abstract Views, 151 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 21 Apr 2015, 16:11:01 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.