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Short-term changes in quitting-related cognitions and behaviours after the implementation of plain packaging with larger health warnings : findings from a national cohort study with Australian adult smokers

Durkin, Sarah, Brennan, Emily, Coomber, Kerri, Zacher, Meghan, Scollo, Michelle and Wakefield, Melanie 2015, Short-term changes in quitting-related cognitions and behaviours after the implementation of plain packaging with larger health warnings : findings from a national cohort study with Australian adult smokers, Tobacco control, vol. 24, no. Supplement 2, pp. ii26-ii32, doi: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2014-052058.

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Title Short-term changes in quitting-related cognitions and behaviours after the implementation of plain packaging with larger health warnings : findings from a national cohort study with Australian adult smokers
Author(s) Durkin, Sarah
Brennan, Emily
Coomber, Kerri
Zacher, Meghan
Scollo, Michelle
Wakefield, Melanie
Journal name Tobacco control
Volume number 24
Issue number Supplement 2
Start page ii26
End page ii32
Total pages 7
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-04-01
ISSN 0964-4563
Summary ABSTRACT
Background: Plain packaging (PP) with larger graphic health warnings (GHWs) was implemented in Australia in late 2012. This study examined effects of these packaging changes on short-term changes in quitting-related cognitions and behaviours.
Methods: We used a series of cohorts of Australian adult cigarette smokers originally sourced from a nationally representative cross-sectional tracking survey, followed up approximately 1 month after their baseline interview (n(weighted)=5441). Logistic regression analyses compared changes in seven quitting-related outcomes over this 1-month follow-up period for the cohorts surveyed before PP, over the period of transition to PP, and during the first year of PP, adjusting for baseline levels of the outcome and covariates.
Results: Compared to the referent group of smokers who completed their follow-up survey pre-PP, those who were followed-up in the early transition period showed greater increases in rates of stopping themselves from smoking (OR=1.51, 95% CI (1.08 to 2.10)) and higher quit attempt rates (OR=1.43, 95% CI (1.00 to 2.03)), those followed-up in the late transition period showed greater increases in intentions to quit (OR=1.42, 95% CI (1.06 to 1.92)) and pack concealment (OR=1.55, 95% CI (1.05 to 2.31)), and those followed- up in the first year of PP showed higher levels of pack concealment (OR=1.65, 95% CI (1.01 to 2.72)), more premature stubbing out of cigarettes (OR=1.55, 95% CI (1.01 to 2.36)), and higher quit attempt rates (OR=1.52, 95% CI (1.01 to 2.30)).
Conclusions: These findings provide some of the strongest evidence to date that implementation of PP with larger GHWs was associated with increased rates of quitting cognitions, microindicators of concern and quit attempts among adult cigarette smokers.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2014-052058
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920413 Social Structure and Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, BMJ Publishing Group
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073530

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.