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The effectiveness of community-based cycling promotion: findings from the Cycling Connecting Communities project in Sydney, Australia

Rissel, Chris E., New, Carolyn, Wen, Li Ming, Merom, Dafna, Bauman, Adrian E. and Garrard, Jan 2010, The effectiveness of community-based cycling promotion: findings from the Cycling Connecting Communities project in Sydney, Australia, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 7, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-7-8.

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Title The effectiveness of community-based cycling promotion: findings from the Cycling Connecting Communities project in Sydney, Australia
Formatted title The effectiveness of community-based cycling promotion: findings from the Cycling Connecting Communities project in Sydney, Australia
Author(s) Rissel, Chris E.
New, Carolyn
Wen, Li Ming
Merom, Dafna
Bauman, Adrian E.
Garrard, Jan
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 7
Article ID 8
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2010-01-27
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
LEISURE-TIME
WORK
MORTALITY
WALKING
HEALTH
TRAIL
WOMEN
Summary BACKGROUND: Encouraging cycling is an important way to increase physical activity in the community. The Cycling Connecting Communities (CCC) Project is a community-based cycling promotion program that included a range of community engagement and social marketing activities, such as organised bike rides and events, cycling skills courses, the distribution of cycling maps of the area and coverage in the local press. The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of this program designed to encourage the use of newly completed off-road cycle paths through south west Sydney, Australia.

METHODS: The evaluation used a quasi-experimental design that consisted of a pre- and post-intervention telephone survey (24 months apart) of a cohort of residents (n = 909) in the intervention area (n = 520) (Fairfield and Liverpool) and a socio-demographically similar comparison area (n = 389) (Bankstown). Both areas had similar bicycle infrastructure. Four bicycle counters were placed on the main bicycle paths in the intervention and comparison areas to monitor daily bicycle use before and after the intervention.

RESULTS: The telephone survey results showed significantly greater awareness of the Cycling Connecting Communities project (13.5% vs 8.0%, p < 0.05) in the intervention area, with significantly higher rates of cycling in the intervention area (32.9%) compared with the comparison area (9.7%) amongst those aware of the project. There was a significant increase in use of bicycle paths in the intervention area (28.3% versus 16.2%, p < 0.05). These findings were confirmed by the bike count data.

CONCLUSION: Despite relatively modest resources, the Cycling Connecting Communities project achieved significant increases in bicycle path use, and increased cycling in some sub-groups. However, this community based intervention with limited funding had very limited reach into the community and did not increase population cycling levels.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-7-8
Field of Research 11 Medical And Health Sciences
13 Education
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075467

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.