Using transcranial magnetic stimulation to quantify electrophysiological changes following concussive brain injury: a systematic review

Major, Brendan P, Rogers, Mark A and Pearce, Alan J 2015, Using transcranial magnetic stimulation to quantify electrophysiological changes following concussive brain injury: a systematic review, Clinical and experimental pharmacology and physiology, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 394-405, doi: 10.1111/1440-1681.12363.

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Title Using transcranial magnetic stimulation to quantify electrophysiological changes following concussive brain injury: a systematic review
Author(s) Major, Brendan P
Rogers, Mark AORCID iD for Rogers, Mark A orcid.org/0000-0002-6808-9545
Pearce, Alan J
Journal name Clinical and experimental pharmacology and physiology
Volume number 42
Issue number 4
Start page 394
End page 405
Total pages 12
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Place of publication Richmond, Vic.
Publication date 2015-04
ISSN 1440-1681
Keyword(s) concussion
evoked potential
mild traumatic brain injury
systematic review
transcranial magnetic stimulation
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Pharmacology & Pharmacy
Physiology
SPORT-RELATED CONCUSSION
HUMAN MOTOR CORTEX
CHRONIC TRAUMATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY
IMPAIRED CORTICAL INHIBITION
SILENT PERIOD
HEAD-INJURY
LONG-TERM
INTRACORTICAL INHIBITION
FOOTBALL CODES
EXCITABILITY
Summary Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and sports concussion are a growing public health concern, with increasing demands for more rigorous methods to quantify changes in the brain post-injury. Electrophysiology, and in particular, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), have been demonstrated to provide prognostic value in a range of neurological conditions; however, no review has quantified the efficacy of TMS in mTBI/concussion. In the present study, we present a systematic review and critical evaluation of the scientific literature from 1990 to 2014 that has used TMS to investigate corticomotor excitability responses at short-term (< 12 months), medium-term (1-5 years), and long-term (> 5 years) post-mTBI/concussion. Thirteen studies met the selection criteria, with six studies presenting short-term changes, five studies presenting medium-term changes, and two studies presenting long-term changes. Irrespective of time post-concussion, change in intracortical inhibition was the most reported observation. Other findings included increased stimulation threshold, and slowed neurological conduction time. Although currently limited, the data suggest that TMS has prognostic value in detecting neurophysiological changes post-mTBI/concussion.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/1440-1681.12363
Field of Research 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30073765

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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