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Prevention of fractures in older people with calcium and vitamin D

Nowson, Caryl A. 2010, Prevention of fractures in older people with calcium and vitamin D, Nutrients, vol. 2, no. 9, pp. 975-984, doi: 10.3390/nu2090975.

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Title Prevention of fractures in older people with calcium and vitamin D
Author(s) Nowson, Caryl A.ORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl A. orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 2
Issue number 9
Start page 975
End page 984
Total pages 10
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2010-09
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) calcium
vitamin D
fracture
meta-analysis
Accidental Falls
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Bone Density
Calcium, Dietary
Dietary Supplements
Female
Food, Fortified
Fractures, Bone
Hip Fractures
Humans
Male
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength
Osteoporosis
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
RANDOMIZED-CONTROLLED-TRIALS
D SUPPLEMENTATION
HIP FRACTURE
FEMORAL-NECK
D-DEFICIENCY
BONE LOSS
RISK
METAANALYSIS
WOMEN
FALLS
Summary The greatest cause of fracture in older people is osteoporosis which contributes to increased morbidity and mortality in older people. A number of meta-analyses have been performed assessing the effectiveness of calcium supplementation alone, vitamin D supplementation alone and the combined therapy on bone loss and fracture reduction in older people. The results of these meta-analyses indicate that vitamin D supplementation alone is unlikely to reduce fracture risk, calcium supplementation alone has a modest effect in reducing total fracture risk, but compliance with calcium supplements is poor in the long term. The combination of calcium supplementation with vitamin D supplementation, particularly in those at risk of marginal and low vitamin D status reduces total fractures, including hip fractures. Therefore older people would be recommended to consume adequate dietary calcium (>1100 mg/day) together with maintaining adequate vitamin D status (>60 nmol/L 25(OH)D) to reduce risk of fracture. It is a challenge to consume sufficient dietary calcium from dietary sources, but the increasing range of calcium fortified foods could assist in increasing the dietary calcium intake of older people. In addition to the usual dairy based food sources, vitamin D supplements are likely to be required for older people with reduced mobility and access to sunlight.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu2090975
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, The Author
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076741

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.